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September 23, 1956 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-23

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} SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23,1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE. F

,

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE

Varsity Handily
No Injuries in Closed Scrimmage

On tscores

Reserves\

of ices

to

Journalists Inspect New Press Box
Before Varsity Practice at Stadium
By STVE-HILPEN--.

serve

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* MAIN OFFICE
101-107 S. Main St:
* NICKELS ARCADE
330 S. State Street
* NEAR 'ENGINE ARCH'
1108 South University
*PACKARD-BROCKMAN
1923 Packard
* WHITMORE LAKE
9571 N. Main St.

By DAVE GREY
Daily Sports Editor
Michigan's final full-scale
scrimmage yesterday saw Coach
Bennie Ooosterbaan's first and
second teams easily outgain the
reserves, 40-9, amidst downpours
in an almost empty Michigan Sta-
dium.
The blue-shirted w i n n e r s
showed a consistently strong at-
tack as the Wolverines continued
pointing their efforts for next Sat-
urday's home opener with UCLA.
No Serious Injuries
Of particular note was that
Michigan came out of the closed-
to-the-public practice without
any major additions to the injury
list.
"We were relieved that there
were no serious injuries," com-
mented Oosterbaan afterwards,
with a grin. As to the performance,
he added, "There were some rough
and bright spots."
Scoring for the first and sec-
ond squads was divided all on run-
ning plays, between fullback John
Herrnstein with two, and one each
for tailbacks Bob Ptacek and Jim
Pace, right halfback Terry Barr,
and fullback Jim Byers.
The White-shirted reserves were
unable to move until the last 15
minutes of regulation play, when
fullback Gene Sisinyak scored on
a line plunge.
A safety was added on the fol-
lowing kick off, as deep man Pace

you

Associate Sports Edtior
Michigan's mammoth new press
box, or "Communications Center,"
if you will, was unveiled to the
working press before the varsity
football scrimmage yesterday af-
ternoon at Michigan Stadium.
The four-tier structure, which
makes its official debut at next
Saturday's UCLA opener, went
through a "dry run" testing before
over 200 journalists and other
guests.
Not Just a 'Press Box'
"Communications Center" is
probably a well chosen title for
this edifice. "Press Box" doesn't
do it justice.
The first tier houses a private
dining room for 'U' President Har-
lan Hatcher and his guests, plus
an ultra-modern kitchen. The
second tier is exclusively for the
press and statistical departments.
One flight above is an open-air
deck with accommodations for 38
photographers and movie and TV
cameras.
The top tier contains 17 sound-
proofed, and fully wired radio and
TV broadcasting booths, dark
rooms for photographers, and a
special box for President Hatcher.
You can't help knowing its be-
longs to Michigan. It's big, it's

beautiful, and it's decorated in
Maize and Blue. It should estab-
lish a precedent among the people
who build press boxes.
Those fortunate enough to at-
tend the preview yesterday were
greeted by Athletic Director H. 0.
"Fritz" Crisler and President
Hatcher. A buffet luncheon fol-
lowed, after which customary
speeches were heard.
Crisler noted that the Stadium's
seating capacity has been swelled
to 101,001 because of the elevated
structure of the box. "And only
one person knows where that one
extra seat is," said the beaming
Crisler. "That's me."
Brandon, Etter Speak
Public Relations Director Ar-
thur L. Brandon and Athletic
Publicity Director Les Etter also
addressed remarks to the group.
Etter, who is responsible for the
coordination of the Center's ac-
tivities, told of the elaborate com-
munication system within the
Center.
Besides the press, many other
personalities familiar to Michigan
were present. Ty Tyson, who
aired the first radio broadcast,
from Michigan Stadium, almost
30 years ago, marveled at the
new facilities.
Mayor Paul Goebel of Grand

Rapids, a former 'M' footballer,
was present. Harry Kipke, who
coached Michigan in the thirties, I
renewed some acquaintances at
the gathering. And Fred Stabley,
who handles sports publicity for
Michigan State, took some friend-
ly kidding, but admitted that
Michigan's set-up was "great."
Students and Ann Arbor towns-
people will get their chance to
see the Center at the open house,
Oct. 11, from 2-5 p.m. Dedication
ceremonies will take place Oct. 26.

