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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 14, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEMICHIGANDAILY

PA GI

HAZARDS CHECKED:
'U' Security Fore Patrols For Fire

Administrators.See No
Reluctance to Comment

el

*SFEflSr

By KEITH De VRIES

{yj. ..

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x

Fire detection is the main con-
cern of the University security
c, force, according to Albert E. Heu-
sel, head of the force.
With many campus buildings
rated as fire hazards, the 26 men
under him are instructed to watch
continually for any sign of fire,
Heusel says.
He credits the restricting of the
potentially dangerous fire in the
Romance Language Building last
fall to the alertness of the officers
on patrol that night in spotting
the blaze while it was still small.
Heusel's men work from 9:30
p.m. to 6:30 a.m. each day check-
ing a particular group of build-
ings assigned to him.
Challenge Anyone
In their patrols men challenge
anyone they find in buildings af-
ter closing hours to produce iden-
tification.
If they do discover a prowler
the men are given authority to
hold him until city police arrive.
More commonly they find people
who have just unwittingly stayed
in the building after it closed.
The normal practice in the lat-
ter case is for Heusel to turn in
their names to the department in
charge of the building.
"Actually the work is not so
exciting as it may sound,"Heusel
says. "Like any other job it's
pretty much routine.
Lock the Doors
"For instance much of the work
consists in just locking doors and
windows left open at night."
Another frequent chore is to mop
up water when scientific equip-
ment linked up to water sources
bursts, he relates.
Heusel left the Ann Arbor police
force in 1952 to head the present
security set-up.
Supervise the Men
Besides his work of supervising
the men on the force, Heusel works
with the University parking auth-
ority and the Ann Arbor police
department on parking problems.
He gisven the authority to call
in the police to remove cars ob-
structing lots.
Junior IFC Elects
Getz President
Burt Getz, '59E, Sigma Chi
pledge class president, has been
elected president of the-Junior In-
ter-Fraternity Council.
John Gerber, '59, Beta Theta
Pi pledge, was picked as vice-presi-
dent. Emory Griffin, '59, Theta
Delta Chi pledge, was chosen sec-
retary and Sigma Alpha Mu
pledlge, Jim Richman, became
treasurer.
The officers were elected by the
JIFC pledge council after they had
petitioned and been interviewed
by a nominating committee.
At the same meeting, a plaque
was presented to Beta Theta Pi
for the most active pledge class.

ALBERT E. HEUSEL
... Chief Security Officer

THINNER CONCRETE SLABS:

11

Willow Run Airport is being
used by University engineers as a
pavement laboratory, according to
Floyd G. Wakefield, airport super-
visor. '
Speaking to an annual meeting
of the American Road Builders
Association yesterday, Wakefield
told how the University has been
studying and recording the his-
tory of each foot of pavement at
Willow Run.
Watching Every Inch
At the Miami meeting he said
that observation of the airport
has shown that new roads can be
built of longer-lasting, thinner
slabs of concrete, so long as the
road bed has the proper sub-grade
preparation and construction "dis-
cipline."
Wakefield also reported that
virtually every inch of the airport
terminal's pavement has been
watched closely since 1946, both
by foot surveys and aerial photo-
graphs.
Engineers have even gone so far
as to number every slab of con-
crete, record its history and esti-
mate its future life.

The compiled records, Wakefield
continued, show distinctly the
areas in which high standards of
construction were upheld or ne-
glected.
Building Long Stretches
Cracks, for example, have ap-
peared in some sections where top-
soil was not removed or where
drainage was poor.
University engineers feel this is
an important point to be consider-
ed during times, of pressure to
build long stretches of highway as
rapidly as possible, Wakefield told
the road builders.
Self-Survey
Group Picks
Nine Delegates
Nine delegates-at-large elected
to the Policy Committee of the
Self-Survey of Ann Arbor have
been announced.
They are James Brinkerhoff,
William Butzin, Mrs. Dorwin Cart-
wright, Peter Eckstein, '58, Tom
Harrison, Mrs. Sibley Hoobler,
Gustav, Leinbach, Donald Pelz,
study director for the Survey Re-
search Center, and Mrs. Elizabeth
Slack.
The nine, elected at a general
meeting earlier in the week, will
meet with organizational delegates
for a policy meeting at 8*p.m.
Wednesday in the Bethlehem Ev-
angelical and Reformed Church,
423 S. 4th.
Approximately 30 organizations
have joined in sponsorship of the
self-survey project.

