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September 23, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-23

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SUNDAY, SEPTEA MIt 23,1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1958 TUE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREI~

Union Open House Draws
Crowds Despite Showers
By VERNON NAHRGANG
A crowd of curious people Wan-
dered in and out, up and down
the floors of the Union yesterday,
stopping to see a swimming exhi-
bition, a half-dozen sports cars
and the "best-dressed" dogs on
campus.
The occasion was the Union's
open house, now an annual affair,
where newcomers and oldcomers
get a free look at the facilities
housed in the red brick building. lX'
It was outside the building
where the most consistent crowdsC
were found, standing around star-
ing at the brightly-colored sports 4. {*s
cars with blue and silver "Please F 5 4
do not handle cars" signs on them.w
Showers Brief

Only a few brief showers halted
the onrush of auto onlookers, but
nothing stopped the intermittent
blasts from ."loudspeakers luring
passersby into the Union.
"Stick around awhile!" the
speaker blared. "There's much
more to see at your Michigan Un-
ion Open House."
And, a few minutes later: "La-
dies and gentlemen, the dogs are
beginning to arrive!"
So, as at a carnival, everyone
took the barker's advice and
headed for the ballroom, to see
the fraternities' best-dressed dogs.
After a short exhibition of the
songs the brothers of Sigma Phi
Epsilon liked to sing "in the
friendly confines of our house,"
the two dogs were exposed to the
audience.
Show Farcial
With the admission that the
show was "a bigger farce than
planned," the emcee presented the
Gold Cup to Dagmar, out of Trig-
on, judged the "best-dressed".
Second prize went to the only
other entrant, Cesar of Phi Sigma
Delta, who sported the Ivy-League
look: repp tie and a belt in back.
Slightly more successful yester-
day afternoon was the showing of
the best-dressed human beings.
There the local clothiers showed
a polite audience just what is in
style these days.
Most people eren't impressed.
Many thought last year's show
was better, and one coed summed
it up with, "Not very good. (Yawn)
But at least I know what I should
bewearing now."
Couples Brave
While the shows were going on
and while dance instructors gave
free lessons, a local dixieland corn-
bo bleated out some dixieland in
the North Cafeteria, where a few
brave couples danced and many
more were content to watch.
On two floors young ladies
passed out free drinks (ginger ale)

MICHIFISH SWIM-Delicate parasols rise from the water.

Eradication
Of Poverty
Is Forseen
"In gearing public welfare to
our changing economy, we mustc
raise standards in public assist- i
ance and Social Security," a Uni-
versity of Michigan public wel-
fare administrator said in an1
address to the Northeast Regional
Conference of the American Pub-t
lic Welfare Association here yes-
terday.-
Prof. Wilbur J. Cohen explained,
with the growing national income,
"We can afford to improve our
public welfare programs. We must
readjust our sights to the steady
growth of our economy," he add-
ed, "and eradicate the depression'
psychology of a restrictive econ-
omy."
Profesor Cohen also suggested
that poverty can be abolished "in
our country in our lifetime." This
is possible, he said, because pov-
erty could be abolished at the
cost of about $10 billion and this
is the sum that the economy is
going to increase per year cumu-
latively in the future.
"Can't we start to think about
how to eradicate poverty without
taking anything away from any-
body?" Professor Cohen asked.
Ixi conclusion, the professor said
that the people in public welfare
must be willing to pave the way
to do the hard jobs others are
unprepared or unwilling to do.
"There are many difficult tasks
ahead of us," he said, "but pro-
gress is a force which is changing
the face of the globe, and we
believe that want can be abolished
and poverty eradicated."
Professor Cohen is professor of
Public Welfare Administration in
the U-M School of Social Work.I
May Sponsor
Cinema Guild
Cinema Guild has announced
that petitioning is now open for
campus organizations wishing to
sponsor films.
Interested groups may obtain
petitions in Quonset Hut A and
must submit completed forms by
Friday. Interviews will be held next
Saturday.
The Guild also announced an
opening as assistant manager. The
positions entales the booking of
films and supervision of the Archi-
tecture Auditorium staff. Appli-
cants should be planning to re-
main at the University for at least
two years. Petitions for the posi-
tion may be obtained from Mrs.
Callaghan, 1020 Administration
Bldg.

