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September 30, 1955 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-09-30

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 90, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3G, 1955 TINE MICHIGAN DAILY

FULFILLS GREAT NEED:
New Kresge Medical Library Opened

-News Photo Service
THE NEW KRESGE MEDICAL LIBRARY was opened officially
yesterday. Inspecting the new building were (left to right) P. 0.
Cleveland, Administrative Assistant of University Hospital who
is in charge of the Kresge Medical Research Institute; Stanley
Kresge, trustee of the Kresge Foundation; Charles Kennedy,
regent; and David Kronick, divisional librarian in charge of the
new library.

The University's new Kresge
Medical Library officially opened
its door yesterday.
Financed by a $600,000 gift
from the Kresge Foundation, the
library fulfills "a long standing
need", said Medical School Dean
A. C. Furstenberg. An inspection
party of Kresge trustees were tak-
en through the building.
The party consisted of Founda-
tion . members Stanley Kresge,
Amos Gregory and Howard Bald-
win. Representing the University
were President Harlan H. Hat-
cher, Vice-Presidents Wilbur K.
Pierpont and Marvin L. Niehuss,
Dean Furstenberg, Director of Un-
iversity Relations Arthur L. Bran-
don and chief librarian F. H. Wag-
man.
- Kresge Unable to Attend
Sebastian S. Kresge, president
of the Foundation, was unable to
attend the opening. The inspec-
tion party was received by newly
appointed librarian David Kro-
nick.
The new medical library ad-
joins the Kresge Medical Research
Building. It is considered one of
the finest medical libraries in the
country, and provides space for
over 150,000 medical volumes.
Formerly, medical books had
been divided between the General
Library and University hospital,
with same volumes being stored
in the School of Business Admin-
istration.
Modern Decor
The new library is furnished
in modern decor, wit:i a color mo-
tif of light blue and persimmon.
The atmosphere is. informal.
Screened desks are provided for
privacy, but there are also furni-
ture ,groupings for small discus-
sions.
There are four stack levels, two
below, one on and one above the
main reading room level. T h e
reading room accomodates 200
students. Special conference rooms
accomodates 200 students. Special
conference rooms dre available
along with 80 carrells for indi-
vidual studying.
Contains Rare Book Room
The library also contains a Rare
Book Room. Adjacent to the main
reading room, ,its glass display
cases contain some of the Medi-
cal School's 2000 rare books.

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CR ESCO'S
DISTINCTIVE NEW
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Velvety corduroy
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Different ... smart
S. good-looking!
In eight handsome
new colors. Mix-
match t h i s hand-
some CRESCO cas-
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slacks and you'll
have a whole ward-
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C OR DU ROY
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'U'.Students1
'Light Up'
In Library
Increased tuition and an extra
walk to Yost Field House for foot-
ball tickets weren't the only sur-
prises in store this fall for the
more than 20,000 students on cam-
pus.
A most unexpected sight was
found in the main library in the
first floor study hall. Posted on
the door is a sign "Smoking per-
mitted."
When the incredulous student,
thinking that someone has made
a grave error, peers through the
glass door, he sees long rows of
deep, glass ash trays.
To confirmheven further that
the days of the cigarette breaks
in the salmon-colored, window-
less cubicle are gone forever, the
student observes fellow smokers
through a somewhat hazy atmos-
phere lost in their books, absently
puffing away.
The innovation not only serves
the pleasurers and comfort of the
student smoker, but also will pre-
vent violations in the no smok-
ing areas. With the high ceiling
and many windows providing ade-
quate ventilation, the study hall
becomes an appropriate place 'for
the smoking populace.
For the smoke-allergic student,
books in this study hall can be
checked out of the library or used
in other rooms.
The non-smoking student, how-
ever, will by no means be neglect-
ed in the future. When the new
library is built on campus and
smoking is permitted on every
floor of the building, officials will
certainly remember to set aside a
room with a 'sign:
"Non-smokers permitted."
Community
Life Theme
Of Program
International Students at the
University and opportunities for
them to know American family,
church and community life was
the theme of an N.B.C. radio
broadcast over Station WWJ, De-
troit, from 10:15 to 10:30 p.m.,
Wednesday.
Interviewed Rumman
Mary Margaret McBride inter-
viewed Doris Reed Rumman Pro-
testant Counselor for Internation-
al Students at the University and
Janice Miller, new Administrative
Assistant at the International
Center and chairman of the In-
ternational Students' Project for
the United Church Women of Mi-
chigan.
The program is the first in a
series of six on "Citizens in Ac-
tion" which N.B.C. is scheduling
to demonstrate what the United
Church Women of America can
achieve by united action in local
Communities.
Unique Program
The unique Protestant counsel-
ing program which developed at
the University in 1947 to "serve
students of all faiths and cul-
tures" is spotlighted in this first
program of the series to suggest
to people of other states how they
may be of help to students from
other lands.
The United Church Women of
Michigan are among the chief
supporters of this counseling ser-

vice to students from abroad,
which is under the direct auspices
of the Protestant Foundation for
International Students.