THE BIG THREE-Pictured above are (l. to r.) Head Coach
Bennie Oosterbaan, Line Coach Jack Blott, and Backfield Coach
Don Ribinson. After yesterday's scrimmage, they have one week
left to prepare Michigan for its season opener with UCLA.

I

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was caught after fumbling on the
goal line, and thrown into the end
zone by end Gordie Morrow.
Score Early
But the offensive power was
mainly with the Blues, with two
touchdowns being scored in each
of the first two quarters. As the
rains came, the attacks seemed to
bog down, and play was not as
sharp.
Michigan used its multiple of-
fense of single wing and T-forma-
tion that gave opportunity for
some impressive runs by Ptacek,
Pace, Herrnstein, and Barr. Quar-
terback Jim Maddock, Ptacek, and
Pace also did most of the passing
with good results.
Maddock and sophomore John
Spidel did the signal calling for

the Blues, after Jim Van Pelt was
shaken up very early ins the first
quarter.
Van Pelt Stays Out
Van Pelt sat out the remainder
of the game on the sidelines, al-
though Oosterbaan said that in
a real contest the stocky junior
would have been able to resume
play.
Of the regulars, only center
Gene Snider was definitely unable
to compete in the practice. Sni-
der's bone bruise on the leg still
is bothering him..
Freshman Coach Wally Weber
remarked that it was the first time
he could remember in 25 years
that Michigan has had three full
scrimmages in the Stadium before
the opening game of the season.

Miss Stewart Captures
UT 1 A-d

U.S,. Amateu
INDIANAPOLIS &-Sober faced
Marlene Stewart, who carries gal-
lons of determination in her pint-
sized figure, made one of golf's
great comebacks yesterday to be-
come the first Canadian-born
winner of the U.S. Women's Ama-
teur golf championship.
Marlene, four down at one stage,
o v e r t o o k 17-year-old Joanne
Gunderson of Kirkland, Wash.,
and won, 2 and 1, in the 36-hole
final.
Opponent Tires
Miss Stewart won in an un-
spectacular manner from a tiring
and slightly bewlidered opponent
who turned out, after all, to be
just a precocious 17-year-old high
school girl after looking like a
golfing wonder earlier this week.
Marlene, born in Alberta and
reared in Fonthill, Ont., is the first
player to take the title out of this
country since England's Pam Bar-
ton won in 1936. Although she is
the first Canadian winner, the
championship trophy went to
Canada once before. Scottish-born
Dorothy Campbell won in 1909 as
British champion and in 1910 as a
Canadian entry.
Comes From Behind
Miss Gunderson, the U. S. Ju-
nior Girl champion who hoped to
become the second youngest wo-
men's champion, went from four-
up to even in the afternoon round
with the rapidity of a descending
roller coaster. As her lead disap-
peared before Marlene's rock-
steady shooting, Joanne didn't
seem to know what to do.
Miss Stewart, one down at the
end of the morning round and un-
steady during the early part of{
the afternoon, just kept shooting
pars until Joanne beat herself.
Neither player shot the kind of
golf they had displayed =earlier
this week over the windy 6,340
yard Meridian Hills course. For
the morning round, Miss Gunder-
son had 38-38-74 and Miss

ur G~ott1I tue'
Stewart shot 38-39-77 to trail by
one hole. In the afternoon Joanne
went out in 39 and Marlene in 40
before the tide changed.
. Miss Stewart, 22 years old and a
tournament golfer since she was
14, won the British Women's
championship in 1953 and the
Canadian Women's open four
times. Last spring she won the
U. S. Women's intercollegiate title
as a representative of Rollins Col-
lege.
Irish-State Tilt
To Be Televised
In Midwest
CHICAGO P) - A midwestern
telecast of the Michigan State-
Notre Dame football game at
South Bend, Ind., Oct. 20, via NBC
was announced today by Big Ten
Commissioner K. L. (Tug) Wilson.
The game long has been a sell-
out. A week later, Oct. 27, Okla-
homa's invasion of Notre Dame
will be televised nationally by
NBC.
Five games involving Big Ten
teams will be televised regionally.
The Indiana-Iowa game, Sept. 29,
will open the series. Games for
three other dates, Oct. 13, Nov. 3
and Nov. 17 have not yet been
announced.

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