By JAMES SMITH
Few students at the University
consider the staggering job done ,
by the University Health Service.
Last year during the regular
session alone the Health Service
received 120,490 clinic visits. The
largest number of calls paid to
the Health Service was for the
purpose of X-ray examinations.
Although each student entering
the University is given a chest
X-ray, last year 10 students were'
found to have contracted tubercu-
losis.
Acute respiratory infections are
the cause of the next greatest
number of visits to the Health
Service.
Dorm .radio
Hams Contact
. Whole World
By EDWARD GERULDSEN !
"CQ...CQ...CQ...CQDX
.. From W8PGW, University of
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan . ..."
... W8PGW . . .This is HR1BG
in Honduras .. How do youl
copy? ..."
". . . HR1BG . . . This is W8-
PGW . . . Your signals are Q5
and S9..."
So it goes at a typical broad-
casting session of the South Quad
Amateur Radio Club, call letters
W8PGW, in their shack up on the
ninth floor of South Quad.
W8PGW, broadcasting at 120
watts power, has contacts through-
out the world-from Canada to
South America, from Europe to
California. The log gives evidence
of transmissions to at least 18
countries outside the United
'States, including such faraway
places as Nicaragua, Honduras,
Guatemala, Brazil, Scuador, Uru-
guay and Venezuela in South Am-
erica, and England, Austria, Ger-
many and Belgium in Europe.
Moreover Northern R h o d e s i a,
South Africa, New Zealand, Cuba,
Trinidad, and of course the United
States are on the list.
The station is equipped for both
voice and code transmission, and
is a member of the Amateur Radio
Relay League, a world-Wide or-
ganization of "ham" operators.
Though not in operation at the
moment, WSPGW is almost cer-
tain to go on the air sometime this
semester. Bru'ce Bevelheimer, '57,
was president of last year's club,
which included about 15 members.
A number of the members are ham
operators on their own as well,
with their own stations at home.
The club uses equipment loaned
by it's members. The transmitter
used last year was owned by Mar-
shall Badt, then a senior in the
pharmacy school. The receiver
was the property of Al Krafve,
'57E. Badt's private call letters are
W8FBV.

The third largest cause of
dent calls is gastrointestinal
set. Last year both of these

stu-
up-
were

at their lowest in five years.
Along with the increase of stu-
dents which it must serve, the
Health Service is increasing its
facilities in every possible way.
They have widely increased i
their consultant service, their
pharmacy, and particularly in
their X-ray department. Last Mon-
day the Health Service X-rayed
the astonishing number of 2500
student:.
Never before have they been able;
to X-ray more than 1500 students
in one day.
The Health Service has been ex-1
panding, but not building. They
are now overcrowded, and it is
predicted that the present Health
Service building will soon be inade-
quatc.
The fourth floor, previously used
for storage space, has now been
converted for office use.
Also in the line of expansion, theI
outpatient service is now immed-
iately available in the infirmary
fram 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Monday
through Friday, and from 1 p.m.
to 6 p.m. on Saturdays, Sundays,
and holidays.
This service is at a slight extra
1 cost to the student because of the
necessity of keeping a doctor.

HEALTH SERVICE:
Need for Medical Aid
Leads To Overcrowding

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SPORTS CAR DISPLAY-Dazzling motor awes onlookers.

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to all comers so they wouldn't go
home thirsty.
Also open were the new Union
Student Offices, bare but for a
few desks and television facilities.
Climaxing the afternoon were
some marching band members
who actually rang the rafters
(with five trombones, five trum-
pets) with a few "Fight!" arrange-
ments.
Even the tired audience joined

in with a couple hearty "Fight!'s"
before taking a last look at the
rain-spattered, bright red sports
cars and calling it a day.
For those who didn't get as
much as they expected for noth-
ing, the arternoon was not spent
in vain. They could take home
free calendars of events for the
school year, listing, among other
events, all coming Union dances.

11

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