Crash!
DETROIT UP .- Mrs. De-
lores Hlaburne told a surprised
traffic court her husband was
"quite pleased" when she dam-
aged the family car.
She was charged with inter-
fering with traffic July 30 when
the car crashed into another
driven by Henry Kwiecinski
"He was quite pleased," she
replied. "In the first place he
was pleased because I was not
hurt. And in the second place
he was pleased because ... well,
you see, he's a car salesman and
he sold Mr. Wwiecinski's new
car on the spot."
She won a suspended sen-
tence.
Kronick Lauds
Arrangement
'Of Library
"The new medical library pro-
vides the comfort of a living room
with the customary regimentation
of arrangement sometimes found
in libraries," said newly-appoint-
ed divisional librarian David Kro-
nick.
Kronick, whose baby the new
Kresge Medical Library will be,
is a graduate of Western Reserve
University. He received his A.B.
from ,there in 1939 and took his
Bachelor of Library Science a year
later.
During the war, Kronick was a
medical supply officer with the
302nd Station Hospital, serving
in England, France and Germany.
He was discharged with the rank
of Captain in the Medical Service
Corps.
Returning to Western Reserve,
Kronick served as Medical School
librarian from 1947 - 1950. From
1951 to 1953 he attended the Uni-
versity of Chicago Graduate Li-
brary School, completing the basic
requirements toward his Ph.D.
For the past two years, Kronick
was Armed Forces Medical Librar-
ian in the reference department in
Washington, D.C. He is a mem-
ber of the American Library As-
sociation, the Medical Library As-
sociation and the History of Sci-
ence Society.
Schedule First
Play of Year
"The Good Woman of Setzuan"
by Berthold Brecht, will be the
first major production by the
Speech department for the fall
semester.
In addition to two major produc-
tions, the Speech department
plans two Speech laboratory play-
bills per semester.
The laboratory play production
division of the Speech deparment
permits students studying drama-
tics to act and t odirect and pro-
duce actual plays. .
The productions include origi-
nal student written plays, ex-
perimental plays, and plays repre-
sentative of various eras in the
history of drama.
Performances of Brecht's play,
which will be directed by Prof.)
William Halstead, will take place
November 9 -12 in the Lydia Men-
delssohnn theater.

Students Offered Special
Rate for Seven DAC Plays
Shephard Walsh, Dramatic Art
Center's business manager, has some special events during tt
announced that a low-priced year. The first of these added at
membership will be made avail- tractions will be a program c
able to University students. folk music presented by John Ja
A season pass to the seven cob Mills on Wednesday, Oct.
plays scheduled for presentation Welsh pointed out that tt
this year will be sold to students Center will be selling blocks c
for $5.00, half the price of regu- seats to any organization requesi
lar memberships. ing them, thus offering grou
Membership cards will not be such as fraternities and sororitie
valid unless they bear the stud- a chance to economize.
ent's signature and they are not From Oct. 3 - 9 the DAC wi
to be transferred. conduct its annual membershi
Want Student Support drive. For each twenty membe
Stressing the fact that many ships sold the Center will gi'
students seem to believe the DAC one free season pass to the sale
is a faculty approved and support- man. Any students,'interested
ed organization, Welsh emphasiz- participating in the drive me
ed the fact that the Center wants do so by contacting Prof. Richar
student support. He added that C. Boys of the University's Eng
suggestions regarding such mat- lish Department,
ters as play selection were wel
come.
The Center's tentative playbill
for this season includes works by
Moliere, Chekov, Dryden, Anouilh
Engin Council
Chooses Advisor
During the year the DAC also
plans a series of evening sym- A new member of the Facul
posiums especially for students. Advisory Board, whose idenyi
At these meetings, topics of cur- will be revealed at a latter dat
rent interest in the theater will be
discussedwas chosen yesterday at the fix
Plan Special Events meeting of the Engineering Cou:
Welsh also announced that the cil.
organization intends to sponsor

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

r

North Campus
Construction
Progressing
Present progress in North
Campus construction includes
work on the wind tunnel of the
Aeronautics laboratory, a nuclear
reactor, a printing building and
the automotive laboratory, ac-
cording to Lynn W. Fry, supervis-
ing architect in the Plant Depart-
ment.
In addition, landscape work is
being carried on and roads, side-
walks, and lighting are being in-
stalled.
North Campus buildings which
have been completed and are in
use are the Cooley Engineering
Research Building, the Central
Service and Stack Building of the
General Library into which books
were moved at the beginning of
the year, and the library bindery.
The Phoenix building with
"caves" housing the radioactive
source is in use with the third
floor yet to be finished. Also, 100
married students apartments have
been completed and were occupied
at the beginning of the present
semester.
Fry added that plans have been
completed and bids submitted for
an additional 300 apartments and
the project will be considered at
the meeting of the Board of Re-
gents Friday.
It is expected that the wind
tunnel will be finished by Decem-
ber 1, and the automotive lab by
the first of next year.
Plans are also underway for a
depressed reflecting pool approxi-
mately 100 by 300 feet to-be sur-
rounded by the Cooley and Phoe-
nix Buildings and the Automotive
laboratory.

11

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Phone: NO 3-2481
Open Saturdays until 5 P.M.
except home games.

AWBDEAiGdAhs.CmAr I
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Store Hours Tuesday thru Saturday 9 to 5:30-
Monday 9, to 8:30

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NEW SHIPMENTS of
USETEXTB KS
arriving daily!
NEW BOOKS IF YOU PREFER

For that hard-to find

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BOB GRAHAM, Mgr.

No lonesome leftovers
when
buy
LETTER P4PERS
Why sendout mis-matched
letters (they make a poor
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