100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 28, 1956 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, S E ER 28, 1956

?AGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAilY FRIDAY. SEPTEMflER 2R. 1956

a...:s. w+.a .... x +..+...,... ,... a..+,.n..a. .usv rr.. f y..., ..

I

Gifternaquild
Tonight 7:00 and 9:00
PHANTO10M-
of the OPERA
(Color)
CLAUDE RAINS
NELSON EDDY
SUSANNA FOSTER
Architecture Auditorium 50c

AIR FORCE TESTS:
Engineers Study Fuel Flow

U Prof. Tells Impressions
Of Philippine Islands Visit

T !

To help the Air Force refuel
its jet bombers faster, tempera-
tures ranging between those of
the Arctic and desert regions of
the world are being duplicated on
the University's North Campus.
The study is centering around a
special trailer, built for the Air
Force by the Pryor Manufacturing
Company of Mansfield, Ohio,
which will regulate the high speed
flow of fuel from the base's pipe
line into the bomber's fuel tanks.
To test the special trailer's per-
formance under extreme tempera-
ture, especially insulated buildings
have been erected around the unit.
These buildings, in which the tem-
perature tests will take place, were
erected by a group of mechanical
pengineers under the direction of
Prof. Glenn V. Edmondson.
Using dry ice, they have lowered
temperatures in the buildings to
98 degrees below zero, far below
the minus 65 degrees specified for
the tests. Temperatures to the
magnitude of 160 degrees above
zero are being produced by a series
of electric heating elements, and
conditions of desert sunlight are
produced by batteries of special
lamps.
Professor Edmondson explains
that the researchers are interested
in the performance of the trailer's
precision parts over a wide range
of temperature differences between
the flowing fuel and the trailer's
environment.
The need for a unit of this type
arises from the necessity of pre-
venting fuel pressure from damag-
ing the plane's fuel system. Prof.
Edmondson adds that the destruc-

Former Star Anti-Communist
Witness Convicted of Perjury

tive pressures are the result of
sudden stops in the flow of fuel.
The effect is much like the bang-
ing of a Water faucet when it is
suddenly closed.
Besides the trailer and the tem-
perature control buildings, the
sprawling research project con-
tains a 1,000 foot pipeline, a 6,000
gallon storage tank for fuel, an
electric power line and controll
panels and another trailer, a house
trailer. The house trailer itself
contains about $30,000 worth of
research instruments.
The Pryor Manufacturing Com-
pany's Research Institute is ad-
ministering the project while fac-
ulty members and eight under-

graduate students from the College
of Engineering are conducting the
research.
On their own, the engineers have
investigated the hydronamic prop-
erties of fast flowing fuels beyond
the scope specified by the Air
Force's project. Studies of sonic
velocities in fuel, transient wave
forms and the damping charac-
teristics of hydrant systems are
being pursued, and reports on the
studies will be published in scien-
tific literature.
The project, providing valuable
research experience for students,
is typical of those to be under-
taken in the University's new
North Campus Fluids Laboratory.

NOW SHOWING Dial NO 2-2513 Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 91
"Guinness creates "Katie Johnson is a
another rare bird captivating old sparrow
with his usual finesse 1" ct I .L J(who) steals the sho
-Zinsser, -Herald Tribur
THE . ARTHUR RANK ORGANIZATIr 4 PRESENTS
/e Mo uinnosS
TECmN(COLOR and (in the order of their disappearance)
CECiL PARKER " PETER SELLERS " DANNY GREEN " HERBERT LOM co-featuring KATIE JOHNSON

