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September 17, 1956 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-17

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THE MCHIGAN DAILY

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17,1958

THE MICHIGAN DAILY MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17,1956

EIGHTH PRESIDENT:
Harlan Hatcher Begins
Sixth Year At University

PRESIDENT AND MRS. HARLAN HATCHER-Eighth president
of the University, Harlan Hatcher and his wife pause for a cup
of tea.

Fraternities
Study North
Campus Site
The expansion of the Universi-
ty, the Fraternity system, and in-
dividual houses, has made the
problem of fraternity housing a
serious one.
Increased enrollment has meant
that many chapters threaten to
gain so many new members that
they will become unwieldly. Zon-
ing ordinances imposed, within re-
cent years prohibit many groups
from repairing or improving their
residences because of restrictions
on multiple housing. Attempts by
established or incoming groups to
buy land are thwarted by the same
law or excessive prices.
As a result, the Interfraternity
Council and a panel of Alumni fra-
ternity advisors last year institut-
ed a study of the housing situa-
tion with a view towards estab-
lishment of a North Campus "Fra-
ternity Row".
The study, completed early last
spring, outlined problems faced by
affiliated groups when considering
either expansion or relocation near
the present, campus, and surveyed
the policies of colleges and uni-
versities throughout the nation
concerning their own fraternity
rows -and financing schemes.
40 Replies
The report listed 40 replies, rang-
ing from Brown University's fra-
ternity quads to Wyoming's fra-
ternity row with sorority houses on
one side of a parkway and fra-
ternity houses on the other. The
University of Miami included its
special arrangements for the con-
struction of swimming pools.
After study of this report, Wil-
Ham S. Zerman, past Assistant
Dean of Men in Charge of Fra-
ternities, reported that the plan
"most favorable" to the advisor's
group was that of Indiana Uni-
versity. That report read in part:
Sell Lots Outright
"We do sell lots of fraternities
outright, but there are no gifts or
leases used. Lots that we recently
sold have been from 1.37 to 1.7
acres in size and are priced at
$7,500. The University negotiates
loans for the fraternities with pri-
vate capital. A fraternity may bor-
row as much as 66% from the
lender; a limit set by the laws of
the state. There are no University
money or state funds involved in
the transaction.
"The University only agrees to
buy the home, should the lendee
fail to meet its obligation. The two
fraternity row areas are from five
to fifteen minutes to the class-
rooms. There are no general play
areas. Our houses are not part of
a lease system. They are owned
and operated by the individual fra-
ternities.
"Our most recent buildings are
designed to house seventy-five men
or more and have been built at a
cost of between $225,000 and $270,-
000."
Just what parts of this plan will
eventually be incorporated in a
Michigan Fraternity Row are not
known now. But within a short
time after the beginning of the
school year, concrete plans are
scheduled to be made to Universi-
ty Vice-President Wilbur Pierpont
by the.IFC-Alumni Advisors group.

CULTURAL OUTINGS:
Lane Hall Coordinates
All Religious Activities

The University's eighth presi-
dent, Harlan Hatcher, will begin
his sixth year this September as
head of one of the largest schools
in the nation.
Since his appointment in May,
1951, to succeed retiring President
Alexander Ruthven, the 57-year-
old educator, author and civic
leader has won wide recognition
and respect in educational circles.'
President Hatcher's background
is extensive and distinguished.'
Originally from Ironton, O., he'
attended Morehead Normal School
in Kentucky, then moved on to
Ohio State University, where he
received his undergraduate train-
ing and later, in 1927, his Ph.D.
Tutoring Files
At League, nrion
Up-to-date tutoring files listing
students interested in tutoring are
available in the League and Union'
who want help before final exami-
nations.

After a period of postgraduate
study both here and abroad, he
returned to Ohio State in 1922 to
accept a position as an instructor.
He was appointed to a full pro-
fessorship in 1932, joined the ad-
ministration as dean in 1944, where
he served until September,. 1948,
when he became vice-president in
charge of faculties and curricu-
lcm.
Among the awards for his ac-
complishments is the Ohio Gover-
nor's Award, which he received in
1949 for the advancement of Ohio's
prestige, and the Ohioana Grand
Medal, given him in 1950 for his
books dealing with Ohio and the
Northwest Territory.
Aiding President Hatcher in ad-
ministrating the University is a
staff of highly competent educa-
tors. Vice President and Dean of
Faculties is Marvin L. Niehuss,
Vice President Wilbur K. Pierpont
is in charge of business and fi-
nance, Herbert'G. Watkins is Sec-
retary and Assistant Vice-Presi-
dent, and University Relations is
headed by Arthur L. Brandon.

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES COORDINATED HERE-Lane Hall is
the center of the Unversity's religious organizations. It works
through the Office of Religious Affairs.
An open house, a freshman discussion group and inter-cultural
outings will highlight Lane Hall religious program for Incoming
students this fall.
Lane Hall is the center of all coordinated religious activities at
the University. Working through the Office of Religious Affairs, It
coordinates each church group with the campus.
The open house will provide an opportunity fbr students to get
acquainted with each other. Students having questions on campus
life and its impact on religion

will be able to participate in the
freshman discussion group during
the first or second week of classes.
Intercultural outings consist of
weekends away from campus with
a group of foreign students from
one particular country. Several of
these are planned.
Each church in Ann Arbor con-
ducts its own student program. In
addition to these, however, the
Newman Club for Catholic stu
dents has an organization on cam-
pus, Hillel provides a complete
program for the University's Jew-
ish population, and Protestant
students have formed an Inter-
Guili Council. .

Alumnus

- I
BUY GARG AND DROP ENGLISH 1
fail issue L
OUT SEPTEMBER 21
with
RACING SECTION FAIRY TALES
PETER AND THE WOLF
BOB MAITLAND
FIRST STAFF MEETING 25C

Interprets
'U'Growth
Immediately after the first class
graduated on August 6, 1845 a
society of alumnus was formed.
From this inauspicious beginning
the alumni association has grown
to encompass over 285 alumni
clubs throughout the country with
headquarters in Alumni Memorial
Hall.
A chief activity of the Alumni
Association is publication of The
Michigan Alumnus nagazine with
a circulation of 15,000 subscribers.
In addition to ten issues of The
Alumnus, 4 quarterly reports and
7 "football newsletters" are pro-
vided. Subscriptions to the maga-
zine furnish the Alumni Associa-
tion wth most of its operating ex-
penses.
"The Alumnus informs alumni
of whats going on ?.nd interprets
the changing University," Harold
M. Wilson, managing editor of
The Alumnus claims.
"In the number of pages printed
per subscriber we are one of the
top two alumni magazines in the
country, topped only by Princeton
which publishes once a week," he
reported.
The magazine recently received
awards for being one of the ninb
best alumni magazines in the
country from the American Alumni
Council.
The Senior Class officers work
with the Alumni Association. in
planning class reunions and get
togethers.

A

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