(Continued from Page 1)
undoubtedly taken their toll in the
University faculty," David Levy,
'57, chairman of the Literary Col-
lege Steering Committee claimed.
He went on to say, "Instructors,
aware of their status, promotion
and reputation can hardly be ex-
pected to endanger themselves in
our fear-ridden climate of politi-
cal opinion."
Maintaining that "the Univer-
sity faculty is fulfilling its basic
responsibility'to its students," In-
Lesle Scores
'Stagnation'
(Continued from Page 1)
In fact, Prof. Carr maintained,
"there hardly is a comnunity in
the University."
Common language and common
interests are the backbone of any
community, he said. "The inter-
est is there, but the language is
not."
He criticized barriers caused by
"differences in vocabulary and
terminology. We've lost the power
of translating."
Prof. Theodore Newcomb of the
psychology and sociology depart-
ments describedI faculty reluctance
to publicly discuss some issues as
often due to a feeling "that we
have no special competence to ex-
press an opinion.
Reserved Respect
"I'm not sure that to do so is a
good way of taking the role of
'leader of intellectual thought in
the University.' Many of us think,"
Prof. Newcomb continued, "we can
better take that role by demon-
strating a reserved respect for the
evidence than by rushing into print
with our opinions."
However, in "intra - University
affairs we don't have to be ex-
perts to be entitled to an opinion,
because about our own fate even
our opinions matter," he remarked.
"About expressing such opinions
I think some of us have been
frightened, and more of us have
been indifferent."
4 .1
Organization
Notices
Congregational-Disciples Guild: Stu-
dent panel, "It's A Small World," Me-
morial Christian Church (Disciples),
Hill and Tappan Streets, Jan. 15, 6:45
p.m.
- ,
Episcopal Student Foundation: Buffet
supper followed by lecture-discussion
on "Incarnation" led by the Rev. R. C.
Adams, Jan. 15, 5:30 p.m., Canterbury
House.
s f s
Hawaii Club: Meeting and social
hour, tonight, 8:30 p.m., Lane Hall.
* * *
HillelFoundation: Saturday morning
Sabbath services, 9:00 a.m., Hilel.
Sunday night Supper Club followed
by record dance, 6:00 p.m., Hillel.
Michigan Christian Fellowship: Rev.
Roy McBeth, Detroit, Mich., will speak
on "The Conversion of Saul," Jan. 15,
4:00 p.m., Lane Hall.
* * *
SRA: Folk dancing, Jan. 16, 7:30 to
10:00 p.m., in the Lane Hllrecreation
room. Instruction for eveiy dance, and
beginners are welcome.

terfraternity Council President Bob
Weinbaum, '56, expressed the be-
lief that "our teachers cannot be
forced into anything like stifling1
students' free thought."
Kelly Probes
Changes Due
To Marriage
By MARILYN WOOD
How do individuals change dur-
ing the course of marriage?
This question has recently been
answered by a study involving 278
marriages.
Prof. E. Lowell Kelly of the
psychology department has been
gathering information for 20 years
concerning five questions about
marriages.
The study is still in progress,
but Prof. Kelly has completed the
phase concerning how individuals
change in marriage.
He concluded that there is con-
tinued psychological growth dur-
ing adult years. This subtle
growth is reflected in significant
changes in the individual's person-
ality.
After 20 years more emphasis
was placed on religious values by
both men and women, Prof. Kelly
found. This was the largest spe-
cific change which became ap-
parent in the study.
Men. and women differed little
in any of the tests, the professor
says. An example of this is shown
in the change in attitude of both
men and women toward house-
keeping.
At the first testing neither sex
expressed a particular dislike of
housekeeping. Twenty years later
both had shifted their views mark-
edly toward dislike.
Results of the study indicated
that women tend to gain self-con-
fidence during the years.
Another d4iscovery shows that
both men and women seem to be
slightly more masculine in their
likes and dislikes than formerly.
Mechanization of the -home
through modern appliances is the.
explanation offered by Prof. Kelly
for this trend. An interest in
things mechanical is commonly,
recognized as a masculine one, he
says. He adds that men as well
as women favor this mechaniza-
tion.
Other changes noted by parti-
cipants of self-rating scales are
tendencies to be less neat, less en-
ergetic, less broad in interests and
less good tempered.
Most consistent among both men
and women over the 20 years was
intelligence. Values held by the
individuals and vocational inter-
ests also remained unchanged in
the majority of cases.
Attitudes and personality self-
ratings were most changeable, the
study shows.
There was no evidence that "op-
posites attract" or that husbands
and wives grow to be more similar
as years pass, Prof. Kelly noted.
In fact, if anything, the husbands
and wives were more alike at the
beginning of the 20 years than at
the end, he added.

