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September 17, 1956 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17,1956

r

THdIHGNDIYMNASPEBR1,15

issing, Brickd

lust, Diag Seal
n 'U' Tradi~tion
Torches light the night sky, yelps and shouts pierce the air, and
bodies are smeared with brick dust, paint, and crankcase oil as Uni-
versity honoraries initiate their new members according to long-
standing traditions.
These "long-standing traditions" are also reflected as freshmen
carefully bypass the 'M' seal on the Diag, and as seniors carve their
initials in the tables in the Union cafeteria.
Some traditions have their origins obscured, others may be com-
pletely forgotten and still are threatened with extinction as old land-
marks are torn down and replaced.
Diag Seal
One of the landmarks which still serves as a background for
present tradition is the big blue and gold seal on the Diag, which, if
tread upon by freshmen, promises
to flunk them on their first exam- ited meetings or social events,"
ination. must enter and leave "only by the
The tables in the Union base- North or South entrances," and
ment hold not only the initials of must remove their hats at Union
former seniors, but also the scores dances.
of past football seasons such as Hazing has Disappeared
1903, when the University collected Another tradition, that of fresh-
a total of 565 points, man hazing, disappeared some
Minnesota was the only oppon- years ago, as it has on most cam-
ent to make a touchdown that puses. Signs, in the Union base-
year, blemishing the University's ment, posted by the classes of '11
record with the six points scored and '13 referred to "Foolish freaks
against it. of frightened freshmen," "Rotten
Counterparts Across Nation rabble of rumpled runions," and
Some traditions on the Univer- "Slippery, slimy spawn of sea ser-
sity campus also have their coun- pents."
terparts in similar customs across Customs and traditions still
the nation. playing a strong role in University
The Kissing Rock at West Point life are seen in the spring, when
has its parallel in the arch in the junior and senior honorary socie-
West Engineering Building where ties "tap" new initiates.
women earn their status as coeds The Tappan Oak, just north of
with a midnight kiss, the President's House, is the cen-
According to legend, the lions in ter of ceremonies is Michigamua,
front of the museum are supposed group of campus leaders.
to roar whenever a true virgin One day, while painting them-
walks by. selves copper and rollicking around
This legend is re-told at Michi- campus, they came across the
gan State, where the statue Sparty Tappan Oak. and adopted it as a
is the divine prophet of virginity, symbol of strength.
and at New York University, where Oaks Important to Druids
a versatile sword-on-hip statue Oaks also play an important
is supposed to decapitate the luck- role in the Druid ceremonies. This
less virgin. senior honorary also gathers near
The Union is a stronghold of the Diag among the oaks north of
those traditions which have slowly the General Library.
faded since the "good old days." . Sphinx, a junior honorary, dunk
Separate Ladies' Entrance their initiates in the League foun-
Like the saloons of the "Old tain, and Vulcans, an Engineering
West" and the fashionable conti- honorary, carry flaming torches
nental hostelries, the Union fea- across the University campus.
tured a separate ladies' entrance; Like the ceremonies of the hon-
established by the house rules oraries, another campus tradition
which once hung in the lobby. - reserved for upperclassmen is the
"The Michigan Union is a men's birthday ceremony at a local res-
club. Privileges of women are to taurant.
be the same as in other men's Upon reaching the age of 21,
clubs," states the preamble to sec- students troop down to the restau-
tion 15 of the House Rules, which rant, receive a stein of beer and a
go on to say that women may enter chance to sign their names in the
the Union only to attend "accred- birthday book.
Story by JIM BOW
Pictures by VERN SODEN

WHO? HOW OFTEN? WHY?
Research Institute Studies Answers

Who, What, Where, When, Why
are usually thought of as the
trademark of the newspaperman.
But who does what, how often
and why is the job of the Univer-
sity's Institute for Social Research.
Established in 1946, the Institute
has* two centers: the Research
Center for Group Dynamics and
Survey Research Center.
Survey Research Center has be-
come nationally known for its
work with social science statistics.
Both centers have their begin-
nings in events which occured
before their association with the
University. Survey Research Cen-
ter grew out of an organization
with the United States Department
of Agriculture.
After the war key members of
the research organization were de-
termined to carry on the work but
found it necessary to associate
with an academic institution. The

University provided the necessary
freedom in, combination with an
expanding social science program.
The second of the centers was
founded in 1945 by Prof. Kurt
Lewin at Massachussets Institute
of Technology. Prof. Lewin had
been making progress in develop-
ing experimental techniques.
When Prof. Lewin died, in 1947,
his successors wanted to move to
a University with greater resources.
The group was invited here in
1948.
Prof. Angus Campbell has been
director of Survey Research Cen-
ter since 1948 with Prof. Dorwin
Cartwright heading the Research
Center for Group Dynamics.
The oldest program of Survey
Research is concerned with dy-
namics of major economic decis-
ions made by consumers and busi-

nessmen. Under the direction of
Prof. George Katona the program
has studied the theory that
people's motives, level of informa-
tion and attitudes influence econ-
omic behavior.
Studies have been supported by
various government agencies, pri-
vate business firms and founda-
tions. A grant from the Ford
Foundation provided necessary
economic impetus to the Detroit
Area Study, established in 1951.
Read
Daily
ClAassif ieds.

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-Daily-Harding Williams
MAUREEN HINGERT - Miss
Ceylon of 1955 and third in the
Miss Universe contest of that
year, Miss Hingert visited the
University last summer. The
University frequently hosts in-
ternational visitors.

A

214 S. Fourth Avenue
~~ (O ~Ext ra

eg. 44.95 English Hercules "Tourist"
Ain e vT-r I rg 26-i.ipr

A HISTORY OF FOOTBALL MIGHT-Once an integral part of
the Union, and now hung on the walls, old table tops tell the tale
of football teanu feared by all. Table carving is still a tradition.

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WOE BETIDE THE TRESPASSER -- Freshmen who walk upon the seal before exams, so tradition THE TAPPAN OA i Tappan
would have it, are fated to fail. Seal is also a favorite target for green paint before the annual Oak was planted i honor of
Michigan-Michigan Mate game. formerUnversity Pesident
Henry Tappan by the class of
..________1868.

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FRONT-TYPE BASKET
18"x13"x6" Electrically welded steel wire basket.
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