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September 25, 1955 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIUHIAN DAILY SUNDAY, SEP

TEMBER 25, 1955

CAPTAIN RICHARD D. ZERN,-USN

Captain Zern Will Teach
In NROTC Program
Capt. Richard D. Zern of the
United States Navy assumed his he was with the Atlantic Fleet as
duties this fall as professor of an Aide and Chief of Staff to
Naval Science at the University. Rear Admiral Walter E. Moore.
Before coming to the University Went To College
He was graduated from the
DAC .lansHigh School Academy of the
DACL~ Plans Western Illinois State Teacher's
College, Macomb, Ill, and went to
Seven Plays the College for one year.
S After graduation from the
In 1United States Naval Academy in
n "95 1927, Captain Zern attended the
Naval War College; the Post-
Ann Arbor's professional arena Graduate School of the Line,
theater, the Dramatic Arts Center, United States Naval Academy and
will offer a varied program during the Fleet Anti-Submarine War-
its 1955-56 season. fare School in Key West, Fla.
A tentative list released by the He has also served numerous
Center's board of directors includes duty stations on battleships, cruis-.
six plays with another still to be ers and a submarine tender as well
announced. as being in the Office of the Chief
"Thieves Carnival" by French of Naval Operations,
playwright Jean Anouilh, a comedy Serves in War
which enjoyed success when it was During the Second World War,
produced off Broadway last year he served on the cruiser MARBLE-
has been scheduled to open the HEAD in the United States'
season on Oct. 21. Asiatic Fleet, and spent the last
Other productions will include three years of the War in the
Anton Chekov's "The Seagull," Western Pacific on the so-called
"Breakup" by the Scandinavian "fast battleships" such as the
playwright Krog, and a work by WASHINGTON and IOWA.
Moliere which has not yet been He has also toured with the
Asen dSixth Fleet, participated in the
Also included on the Center's Far East and Indian ocean area
program will be a twin bill pre- opratnd prior ote Krea
senting W. B. Yeats' version of operations prior to the Korean
Sophocles, "Oedipus Rex" and conflict.
Yeats' original play "Purgatorio." Some of his awards include the
Dryden's work entitled "All for Legion of Merit with the Combat
Love" is also scheduled for pres- "V", the Navy Unit Commenda-
entation. tion, American Defense Service
The plays will run for three Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Area Medal
weeks each at the Masonic Temple. and the Philippine Liberation
Ribbon with two stars.
Captain Zern is married and his
son Richard is scheduled to enter
the University as a Junior this
fall.
Change center
Social Plans
This summer saw an innovation
in the International Center and
the International Students' Asso-
ciation, allowing the students
themselves to plan their social
events rather than go through the
University administrative board.
President John A. Wallwork
from Great Britain and vice-presi-
dent B. V. Govindaraj from India
were elected last June on a pro-
gram including that "Internation-
al Students Association take over
all International Center social ac-
tivities and carry out an effective
program with thhe financial as-
sistance of the Universty"
On July 1, the International
Center, a University administrative
branch, announced its reorganiza-
tion which included a relinquishing
of the planning and conducting of
a socialy program (or foreign stu-
dents.
Another important change was
the doubling of counseling staff
time available to the students.

Honor- Roll
Dedication
Set Today
Dedication ceremonies for the
Washtenaw County memorial hon-
or roll, containing the names of
498 servicemen who died in two
wars and the Korean fighting,
will be held at 2 p.m. today in the
main lobby of Washtenaw's new
courthouse.
A $1,700 plaque, erected and
sponsored by the Washtenaw
County chapter of the Gold Star
Mothers and the Washtenaw
County Council of Veterans, was
installed in the lobby Thursday.
Invocation at the dedication will
be delivered by the Rev. Fr. Joseph
P. McElgunn of St. Thomas Cath-
olic Church in Ann Arbor, chap-
lain at University Hospital and
the William H. Maybury Sanitor-
ium at Northville.
The Rev. Glenn E. Baumann of
St. James Evangelical and Refor-
med Church of Dearborn, a former
chaplain with the Fifth Marine
Division in the South Pacific, will
deliver the main address.
Mr.hBaumann was chaplain with
the 28th Marines of the Fifth
Division, a unit in which many
Ann Arbor men served.
He was present at the famous
flag-raising ceremonies on Iwo
Jima.
Jack L. Craven, commander of
the Washtenaw Council of Veter-
ans, will perform the introduc-
tions.
Two wreaths will be placed on
the honor roll and taps will be
sounded by Fred Bentz, chaplain
for the Ann Arbor Post of the Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars.
A color guard from the American
Legion Post of Dexter will be pres-
sent during the dedication.
The plaque is five by seven feet,
of cast bronze and contains room
for 150 additional names.
At the top of the plaque is the
inscription, "In loving memory of
those from Washtenaw County
who gave the supreme sacrifice."
An inscription at the bottom
says, "Presented by the citizens
of Washtenaw County."
Chrairman of the honor roll
committee is Esther Heusel and
members are Oscar Berkley of
Milan, Craven, Louise E. Brown,
Gertrude Murkensturm and Anna
Markey.
'Forum Group
Sets Sessions
On Freedom
Approximately 25 discussion
groups sponsored by the Ann Arbor
Freedom Forum will hold two or
three meetings during October.
Maintenance of national security
while protecting individual rights
will be the general problem to be
considered by the groups.
"Freedom of Speech, Press and
Assembly" will be the topic for
the week of Oct. 10, and "Con-
gressional Investigations" will be
considered the following week. The
evenings of the discussions will be
decided on by the individual
groups.
"The Loyalty Program" is the
topic suggested for a third, option-
al discussion. Chairman of the
Freedom Forum group in Ann Ar-
bor is the Rev. W. R. Schutze.
Editor Schedules
Campus Courses
Distinguished Pulitzer Prize win-
ner Leland Stowe will be on came

pus this fall to teach aspiring
journalists the best way of follow-
ing in his footsteps.
An author as well as a news-
paperman, Stowe has won medals
for foreign correspondence and
war correspondence from schools
and institutions throughout the
country.
For this semester, Stowe is leav-
ing his position of roving editor
of Reader's Digest to teach two
courses and hold a seminar for
graduate journalism students.
In February, he will return to
his editorship.

f'

i
4 !-

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STUDENTS
Welcome Back!
Come in and
Browse Around.
Your credit is
good here.
HERE'S OUR "BACK TO
COLLEGE" SPECIALS:
KHAKI CHINO
SLACKS
$400
OXFORD SHIRTS
s/o

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