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September 29, 1956 - Image 5

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Michigan Daily, 1956-09-29

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SATURDAY, SEPTEIVBER 29, 2956

THE MCBIGAN D"AHA

PAGE M- 1P,

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1958 THE MICHIGAN DAITA~ PAGE PTV~

Wolverine Eleven Hosts Bruins Today

UCLA's Starting Lineup
Includes Two Seniors

(Continued firomn Page 1

Garro, tackle Preston Dills and
halfback ChuckHolloway-would
like to save their, eligibility for a
later set of five consecutive con-!
tests that would include UCLA's
seventh foe, Stanford.
Other Bruin Lettermen
Other starting lettermen for the
UCLAns will be 201-lb. guard
Esker Harris, end Hal Smith, tackle
Jerry Penner and - center Jim
Matheny. The entire left side of
the starting line will be composed
of sophomores with only the Utah
game for college experience.

In addition, sophs Louis Elias at
wingback and fullback Barry Bill-
ington will start for the Bruins.
Michigan will also have sopho-
mores at two backfield positions,
but experienced players will man
all the other spots. Coach Ooster-
baan is counting heavily on new-
comers Bob Ptacek, 208-lb. left
halfback, and 212-lb. John Herrn-
stein- at fullback to carry their full
share of backfield work.
As tailback, Ptacek will have
ample opportunity to show both
his highly-regarded running and
passing talents. Herrnstein, the
third generation of a famous
Michigan football family, was co-
winner, with Ptacek, of the Meyer
W. Morton Award for greatest im-
provement during this year's spring
practice.
Barr, Van Pelt in Backfield
Veterans Terry Barr at right
half and Jim Van Pelt at quarter-
back complete the starting back-
field for Michigan. Barr will be
making a change from left half-
back, while Van Pelt will be doing
less ball-handling as emphasis
shifts from the T-formation.

BOB PTAGEK JOHN HERRNSTEIN
... Wolverine sophomore starters
Powerful Bears, Rais
Picked in Western Division

Today's
UCLA
Wallen LE
Dawson LT
Whitfield LG
Matheny C
Harris RG
Penner RT
Smith RE
Bergdahl QB
Bradle LH
Elias R B
Billington FB

Lineups
MICHIGAN
Kramer
Orwig
Hill
Rotunno
Nyren
Sigman
Maentz
Van Pelt
Ptacek
Barr
Herrnstein

Second of Two Articles t
By SI COLEMAN
Closely paralleling the Eastern
Division in the National Football
League is its cousin, the Western
Division.
This parallel is evident in that
both Divisions are expected to be
dominated by a two-team race.
There is a strong feeling among
many veteran observers of the
profess onal gridiron sport that
1956 Bt;.r aggregation has the po-
tential to become a typical old-
time Bear powerhoubc
GeorgeHalas, closing out a 35-
year coaching career last year,
has retired to the Bears' front of-

JIM VAN PELT
.. starting quarterback

I

IN EASTERN HEADLINER:
High Ranked Syracuse, Pitt Meet Today

fice. The man in the best position
to bring that prophecy to fulfill-
ment is genial Paddy Driscoll, a
trusted lieutenant of Halas over
the years who, at 60, has assumed
the Bear head coaching role.
The combination of Ed Brown,
quarterback from San Francisco
University, and Harlon Hill, the
overnight pass catching sensation
from obscure Alabama State
Teachers college, should provide
the Bears with plenty of offense.
Rams Feature Passes
Furnishing the chief opposition
will probably be the Los Angeles
Rams. Led by quarterback Norm
VanBrocklin, the Rams will feature
much passing, especially with three
outstanding ends all on the same
team.
Coach Lisle Blackbourn of the
Green Bay Packers must sell his
veterans on the fact that it's pos-
sible for them to win the champ-
ionship. Their outstanding star is
quarterback Tobin Rote.
Vessels Bolsters Colts
Perhaps the dark horse in the
Western Division is the Baltimore
Colts. Acquisition of Billy Vessels,
former Oklahoma All-American,
plus other returning servicemen,
holdovers, and a promising array
of rookies assure the Colts of a
' multiple-gaited attack for the
1956 race.
Much of San Francisco's suc-
cess will depend on their quarter-
back, Y. A. Tittle. When he's hot,
the 49er's usually roll.
The once mighty Detroit Lions
are plagued by many "ifs." If cer-
tain key performers come through
then they'll be tough. If certain
aging veterans keep off the hos-
pital list, there is a possibility that
the Lions can finish high. But
frankly, there isn't any reason to
make the Lions a contender.

