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January 18, 1956 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-01-18

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18, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

13, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

M!==!!=

Schools, Playgrounds Won't
Solve Delinquency Problem

HOT PACKS, EXERCISES:
Polio Funds Help Therapy Students

By SUE JESSUP
"Additional schools and play-
grounds will not provide the solu-
tion to the juvenile delinquency
problem," Prof. William C. Morse,
Director of the University Fresh
Air Camp, said in a lecture held
yesterday.
Addressing the second session of
the Michigan Pastors conference
held in Rackham building, Morse
said that there is no definite solu-
tion to juvenile delinquency.
"Part of the difficulty in deal-
ing with the delinquency problem
stems from the fact that conflict
exists between lay workers and
professional people," Morse said.
There is a lack of understanding
between professional workers with
extensive training and lay people
who sometimes can handle de-
linquents successfully, he added.
No Coherent Training.
"Besides there isn't any real,
r coherent training for workers
dealing with delinquents," he ex-
plained. As a result confusion in
theory and belief develop, which
prevents people from finding a
solution to the problem.
Morse believes that the internal
life of the child is more import-
ant than the external environ-
1 tIH GH

DIAL 2-2513
ENDING T HURSDAY
Glorious
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MGM's PRODUCTION OF THE
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HOWARD s"rring ANN
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ment. As an example, he cited
the case of a child from the slums
who became a well adjusted adult
in spite of his environment. Con-
versely a child from a good neigh-
borhood became a delinquent.
Personal Side Neglected
"The personal side of the childI
which is the most important has
been the most neglected," he
stated. Sympathetic, trained work-
ers must be able to understand
how the child meets reality.
This understanding can best be
achieved when the worker actu-
ally lives in the same environment
with the troubled child, Morse
said.
Behavior Important
"It is very important to separ-
ate the child's individual behavior
from his action as a member of a
group," Morse added.
"It is highly necessary to cen-
ter attention of delinquency until
actual solutions to the problem
are found," he said.
Chances Good
For Surviving
Heart Wounds
One has a pretty good chance of
surviving a stab wound in the
heart, according to Dr. John P.
Stainer, junior clinical instructor
in the University of Michigan De-
partment of Surgery.
Studies show that victims of
heart stab wounds have a 60 to
70 percent chance of survival if
surgery is immediate and the
wound is not too large.
"People used to think that a
wounded heart, like the broken
neck, meant instant death," said
Dr. Stainer. "This is not neces-
sarily the case."
Dr. Stainer has made an in-
tensive study of stab wounds of
the heart and performed several
operations as well. He says the
operation is "relatively simple,"
and that some of his patients have
been up and around in ten to
fourteen days.
Dr. Stainer has perfected a tech-
nique which has, been successful
in a series of operations on pa-
tients who were brought to him
with stabbed hearts. So far in
his series 75 per cent of all cases
operated on lived. Between 1934
and 1951 he studied twenty of the
original group of 65 survivors.
His investigation reveals that
six of these 20 patients later
developed heart disease. However,
Dr. Stainer states that "none of
these can be attributed to the
original stab wounds."
Those who did develop later
heart trouble represented the us-
ual types of organic heart disease,
such as those due to hyper-ten-
sion, arterfosclerosis and in one
case, syphilis.

Humor Still
Frustrated
At Colorado
Plans to launch a new "sex and
humor magazine" for University
of Colorado students are running
up against difficulties.
Last month that university's
humor magazine, "Flatiron," was
banned after being described as
"worse than obscene" by a Denver
newspaper.
Recently Bob Latham, former
"Flatiron" photographer, initiated
plans to print a magazine off-
campus along the line of "Flat-
iron" but with no official connec-
tion with the university this time.
But would-be editor Latham
complains he is having trouble
finding someone to print it.
"Certainly there is somebody
in the state of Colorado who will
print this," Latham said. He went
on to suggest "indirect pressure"
is being applied similar to the
"suppression of La Prensa," the
Argentine paper banned by Peron.
His new magazine, "Dood," will
contain "material as 'raunchy' as
they (the students) wish, and the
taxpayers will be satisfied because
the university has not lent such
a project its official sanction," the
Colorado Daily, student newspa-
per, said in an editorial.
Latham invited an "exotic dan-
cer" from a Denver night club to
campus last week to pose for
"Dood" photographs. However no
riots ensued this time as they did
last year when Latham invited a
strip artist over to pose for the
"Flatiron."

DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER

HELD

By T. S. Eliot
THIS WEEK ONL

f

Wed. through Sat., 8:15 P.M.

327 S. 4th Ave. (Masonic Temple)

Admission $1.65

Students 99c

Box office open daily 10-5

Phone NO 2-5915 For Reservations Now!