ployee under the supervision of the
nurses attends to the personal needs
of the patients. He encourages pa-
tients' participation in activities
within the therapy program according
to the design of the medical staff.
Apply Personnel 'office, University
Hospital Mon. thru Fri. 8-11 A.M.,
1-3 P.M. )64H
ADVERTISING Copywriter wanted. Full
or part time. Experience preferred,
not necessary. Work must be done
in our office during regular hours.
Phone Mr. Horst, NO 2-5517. )63H
WANTED - Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Excellent salary. Morning de-
livery, no collecting. Call NO 2-3241.
)29H
WANTED-cab drivers. Full or part
time. Apply 113 S. Ashley, Ann Arbor.
Yellow and Checker Cab Company,
phone NO 8-9382. )6H
FOR SALE
C.C.M. men's hockey skates. Brand1
new. Size 11. $10.00. NO 3-1470. )113B
ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANICA, complete
set. Excellent condition. Phone NO 2-
8800. )112B
PARLOR GRAND (Conover) piano -
fine tone and condition-suitable for
hall, fraternity or sorority. Bargain
at $600.00. Phone Detroit: UN 1-4206.
)110B
SIAMESE KITTENS for sale. Papers
available. Siamese cat stud service.
NO 2-9020. )104B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88; Sox,
39c; Shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )4B
STUDENT ROOM
RUG SPECIAL
9x12 cottons, all colors, priced
on sale now at $29.95
SMITH'S CARPET STORE
207 E. Washington NO 3-5536
COOKED and cleaned select cocktail
shrimp for the party, get-togethers at
Washington Fish Market, 208 E.
Washington, NO 2-2589. Free delivery.
)3B
REAL ESTATE
NEARLY NEW 4 bedroom ranch, $1,500
down, $75 monthly; near shopping
and bus. Price $8,950. Roswell Dillon,
Realtor. NO 3-4154. Eves. NO 5-4432 or
NO 8-9030. )4R
ROOMS FOR RENT
5-ROOM apartment - private bath-
$150 a month. Call NO 3-1670 after
5:30. )11D
VERY NICE single rooma fo male stu-
dent. 1519 Granger. NO 2-5101. )I10D

HELP WANTED
NELSON International House is now ac-
cepting applications for house par-
ents or house mother. Preferably
Univ. affiliated. 26 or over. Steward
and social responsibilities. Phone Pe-
ter Barnard, NO 3-8506, 915 Oakland.
)66H
PART TIME for baby care, hours may
be arranged. NO 3-1511, Ext. 2334 or
NO 3-5010. )65H

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Pair of pink-rimmed glasses in
brown case. If found please call 404
Mosher. )108A
LOST-Description: sun glasses in red
case. Call NO 3-0791 after 5:30. )107A
LOST: Siamese bracelet in Mason Hall.
Sentimental v a lue . Reward! B.
Houghton-5017 Stockwell. )106A

MALE PSYCHIATRIC AIDES
This is an entrance level job in
of patients at the hospital. The

care MALE ROOMMATE wanted to share
em- large apartment. Reasonable. )C34

QUIET DOUBLE near campus. 819 E.
University. Call John or Ron, NO 2-
1147. )33C
USED CARS
1946 CADILLAC convertible-1948 Dodge
coupe. Best offer over $175 takes ei-
ther car. Bob's Service, 4990 Whitmore
Lake Rd. )108N
1946 PACKARD Clipper. Unusually
clean and good condition. 31,000
miles. Best offer. Call NO 2-3941 Sun-
day 10-5. Also a 2-wheel utility 'trail-
er, Evenings, 6-7. )107N
1955 MERCURY-6,000 actual miles. Au-
tomatic shift. $2,295. (Sold new -
$3,300). Jim White, Inc. 222 W. Wash-
ington. NO 2-5000. )106N
BUY WITH CONFIDENCE
WE ARE the only dealer in Washtenaw
County that can offer you a LIFE-
TIME WARRANTY on a used car.
Many sharp cars to choose from. See
t us now. Fitzgerald, Inc. 3345 Wash-
tenaw. NO 3-4197. )105N
1951 DODGE, 4-door, radio and heater.
Automatic transmission. A good run-
ning car. $395.00. Jim White, Inc. 222'
W. Washington. NO 2-5000. )102N
1950 MERCURY, 2-door, overdrive. A
good running car, $195. Jim White,
Inc., 222 W. Washington, NO 2-5000.
)103N
1949 FORD 4-door, black, radio & heat-
er, good rubber. Runs gpod. $215.
Jim White, Inc., 222 W. Washington,
NO 2-5000. )104N
1950 BUICK SPECIAL-2 door, one
owner car. University Oldsmobile, 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507. )95N
'50 PLYMOUTH Stationwagon, heater,
turn signals. Very nice shape. $445.
University Oldsmobile, 907 N. Main,
NO 3-0507. )85N
'50 PLYMOUTH-2 door sedan, real nice
car. $345. University Oldsmobile, 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507. )86N
1950 FORD V-8 2-door in excellent
shape. $395. University Oldsmobile. 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507 or 2-9626. )72N
PERSONAL
BARBA-The Van Becelacres' are my
cousins too. You must be my sister,
but your last name is Rycus -Stupid!
Mary Lou Rycus. )81F
SAY HAPPY BIRTHDAY the different
way. Send friendly greetings to
friends by advertising in the MICHI-
GAN DAILY CLASSIFIED Section,