Pioneers Fall
To Northern;
Streak Ends
FLINT, (P) - Flashing speed
reminiscent of the 1950 'State
Champions, Flint Northern High
ended Ann Arbor's fabulous 40-
game undefeated streak before a
record 10,934 fans last night, 33-0.
Rolling up a yardage margin of
494 to 99, Flint handed Ann Arbor
its first shutout since Battle Creek
held the Pioneers to a scoreless
tie on Oct. 15, 1954.
With eight seconds left in the
first quarter, State quarter mile
champion, John Sharp sprinted 75
yards for Northern's first touch-
down.
Two TD Edge at Half
Early in the second quarter, Ar-
den Relerford broke through for
62 yards and Flint's second touch-
down. Relerford kicked both points
and Northern led 14-0 at halftime.
Quarterback Luke Waters went
33 yards on a rollout for the third
Viking touchdown early in the
third quarter. Before the period
ended, Sharp scored his fifth
touchdown of the year on a one-
yard dive over the line.
Flint's final score came in the
last quarter, when Phil Gaines.
scored from one-yard out. Earlier
Gaines broke loose on a 53-yard
punt return for a score that was
nullified by a penalty.
TODAY'S COLLEGE GAMES
EAST
Army vs. VMI
Boston U. vs. Massachusetts
Colgate vs. Cornell
Columbia vs. Brown
Dartmouth vs. New Hampshire
Lehigh vs. Delaware
Navy vs. William & Ml'ftry j
Pennsylvania vs. Penn St.
Pittsburgh vs. Syracuse
Princeton vs. Rutgers
Trinity vs. Williams
SOUTH AND SOUTHWEST
Arkansas vs. Oklahoma
Baylor vs. Texas Tech.
Florida vs. Clemson
Georgia vs. Florida St.
Kentucky vs. Mississippi
Louisiana St. vs. Texas A & M
Southern Methodist vs. Georgia
Tech
Tennessee vs. Auburn
Tulane vs. Texas
Virginia vs. Duke
Wake Forest vs. Maryland
WEST
Illinois vs. California
Indiana vs. Iowa
Kansas vs. College of Pacific
Michigan vs. UCLA
Northwestern vs. Iowa St.
Ohio St. vs. Nebraska
Oklahoma vs. North Carolina
Purdue vs. Missouri
Wisconsin vs. Marquette
FAR WEST
Colorado vs. Kansas St.
Oregon vs. Idaho
Stanford vs. Idaho
Stanford vs. Michigan St.
Washington vs. Minnesota

