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September 25, 1955 - Image 11

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-09-25

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACE. H

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAG! ILEV~R~N7

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DISCRIMINATION STUDY:
Human Relations Group
To Conduct Self-Survey

Leaders in an exploratory com-
mittee will meet Tuesday to re-
activate their efforts toward a
survey of human relations in the
Ann Arbor community.
During the summer the still-
informal group set its sights on a
comprehensive survey of many
problems in human relations, such
as attitudes in housing and em-
ployment of minority groups.
Education, public facilities, health
and recreation are areas that may
also be considered.
The group plans to conduct a
self-survey. A self-survey differs
most in its goal of mass volunteer
participation in collecting, analyz-
ing and discussing data, with pro-
fessionals used only for advice.
In Ann Arbor, the origins of
the self-survey have come from
the citizens as well as from the
University community. In many
communities where a self survey
has been tried, it has focused pub-
lic attention and interest on hu-
man relations problems. Concrete
steps for solution have often been
achieved.
The present group is limiting it-
self to setting up a larger group
which will conduct the survey.
Members were impressed early in
their discussions on human rela-
tions that despite a number of in-
vestigations there was little defi-
nite or comprehensive information
on the status of minority groups
in Ann Arbor.
Ask Community Support
Sponsorship of the self-survey
by as many community organiza-
tions as possible is a goal of the
exploratory committee. Already the
Ann Arbor Council of Churches,
the United Church Women and
League Listening
Rooms To Open
The library and listening rooms
in the League will open Monday,
October 10.
Listening rooms will not be
available to men unless accompan-
ied by a coed.

the North Side Civic Association
have decided to officially support
the project.
Members of at least 40 organiza-
tions, many as official observers,
have attended preliminary meet-
ings, chaired by Donald Pelzel of
the Survey Research Center and
Prof. J. Willcox Brown, formerly
of the Survey Research Center and
Prof. J. Willcox Brown, formerly
of the natural resources school.
At the meetings it was generally
felt that a survey would be especi-
ally timely due to the possibility
of the city council establishing a
human relations commission next
spring, when the new city charter
takes effect. The charter specifi-
cally empowers the council to es-
tablish such a commission.
Demonstrating citizen interest
in human relations problems, pro-
viding the council or the commis-
sion with comprehensive factual
information and supporting the
commission's activities were three
roles suggested for the survey
group.
Need 150 Volunteers
At an exploratory committee
meeting this summer it was esti-
mated that a self-survey would
require 150 volunteer workers, one
or more technical consultants, sev-
eral hundred dollars expenses and
one or two years' work, all subject
to variation with the scope of the
survey.
Interest was expressed at the
meeting in such problem areas as
"Are landlords willing to rent to
rate withsabilities, training and
all groups?", "Is pay commensu-
educational background for all
groups?" and "Do foreign students
face prejudice whichmmakes it
hard for them to assimilate?"
A temporary structure for the
exploratory committee was agreed
on during the summer. Five sub-
committees which will soon elect
their chairmen are contact, pro-
gram planning, public relations,
arrangements and finance. A
temporary steering committee will
consist of the five chairmen and
six members elected at the meet-
ing.

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SELF SERVICE or DROP OFF PICK UP

ADMINISTRATION--University President Harlan H. Hatcher
(left) discusses a problem with two top University administration
officers, Vice-President and Dean of Faculties Marvin L. Niehuss
and Vice-President Wilbur K. Pierpont (right).
College Age Drivers Cause
Big Percentage of Accidents

ICHAMPION in color, will twinkle
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"The safety movement des-
perately needs new blood, and new
converts, and new salesmen," is an
announcement made by Ned H.
Dearborn, president of the
National Safety Council, in an
issue of Acacia Fraternitie's pub-
lication, "The Triad."
In his article, Dearborn points
Extension Course
In Writing Given
The University Extension Serv-
ice is repeating its popular "Work-
shop in Creative Writing" this fall.
Open to both beginners and in-
termediate students, the course will
hold its first meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday in Rm. 171 of the busi-
ness administration school.
The course is designed for those
who would like practice and in-
struction in writing the short
story, the personal essay and
poetry.