WOMEN'S

OVER

SHOE BARGAINS

EXAM PREPARATION-Kay Wilson (left) and Barbara Henry exercise the leg of Larry Duhaime,
four-years-old, who has been recovering from polio since 1952. Both women are physical therapy
students.

O

Sixteen students are now pre-
paringfor exams by giving each
other hot packs and exercises.
The men and women are mem-
bers of the physical therapy
school. They are receiving train-
ing in care of polio patients and
victims of accidents, arthritis,
cerebral palsey and other diseases.
Grants from the National Foun-
dation for Infantile Paralysis
have purchased most of the
school's equipment.
Laboratory Work Ahead
For program graduation, senior
students must attend a full cal-
endar year of classroom and lab-
oratory work, the program con-
suming 39 hours per week.
Five of the students currently
enrolled are holders of scholar-
ships created by the March of
Dimes.
Qualified workers in the field
are scarce according to Mrs. John
H. Huss, chairman of the Washte-
naw County March of Dimes cam-
paign. "The lack of physical
therapists is almost unbelievable."
she said.
Therapists Needed
"There are 7,300 physical thera-
pists in the United States today,
but there is need for 12,440. To
help meet these needs through
recruitment and training a mini-

I

mum of $2,300,000 will be required
from the 1956 March of Dimes'
funds."
One half of the funds collected
in Washtenaw county goes to the
National. Foundation to be used
for this and other purposes, in-
cludingsthe epidemic aid fund and
research.
Foundation Provides Funds
Since 1938, the National Foun-
dation has provided $422,200,000
to advance professional education
by providing fellowships for stu-
dents, funds for research, aiding
nurses' groups in on-the-job train-
ing programs.
Invaded
DURHAM, N. H. (')-Invad-
ing one of man's last domains
on the campus, two University
of New Hampshire freshmen
coeds have surprised their 618
male colleagues in Air Force
science and tactics by doing
straight "A" work in the course.
The girls, Janet LaChance of
North Conway, N. H., and Mary
Hardy of Reading, Mass., said
they elected the course because
they were "sick and tired of
hearing men talking about
airplanes."

IAME MYRA HESS1

JACQUELINE DRESS SHOES $L0O
reg. to 11.95 ........ Now
CONNIE Dress, sport & flats$A
reg. to 8.95 ......... $'4 0
HUDDLE BOATS90
reg. 10.95 . .......$
HOUSE SLIPPERS
Values to 4.95 ...........

Distinguished
British Pianist
WED. 8:30
EXTRA SERIES
HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets: $3.50 - $3.00
$2.50 - $2.00 - $1.50

All winter Footwear

20% off reg. price

Winner of 2 British
Academy Awards-
"The Divided Heart"

i

andu"l

DIAL NO 2-3136
ENDING TODAY

BUDAPEST QUARTET
CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL-
Geb. 17, 18, 19 - RACKHAM
Season Tickets: $3.50 - $2.50; Single $1.25 - $1.75
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
BURTON MEMORIAL TOWER

306 South State

JOHN
WAYNE.
LAUREN
DACALL

Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

I

5-

m

7H,

BARGAIN DAYS at

BARGAIN DAYS at Collins

I

ThA ILYN ShoF
19-531 1. L Iberty tr. Michigan Theatre Bldg.
LARGE REDUCTIONS

sit .P WVARNER BROS. g
NjgEuaSc oPE
WARNERCOLOR
* Thursday *
WARNER BROS. O O=It T
GA RYcQPER
CINEMASCOPE AND WARNERCOLO9R

I

n Dresses, Coats, and Sportswear

COfiTS

Our Remaining Stock of
Winter Coats. Sizes 8 to 18.
Formerly $49.95 to $159.95
Our Remaining Stock of
Fall and Winter Suits.
Were $29.95 to $99.50

REDUCED

SUITS

PRICE

s F

WINTER BARGAIN DAYS

DRESSES

Casual, Afternoon,
Cocktail and
Formal

YI: PRICE

Starting This Morning from 9 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.

* Dresses

0 Hats

1 OFF

0 Gloves4

GREATLY

* Lingerie...'(broken lots)
*Gift Items

. Jewelry

Table of BLOUSES
Cotton - Wool Jersey - Corduroy
Embroidered Jersey-and Nylon Jersey

REDUCED
Table of LINGERIE
GOWNS, SLIPS and HALF SLIPS

WINTER
COATS 20% off
an exceptionally good selection
Suits . . . 1/ off
Robes .. 1/3 off

____j

Groups of KNIT DRESSES

11

0

-$29.00

$39.00

i

II I

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