By DON McGHEE
College football goes into full
swing today and some ofithe top
teams across the country will be
battling each other for those all
important early season wins.
One of the biggest games finds
Pittsburgh matched against Syra-
cuse in Pittsburgh.
This game should be a factor in
deciding who will be the Eastern
football champion this year, for
these two squads are among the.
top ranking independents in the
land. Pittsburgh's big gun, Joe
Walton, end, caught eight touch-
down passes last year and along
with Bob Pollock, tackle, and
Corny Salvaterra, Pitt's improved
passing quarterback, head the
Panthers championship hopes.
Seek Second Win
Syracuse will be out to wallop
Pitt as revenge for their 22-12 loss
to the Panthers last year. The
powerful ground team, using its
Wing-T with halfback Jim Brown
as the key figure will be looking
for its second win of the season.
Last week Syracuse dumped the
powerful Maryland eleven by two
4ouchdowns. This fact alone makes
the Orangemen a team to watch,
and the Syracuse-Pittsburgh game
an important one.
Arnold Leads Mustangs
Georgia Tech, last year's Sugar
Bowl winner, meets SMU, a team
boasting only two returning start-
ers. But the game is very likely to
be quite a scramble. Charlie Ar-
nold. the quarterback who engin-
eered the Notre Dame upset, is
expected to show an improvement
in his passing abilities.
Georgia Tech has most of its
Sugar Bowl winning team back
this year. Its veteran squad in-
cludes speedy halfback George
Volkert, quarterback Wade Mitch-
ell, a great defensive player, and
Paul Rotenberry, halfback.
Army, scheduled to play in Ann
Arbor on Oct. 13, meets Virginia
Iillitary Institute. While VMI's
main hopes lie in the hands of a
sophomore-dominated squad, it is
said that the team has a strong
running attack, lead by fullback
Sam Woolwine, junior.
Army Braced by Veterans
Army is, from all appearances,
much stronger than VMI. Six of
last year's starting linemen are
back, including Ed Szvetcz, center
and Stan Slater, guard.
The backfield however lacks the{
experience of the line. With Pat
Uebel and Don Holleder gone,
Coach Red Blaik will probably -be
using Vince Barta at fullback and

Bruins to Watch
44-Bob Bergdahl. Quarter-
back, Senior, 5'11", 192 lbs.
12-Doug Bradley. Left Half-
back, Senior, 5'9", 172 lbs.
67--Esker H a r r i s. Right
Guard, Junior, 6'0", 201 lbs. 1
51-Jim Matheny. Center,
Junior, 6'0", 211 lbs.
25-Barry Billington. Full-
back, Sophomore, 5'10", 170 lbs.
'M' Receives
Heavy Radio,
TV Coverage
Michigan returns to the foot-,

Dick Murtland and Joe Cygler are
certain to see plenty of action in
the backfield.
Sooners Tackle TarHeels
Oklahoma, ranked by many as
the number one team in the coun-
try again this year, plays host to
the strong North Carolina eleven.
Oklahoma, with 30 wins in a
row, has a big line, built around
such giants as tackle Edmond Gray
and center Jerry Tubbs. The
speedy Sooner backfield is lead by
Tommy McDonald and Jimmy
Harris, and the veteran team has
plenty of everything else necessary
for a top ranking team.
North Carolina sports such men
as halfback Ed Sutton and end
Buddy Payne, but Dave Reed,
starting quarterback, has been on
the sidelines with a torn knee
ligament.
The worst worry for Coach Jim

Eight Intersectional Tilts
Face Big Ten Gridders

TOP THREE TAILBACKS on UCLA varsity squad (1. to r.) sophomore Don Long, the star of the
undefeated 1956 Bruin Frosh team; senior Doug Bradley, a talented two-year veteran; and junior
Edison Griffin, a promising graduate of the junior varsity, prepare for today's clash with /the
Wolverines at the Michigan Stadium.

Tatum is probably his lack of a
strong line, and this weakness is
apt to prove fatal especially this
afternoon.
Kentucky and Mississippi play'
an important Southeastern Con-
ference game today. Mississippi is
last year's conference champs but
the team has lost nine of its
eleven starters. Coach Johnny'
Vaught is filling the gaps with,
men like Paige Cothren, fullback'
and Eddie Crawford, left half.
No Rain in Sight
Today's weather will be warm
and windy wit hincreasing
cloudiness. The winds will blow
at 20-25 miles per hour and
'today's high temperature will
be in the upper 70's.

ball wars today with the full ra-
dio and television coverage that
symbolizes big time college foot-
ball.
There will be a total of nine
radio and three network hook-ups
on hand to broadcast the game
across the nation. NBC will handle
a regional telecast back to the
coast.
Harmon Airs Games
Tom Harmon returns to the
scene of his former glories to take
charge of the CBS Pacific Coast
Network. Leo Durocher will handle
the color part of the telecast. Curt
Gowdy, NBC, New York, sends
the broadcast back east.
A host of announcers are pres-
ent from the Detroit stations. Bill
Flemming, represents WWJ, Bob
Reynolds and Ty Tyson WJR, Van
Patric kand Frank .Sims WKMH,
and Don Wattrick, WXYZ.
The University station, WUOM,
handles a 21-station statewide
network. Bill.Stegath handles the
play-by-play and Ed Burrows pro-
vides the color. Bob Ufer covers
for local station WPAG and Tom
O'Connor sends out the game for
WIBM in Jackson.