out that among the three age
groupings of licensed drivers it is
neither the "teenagers or the old
grad" who are taking the highest
toll on the highway, but "the
college age group-from 18 to 24
wfich has the biggest proportion
of accidents."
A college administrator for
many years, the Council president
suggests that if college men and
women were to present a united
front behind the safety movement
it would improve their public re-
lations standing which Dearborn
believes can stand a boost at the
present time.
Dearborn also said the safety
program needs the aid of persons
who posses "the knack of convert-
ing the common sense and cold
logic of safety into a saleable
He expressed the opinion that
their country a valuable service
by campaigning to reduce the
scourge of traffic accidents which

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I

CLIFTON FADIMAN

DR. RUDOLF BING

HENRY HULL

ALBERT DEKKER

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION

1955-
1956

LECTURE

COURSE

HIL.
AUDITORIUM

I.

SEVEN OUTSTANDING NUMBERS

pmmwm

Oct. 12 GENERAL CARLOS P. ROMULO
Delegate to the United Nations from the Philippines and former
President of the U.N. General Assembly. A noted statesman, General
Romulo is known the world over for his long and honorable service
to humanity. He is an orator without peer in the unremitting
crusade for world understanding, for which he has received many
international awards and honors.
"AMERICA'S STAKE IN ASIA"
Oct. 18 DR. RUDOLF BING
Dynamic manager of the Metropolitan Opera Association who has
infused new life into the old Met. Formerly artistic director of the
famed Edinburgh International Festival of Music and Drama, his
creative ingenuity and his astute theatrical sense promise to bring
the Metropolitan to a new high in quality performance and in world
prestige.
"WHAT MAKES OPERA TICK?"

Jan. 10 CLIFTON FADiMAN
Eminent critic, essayist, television personality and author of "Party
of One," which is currently on the best-seller lists. Formerly modera-
tor of radio's perennial "Information Please," Mr. Fadiman will
present a program of favorite readings, or "read-aloud-ables" as he
calls them. There selections are spiced with comments characteris-
tically candid and witty.
"READING I'VE LIKED"
Feb. 20 DR. NORMAN VINCENT' PEALE
Outstanding inspirational leader whose book, "The Power of Positive
Thinking," has been the most widely read non-fiction work in
America the past two years. His philosophy is brought regularly to
the public through his syndicated newspaper column, radio, and his
magazine articles.
"POSITIVE THINKING"

PE NDLETON
Pairables"
here
here... fresh new Pendleton arrivals
to spice your wardrobe with color
all fall long! See the famous 49'er jacket
in new plaids, tartans and superb solid shades
...see Pendleton's rich virgin wool sweaters, too,
full-fashioned for soft, flattering fit and dyed
in Pendleton colors to blend beautifully
with 49'ers and slim Pendleton skirts
such as this Panel Pleat.
Come choose now from all our prizu
"Pairable" separates!

Nov. 15 U. S. SENATOR ALEXANDER WILEY - U. S. SENATOR WAYNE MORSE
Leading members of the Senate Foreign Affairs Committee, their conflicting views on the patterns of this country's foreign policy will provide
an informative and timely debate. This program is being especially arranged by the Oratorical Association and will be presented only in .
Ann Arbor
DEBATE: OUR FOREIGN POLICY - "RIGHT OR WRONG?"

Nov. 21

HENRY HULL

Popular actor of stage and screen whose theatrical career of over
four decades has encompassed a long list of outstanding plays from
"Tobacco Road" to "Mister Roberts." He will appear in a detailed
impersonation of Mark Twain, reading from and commenting freely'
on the humorist's best known works, including "Tom Sawyer" and
"A Connecticut Yankee."

March 6 EDITH ATWATER
ALBERT DEKKER
Two of the theatre's most engaging artists, Miss Atwater and Mr.
Dekker have toured successfully with their repertoire of scenes and
sketches, both comic and dramatic, from the world's great literature.
Included on the bill will be selections from Shakespeare, Thurber,
Frost, Poe and Sandburg.
"TWO'S A COMPANY"

STUDENTS - ALL THIS FOR ONLY $3.00!
STUDENT SECTION, SECOND BALCONY, UNRESERVED

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Box Office Now Open

First Balcony-$6.50

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Phone NO. 3-1511, Ext. 479

Sat. P.M. and Sun.)
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Short-sleeved slipon; 34-42, $9.95
Menswear flannel skirt; 10-18, $14.95

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