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September 21, 1955 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ADD OR SUBTRACT ROOMS:
Unistrut Buildings Prove Useful

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The day is not far in the future
when' a homeowner will be able
to add and subtract rooms to and
from his house, or take. it down,
take the parts to a new location,
and put it back up again.
All he will need are a wrench,
a screwdriver and a rubber-head-
ed mallet.
These are the tools used by 20
University architectural students
to construct the new Architectur-
al Research Laboratory next to
the College of Architecture and
Design.
Suggested by Unistrut
The building was suggested by
Unistrut Corporation of Wayne,
Mich., for a high degree of dura-
bility, uexibility, expandability,
demountability and re-usability,
employing only standardized parts.
Six years ago, Unistrut asked
the Unifersity's help in designing
a complete structure built from
the company's standardized steel
lengths called struts.
These come in any desired
length, determined by a struc-
ture's design, and can ge fastened
together by a unique system of
nuts and bolts to form wall
frames.
Any Material for Walls
Just about any material can be
used between the frames for
walls. In the new Architectural
Research Lab, there are asbestos
# board, plastic-glass, glass, webbed
steel and plywood walls.
The new building is the first of
its kind, boasting a uniqueness in
the construction of the floors and
ceilings which make use of a new
concept of construction called the
space-frame system.
Experimenting with this new
system was the main purpose of
Unistrut Corporation's president,
9'Charles W. Attwood, in sponsoring
the research leading to the lab's
development and donating mate-
rial for its construction.
Like Inverted Pyramids
The space-frame system uses
rconventional roofs resting on
beams or trusses shaped like in-
verted pyramids, giving a third di-
mensional effect to roofs and
floors. The space-frame is made
up of struts- of equal length that
can be used interchangeably as
f either the sides, bottom or top of
the. pyramide.
The result of this kind of con-
struction from standardized parts

1955-56
UNIVERSITY MUSIC SOCIETY

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CE

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Seventy-Seventh Annual Choral., Union. Series

ZINKA MILANOV, Soprano
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor
THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA .
GEORGE SZELL, Conductor

. Tuesday, Octobr I1
Monday, October 24
Sunday, November 6

I

FLEXIBILITY -- The new Architectural Research Laboratory was built on a unique principle of
construction. It was build of standardized parts by 20 architectural students using wrenches,
screw-drivers and rubber-headed mallets. The roofs and ceilings are constructed of "space-frames,"
which provide an unusual strength. Rooms can easily be added to or subtracted from the experi-
mental building.

NATHAN MILSTEIN, Violinist

Monday, November 14

N1

is simplicity in building and an
effectiveness that allows t h e
space-frame roof to absorb loads
far in excess of the strength of its
individual parts.
Though called- a two-story
structure, the new lab is technical-
ly only a one-story building with
a mezanine, according to Prof. C.
Theodore Larson of the architec-
ture college. Prof. Larson headed.
the research team that devised
and built the lab.
Block '
Fall signup for the Block 'M'
section will take place during
registration from 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. in Barbour Gym.
All freshmen and transfer
students are eligible, as well as
returning upperclassmen. Sen-
idrs will be given preference in
signing up.
Approximately 300 more
,members are needed. Forty ush-
ers will also be needed and
should sign up at this time.

Development Council Studies
Financial Resources Problem'

ROBERT SHAW CHORALE AND ORCHESTRA
Tuesday, November 22
ROBERT SHAW, Conductor

l

T h e University Development
Council was set up in the fall of
1953 to help solve two of the Uni-
versity's most insistent post-war
problems, increasing enrollment
and decreasing prospects for ade-
quate funds.
At present, the Development
Council is focusing its attention
on the problem of funds. The Uni-
versity faces a situation common
to most state-supported institu-
tions-one is which legislative ap-
propriations cover only operating
expenses and few wealthy bene-
factors exist to finance additional
needs.
The three-fold aim of the Coun-
cil is: 1) to assist in University
relations, especially those aspects
which will lead to improved finan-
cial support;
2) to stimulate the interest of
alumni in University development

and to facilitate this development
by a study of the institution's
needs, and 3) to coordinate the
University's special fund raising
program.
Research Institute
Develops Missile
The joint efforts of one of the
country's pioneer university engi-
neering research departments and
one of America's aircraft manu-
facturers have developed the new
United States Air Force "BOM-
ARC" Supersonic Guided Missile.
The University's Engineering
Research Institute, as a subccon-
tractor to Boeing Aircraft Com-
pany, participated in early studies
on defense weapons concepts and
built research models.

VIENNA CHOIR BOYS (2:30 p.m.) .
TORONTO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
. . . . . . . . . . W edi
SIR ERNEST MacMILLAN, Conductor
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN. Pianist .

Sunday, January 15

II

nesday, February
Thursday, March

22

III

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U

VIRTUOSI di ROMA

. . -

- Tuesday, March 13
.. . MondayMarch 19

;1'

WALTER GIESEKING, Pianist .

..................... ... .. . ........ ...,.....~.... vv..................r.v......................*. .........:::r:.::v.
- .i l"a ".:~n fk> SSr r..4:i$":uS"i

SEASON TICKETS: Remaining unclaimed seats in Block A, $17.00; Block B,
$14.00; Block C, $12.00; Block D, $10.00.
Tenth Annual Extra Concert Series
OBERNKIRCHEN CHILDREN'S CHOIR Monday, October 17
EDITH MOLLER, Conductor
LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

II

EVERYBODY is talking
about the Accessories
they found for their room at
CHESTER ROBERTS GIFTS'

HERBERT von KARAJAN, Conducto
BOSTON POPS TOUR ORCHEST
ARTHUR FIEDLER, Conductor

. Wednesday, November9
RA . Sunday, January 8
. Wednesday, February 15

MYRA HESS, Pianist

9 9 . .

TERESA STICH-RANDALL,

Soprano

Friday, March 9

SEASON
Block D,

TICKETS:
$5.00

Block A, $8.50; Block B, $7.00; Block C, $6.00

Annual Christmas Concerts

"MESSIAH" (Handel) . .

ELLEN FAULL, Soprano
LILLIAN CHOOKASIAN, Cc
HOWARD JARRATT, Tenor
TICKETS: 75c and 50c (eith

* . . December 3-and 4,1955
DONALD GRAMM, Bass
CHORAL UNION and ORCHESTRA
LESTER McCOY, Conductor

)ntralto

her concert). On sale beginning October 15.

Sixteenth Annual Chamber Music Festival

BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET
Assisted by ROBERT COURTE, Viola

. February 17, 18, 19, 1956
On sale beginning October 15.

SEASON TICKETS:

$3.50 and $2.50.

Large Selection of Room and
Desk Lamps.. $2.19 to $5.00

Black Wrought Iron Book Case .. . $3.95

{
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Largest Selection of Greeting Cards On Campus
Featuring HALLMARK - NORCROSS and STUDIO CARDS

Sixty-third Annual May Festival
SIX CONCERTS . . . . . . . . . May 3, 4, 5,6,1
The Philadelphia Orchestra, EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor, University
Choral Union, THOR JOHNSON, Guest Conductor, and LESTER McCOY,
Associate Conductor. Festival Youth Chorus, MARGUERITE HOOD, Con-
ductor. Soloists to be announced.

956

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