WANTED TO RENT
WANTED-Living quarters for a local
elderly women who is in good health.
It must consist of a pleasant room
and good board 7 days a week. Please
give address and details as to what
you have to offer and the price.
Write Box 13D Michigan Daily. )13L
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING - Theses, Term papers, etc.
Reasonable Rates, Prompt Service,
830 South Main, NO 8-7590. )15J
RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Lct us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade.
)4J
RICHARD MADDY-VIOLINMAKER
Fine, old certified instruments and
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )2J
SERVICE SHOP, 1217 S.A. Studio. 1317
S. Univ. )1J
H I-Fl
Components and Service Audio-
phmile, net prices. Telefunken Hi-
Ft, AM-FM shortwave radios. Serv..
ice on all makes of radios and phono-
graphs. Ann Arbor Radio and TV,
1217 S. University. Phone NO 8-7942.
1 % a blocks east of East Eng. )iJ
WASHINGS -Also ironings privately.
Specializing in cotton dresses. Free
pick up and delivery. Phone NO 2-
9020. )9J
CARS FOR RENT
AVIS RENT A CAR or truck for local
or long distance use. Reasonable
daily, weekly or hourly rates. Nye
Motor Sales, Inc., 210 W. Washington
St. NO 3-4156. )S85
TRANSPORTATION
TWO PASSGERS to share driving to
Seattle. Leaving Jan. 31st. Phone NO
2-1986. )33G
WOULD YOU LIKE to drive my car to
Montreal during February or March?
I will pay gas and oil. Phone NO 3-
6709. )32G
Drive a new car to
Florida-California
Seattle, Denver, Shreveport, La.
Gas paid. No waiting.
2465 Grand river
Detroit, Mich. (Jowntown)'
Call Woodward 1-3990
)21G

lhk

11

SUNDAY at 8 only

U I

III

FRANCIS RAYMOND

IS IT WORTH
THIS? .. . FROM
THE ARMS OF A

IT'S HITCHCOCK!!Y
IT'S MONTE CARLO !
FC-ARY GRANT
GRACE KELLV

I

I

11

50c

i

E

MAN SHE LOVED . .
INTO A LIFE OF
AND RUINI

SHAME

Personally Narrates His
Great Color Documentary Film

' BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET
FEB. 16, 17, 18 -- RACKHAM AUD.

/

ATHIE
Color by
TECHNICOLOR

Dial
NO 2-3136

.01wo t#

I1w 0

I - OW PM M -1

TICKETS (3 Concerts) $2.50-$3.50-Single Concerts $1.25-$1.75

I

John Wayne battling his way out of
terror against the toughest odds
a fighting man ever took!

I

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
Burton Tower

I

THfE STORY
OF AN
INFIDELITY

Featuring Navajo Indian Life
Fabulous Uranium Mining
West's Spectacular Scenic
Splendour
SUNDAY
January 15, 3:00 P.M.
PATTENGILL AUDITORIUM
105 South State Street
General Admission $1.00

Mats.
5 Oc
Eves.
80c

Also
Walt Disney's
"Aquerolo de Brasil"
"Festival Days"
Featurette

I

I i

....::":r:.:::i~rt";"::;":ri":"t":r........":" i: c<:=i..
EXTRA
ROSE BOWL SHOTS

Coming Sunday
From the famous stage
"KISMET"
In Opulent Color

show

I

I

Department of Speech Presents

I

I

0

Act III Wharton's

*1

.1'

* * * * *

" i
Yr ' ,"

0 ,
Z

the
7'
/e ~teta

TH~e PL.AC3E:
Chiku Shan, Chinal
THI SiME:
Almost too late

0

* * * * *

U)

I

Act III Lorca's ||

III L .

1

I-- N * f

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