Iowa, Indiana Open
Michigan State Faces
By BOB BOLTONG
Big Ten teams will have a
chance to prove their reputation
as college football's toughest
league this weekend as they launch
the 1956 season with one confer-
ence and eight intersectional
games.
Four opening games will be
played with Pacific Coast teams
as Illinois meets California, Mich-
igan State battles Stanford, Min-
nesota clashes with Washington,
as well as the Michigan-UCLA
contest.
Hawkeyes Invade Indiana
Two Big Seven teams will also
be on the Big Ten program today
with Missouri at Purdue and Neb-
raska at Ohio State. The opening
conference game features Iowa at
Indiana while Wisconsin takes on
a soft touch in Marquette.
All Big Ten teams go into to-
day's games as fairly solid favor-
ponents and Iowa gets the nod
ites over their non-conference op-
over Indiana in conference play.
The games to watch are the
Michigan State and Illinois con-
tests, as both face strong teams
and the outcome should provide a
guide to their comparative:
strength.
The Spartans. a good bet forl
national honors, are a loaded team
this year, studded with potential
All-Americans and backed with
solid depth.
Stanford Seeks Revenge
Stanford, out to avenge last
year's 38-14 beating at the hands
of State, will play with the added
advantage of a home field. The
Indians will present a pro-type

Conference Season;
Stanford on Coast
attack and will pass as much as
they run.
Illinois coach Ray Eliot puts an
almost spotless record of nine
wins and one loss against Coast
teams on the line as he takes on
California's Golden Bears at
Champaign.
The Illini, conference dark horse
this year could be suffering again
from a chronic illness which has
plagued them the last- two sea-
sons, that of great backs and no
line.
Veteran Backs Return
With Wolverine killer Bob
Mitchell at one half and running
mates Harry Jefferson and Abe
Woodson alternating at the oth-
er, the Illini have one of the
strongest potential backfields in
the country. But from end to end
with the exception of center the
Illini are woefully weak.
Big Ten champs Ohio State
will make a bid for an unprece-
dented third straight title this
year and even without Hopalong
Cassady the Buckeyes look im-
pressive.
Buckeyes, Nebraska Clash
Playing against Nebraska, a.
team rated no better than an also
ran in the Big Seven, should pro-
vide scant opposition for the pow-
erful Ohio ground attack, which
averaged 310 yards per game last
year.
Purdue, another conference
dark horse, once again has the
services of aerial artist Lenny
Dawson and if they can muster
up any sort of ground game, Mis-
souri hopes for an upset should
fade.

swuv-

I WON'T WEAR A THING
BUT TOWNE AND KING!it

says HECTOR LIBERACHI, pegostick champ,
SNOWBA-N46, ALA., Sept. 10-.
Rated the fastest mant on a pogo stick
since St. Vitus, Hector circled his old
man's barn on his bouncing broomstick
in 7.3 sec. flat, a new record. Hector's
bobbies. are taxidermy, fiddlin' and
girls. When interviewed, he said
modestly,"'Twarn't nuthin'. I had a dry
track' Hector, a 7-color sweaterman,
says Townella Sweater Shirts are bi*
four season favorite.
TowNE. A Sweater Shirts; premium
quality imported fibres. 6 California
colors; S:M-L-XL-10.95. Crew length
sox in matching colors; 104 -13-1.95.
TOWNE AND KING, LTD,
Coordinated Knitwear .
$95 Broadway, Redwood City. California

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The

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with NANCY DR'EW

HILL AUDITORIUM... 9.15P.M.... Friday, October 5... $1.25 and 90c

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with NANCY DREW

Ticket Sale Sept. 28 - Oct. 5. . . Window C ... Administration Building

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1'he J Niel,

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with NANCY DREW

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