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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 25, 1955 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, SE R 25. 1953

TEE 1~flCIIIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 25. Th55

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FARMER'S MARKET
Located on Detroit St. between Catherine and
Kingsley-I block North of the new court house.
FRESH VEGETABLES, EGGS, and POULTRY form
fresh. Every Wednesday and Saturday from 7 A.M.
to 3 P.M.

TWO-YEAR TRIAL:
SGC Begins First Year

Gilbert'& Sullivan

I

SGC Committee Studies
University Driving Rules

SURVEYSQUESTIONNAIRE:

This year will
milestone of the
ment Council.

be an important
Student Govern-

As an experimental group or-
ganized only last semester, SGC is
oprating on a trial program for a
two-year period. The purpose of
the governing council is to review
campus problems and to act as a

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laison between the students and
the University administration and
faculty.
Working in their newly redeco-
rated quonset headquarters, SGC
members started the fall season by.
holding various open houses de- I
signed to acquaint freshmen and
transfer students with SGC struc-
ture and functions.
A few fall projects on which
SGC members will work are a
Housing Study Committe and a
Driving Regulation Committee.
They will also consider erecting
an aluminum frame, glass enclosed
bulletin board which would be set
up on the diagonal. As a gift to
the University from SGC, the
board would display general cam-
pus information.
Invitations to a series of din-
ners will be extended to members
of the Board in Review, Executive
Committee of the Senate Advisory
Committee, the University Admin-
istrative officers and the Regents.
The objective of the dinners is to
discuss SGC activities for the year.
The first fall meeting of the
Student Government Council will
be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday in
the Union. Anyone may attend.
The United States Military
Academy at West Point, New
York was founded in 1802 and
has had more than 20,000 grad-
uates.

A PIRATE KING and two maids show Gilbert andSullivan's
"Pirates of Penzance" in action. Students with musical, dra-
matic and artistic talent, or a cooperative spirit may combine
their skills and interests in the Gilbert and Sullivan Society.
Singing, and acting roles are available in addition to work in
the chorus and orchestra. Opportunities are also available along
production lines. The G & S Society plans to present "The
Gondoliers" this fall. The first organizational meeting will be
held 8 p.m. Tuesday in the League.

I

THE MOST
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CHANEL
24-W

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and
Mf4TCHING DRf4PES
only $7.98
312 SOUTH STATE'

One of the most discussed sub-
jects on campus has been the
University's driving ban.
When the controversy rose again
last spring, on the recommenda-
tion of Student Government Coun-
cil and at the request of University
President Harlan H. Hatcher, a
committee was appointed to study
the rules prohibiting student oper-
ated automobiles on campus.
The study committee will meet
Wednesday for the first time this
fall to discuss the results of sur-
veys taken at other universities
throughout the country during the
summer and to evaluate the ques-
tionnaire completed by students
registering for the fall semester.
Studying Provisions
Appointed by Vice-President for
Student Affairs James A. Lewis,
the committee is charged with
reviewing the driving ban and its
enforcement, along with possibili-
ties of revision and their omplica-
tions.
The study group consists of
three students, two members of
the faculty and two from the
administration and three from Ann
Arbor residents.
It is the first time in the history
of the University - that students
and townspeople have met to try
and solve mutual problems.
Streiff Hopeful
Assistant Dean of Men Karl D.
Streiff, chairman of the body, says
that while it is still too early in
the committee's existence for any
definite action to have been taken,
he is particulary hopeful that a
satisfactory solution can be worked
out for the problem that has plag-
ued the University for a long time.
Members of the committee in-
clude SGC representative William
Diamond, '56E, William Hanks, '56
BAd, former Daily managing editor
Gene Hartwig, '58L, Prof. Roger
W. Heyns of the psychology de-
partment, Prof. John C. Kohl of
the engineering college, Vice-
President for Student Affairs
James A. Lewis, Ann Arbor Chief
of Police Casper M. Enkemann,
City Council member Norman J.
Randall and Rudolph E. Reichert,
President of the Ann Arbor Bank.
Although it is now under study,
the driving ban goes into effect
for the coming school year tomor-
row and violations will once again
result in disciplinary action by the
University.
OSA Grants Exceptions
While the ban applies generally
to all students, exceptions Ore
granted by the Office of Student
Affairs.
Exempt are students 26 years old
or older, and those with a teaching
fellow or higher, rating. Married

students, Ann Arbor residents and
commuters, handicapped students
and students who need cars for
business purposes, may qualify for
special permits.
Restrictions are placed on all
these categories as explained at
the time of application for special
permits.
Permits are issued by the Office
of Student Affairs within the first'
two weeks of school and are In
effect for the whole school year.
Required in applications for
permits are state license plate and
driver's license numbers, state-
ments of proper insurance cover-
age and signed permission of par-
ents if the student is under the
legal age of 21.
Parking Lot
Fees Initiate
New Program
Installation of meters in nine
of the University's parking lots
and requirment for permits for'
parking in all but two of the rest
make up the first step in the
University's long-range program
for relieving the campus parking
and traffic situation.
The new plan, as recommended
by the University Faculty Senate
and approved by the Regents at its,
June meeting, is being adminis-
tered by 'Francis C. Shiel, mana-
ger of Service Enterprises.
Supervision of the lots will be
directed by Gordon L. Hansen.,
Explaining -the purpose of the
new set-up, Shiel termed it "a
See NEW, Page 14
self-liquidating program pointed
toward ultimately producing more
parking space."
Revenue obtained in the first
step of the plan will be earmarked
for construction of campus park-
ing structures.
Tentative date for starting the
first such structure is 1956. Actual
start of the structure will depend
primarily on flow of'revenue from
the new meters and permits.
Film Showings
The Detroit Institute of Arts is
planning a regular monthly series
of short films for the coming year,
consisting of films about art sub.
jects, as well as experimentalor
art'films.
Showings have been scheduled
for 8 p.m. Fridays in the Lecture
Hall.

THE QUARRY
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320 SOUTH STATE STREET

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