P.M.
w

By ARTHUR W. EVERETT
NEW YORK (P) -- Harvey M.
Matusow's career as a professional
liar was climaxed this week by his
conviction on five federal counts
of perjury.
He once starred for the govern-
ment as an anti-Communist wit-
ness.
A jury of 10 men and two women
took three hours and 15 minutes
to convict the 29-year-old Matusow
of lying in behalf of 13 second-
string Communist leaders.
Sentencing is set for today. The
maximum is 25 years in prison.
Matusow-ever dramatic-paled,
slumped in his chair and brought
his hand to his eyes as he heard
the verdict.
Short, dark-haired and slimmed
down to 150 from a roly-poly 230
pounds, Matusow chain-smoked
and paced the courthouse corri-
dors while awaiting the verdict
that climaxed his 10-day trial.
United States District Judge
John F. X. McGohey dismissed a

sixth perjury count in the original
indictment before giving the case
to the jury.
The verdict was a complete ex-
oneration of Roy M. Cohn, the
controversial former chief counsel
of the Senate subcommittee once
headed by Sen. Joseph R. Mc-
Carthy (R-Wis.).
Matusow helped convict the 13
second-string Red leaders. Cohn,
then an assistant U.S. attorney,
helped prosecute them.
Then Matusow recanted, said his
original testimony had been shot
through with lies and accused
Cohn of inducing him to bear false
witness to help the case against
the Reds. It was this recantation
and the charge against Cohn that
was the basis for the perjury in-
dictment.
Cohin denied the accusation un-
der oath. He said had he known'
Matusow was a confirmed liar, he
would not have used him as a
witness at the 1952-53 Smith Act
trial of 13 Communists.

I

Extra!

"THE TRADITION THAT IS MICHIGAN"
FILMED IN ANN ARBOR

By JAMES BOW
Courtesy, a low standard of liv-
ing, and a sincere respect for the
United States are impressions car-
ried back from the Philippines by
Prof. George A. Peek, Jr., of the
political science department.
Prof. Peek spent several months
teaching at the Institute of Public
Administration near Manila, under
a four-year program sponsored by
the University of Michigan and the
University of the Philippines
Under the program University
faculty members have taught at
the Institute, whose student body
includes Filipinos and representa-
tives from other Southeast Asian
nations.
Takes Back Close-ups
Peek went to the Philippines in
May and returned this fall, bring-
ing back with him some close-up
views on the customs, problems,
and development of the Philippine
nation.
"Land reform and industrializa-
tion are the chief problems in the
Philippines, as they are in most
other Asian nations," Prof. Peek
emphasized.
"I mean land reform in the
broadest sense," he added, "which
means new techniques in use of the
land and marketing of the pro-
ducts."
Prof. Peek explained that from
30 to 40 per cent of Philippine
farmers, who comprise the major-
ity of the population, are tenant
farmers, paying high rents. Fur-
thermore, timber, which is abun-
dant in the Philippines, is being
freely cut and wasted because of
the lack of conservation practices.
'Stealing The Show'
However, Philippine President
Magasaysay has done much to-
ward land reform, "stealing the
show" from the rapidly diminish-
ing Communist movement which
used land reform as its chief plat-
form.
The Communists, or "Huks" as
they are called, have since dis-
persed into roving bandits in the
mountains of Luzon.
Thus, Prof. Peek illustrated the
relative insignificance of the Com-
munist movement in the Philip-
pines, less of a problem than land
reform or industrialization.
Not Yet Developed
"The Philippines is a country
which potentially can develop, but
has not as yet," were the words
which Prof. Peek used to describe
the present industrial status of the
nation. Textiles, manila rope,
building material, and steel were
listed as possibilities for industrial
expansion.
Another phase of industrializa-
tion is illustrated by a clause from
the Philippine constitution, which
gives Americans business equality'
with the Philippines and utiliza-
tion of the country's resources
until 1974.
Thus, American interests have
a free hand in the Philippines.
Prof. Peek described the clause in
the constitution as giving Ameri-
cans "too much respect."
"Respect" was the word which
Peek used to describe the Philip-
pine attitude toward Americans
living in their country. A Manila
newspaper is run by Americans,
and English is the chief language
in the Philippines.
"Filipinos are exceedingly
gracious," Peek commented. "Even

in class, when a student would
disagree with something I said, he
would express his feeling in a very
roundabout, inoffensive way."
Although Filipinos are ex-
tremely courteous, their general
poverty sometimes brings about
violence, as illustrated by the
gangs of bandits which roam
through the hills.
The average annualy family in-
come in the Philippines is about
$300 a year, and there is also a
problem of unemployment, Prof.
Peek added.
Professors With Servants
However, a Philippine college
professor, who receives a salary
much smaller than an American
professor, can afford several serv-
ants, and someone with a salary of
$6,000 a year can live very, very
well in Manila.
Prof. Peek gave further impres-
sion of Manila, a city which he
compared with a modern metropo-
lis anywhere in the world. Of about
1,000,000 population, Manila sup-
ports newspapers in English and
Tagalog, a M41ay dialect, the offi-
cial language of the region.
"Manila has not yet completely
recovered from World War IV"
Peek said. "It was perhaps second
to Warsaw, in the scope of its
devastation." He went on to de-
scribe modern Manila as a city of
white or light-colored concrete
buildings and wide streets.
Mixed Culture
Chinese merchants carry on a
good deal of the business in the
city, and there is also evidence of
the Spanish influence-Spain hav-
ing ruled the Philippines for 300
years. Land in the Philippines is
still owned by landlords living in
Barcelona and Madrid.
Peek's impressions of the Uni-
versity of the Philippines include
a modern campus, faculty housing,
and an active student interest in
politics.
In summing up his stay in the
Philippines, Prof. Peek remarked,
"I had to work hard to catch up on
Philippine history."
Michigan GOP
Denies Charge
Republican state chairman John
Feikens praised the strength of
the state's party leadership.
Feikens counterattacked a recent
statement by United States Post-
master General Arthur Suminer-
field that charged "Michigan's
government has failed to kep
pace with the government in
Washington. We need stronger
state leadership."
Republicans in the Summerfield
camp have blamed Feikens for the
lack of state Republican strength.
They point out that the Republi-
cans lost this year's spring elec-
tion, one they usually won.
Feikens retorted, "Our strength
at the state level is not weak. We
have a majority of approximately
10 in the Senate and five in the
House and expect an increase in
that number."
He said Republicans expected to
win congressional seats in the
Sixth, Ninth, and Seventeenth Dis-
tricts. "We have our best chance
in the Seventeenth District where
incumbent Martha Griffiths won
by only 3,000 votes in 1954."

.

t

CAMPUS

TALENT

:7 M

Musicians
Singers
SMagicians
* Dancers
Bands
ADVERTISE IN THE STUDENT DIRECTORY
Space in the Yellow Pages Available
Come to the Student Publications Building 3-5 P.M. Thurs., Fri. of this week.

Have you heard the fine I
music of Johnny Horberd?
Johnny appears here every
Friday night
By popular demand again
we bring youDixieland Jazz
It's the Ann Arbor Alley Cats,
Sat., Oct. 29th.
See the NEW LOOK at the LEGION,
RECENTLY REMODELED.
AMERICAN LEGION
1035 S. Main Phone NO 8-6141
Ann Arbor, Michigan
___

1

um

.4

A 144$d

I

The U

ION a dFC rosen

Today and
Saturday

-'inr r

Dial
NO 2-3136

~1

with NANCY DREW

Also "Toot, Whistle, Plunk and Boom"

HILL AUDITORIUM. .. 9:15 P.M.... Friday,

October 5... $1.25 and 90c

A~ R&44#WIf

The U

IN a IC present

... .. _

with NANCY DREW

4

Ticket Sale Sept. 28 -Oct. 5
ThUN IN

Window C... Administration Building

A4 Re4$d0

ancl present

TODAY thru Continuous
SUNDAY JRPlEUf . from 6:30
75c
HE CAME BACK FROM THE PAST... TO FIND
THE NEW MEANING OF HIS FUTUREN!
A
distinguished
screen event...
JOHN BARRYMORE
in Dovid 0. Selznick's production
"A BILL OF
DIVORCEMENT"
KATHARINE hEPBuRN
An iE rUK

t

with NANCY DREW

HILL AUDITORIUM..

.9:15 P.M.. .. Friday,

October 5.... $1.25 and 90c

A~ wfoo

r
-4

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan