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January 11, 1956 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-01-11

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY", JANUARY 11, 1959

TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, JANUARY U, 19S6

E'AyORABLE SHIFT FOR DEMOCRATS:
Southern Political Winds Blowing

By BEM PRICE
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
WASHINGTON (MP)-For Demo-
crats the political winds from the
traditionally "Solid South" have
undergone a favorable shift in the
past three years.
The great whirlwinds which
blew Texas, Florida, Virginia and
Tennessee into the Republican
camp in the 1952 presidential
campaign are conspicuously calm
today.
In brief, the South seems to
have returned to normal although,
a couple of potential high pressure
areas remain in Texas and South
Carolina.
Despite lip service to the idea,
the Republicans have made no
real effort to follow up the ad-
vantages acquired in 1952 by set-
ting up grass-root organizations.
However, in Atlanta, where
golfer Bobby Jones' and others
sparked an Eisenhower-for-presi-
dent movement, the Republicans
mustered 620 persons in December
for a $25 a plate fund-raising din-
ner.
At that dinner, Republican
Chairman Leonard Hall predicted
the South, "is turning toward the
Republicans in such force that in
1956 we will pick up another 10 or
15 congressional seats." No South-
ern leader of stature commented
on Hall's statement.
If thbe Southern Governors Con-
ference at Point Clear, Ala., is any
indication, the seeds of anti-Demo-
cratic revolt which sprouted in
1948 and 1952 over states' rights,
the segregation issue, "Reds" and
"corruption in government" have
failed to flower.
The precise reason is a matter
of speculation, but it is fairly cer-
tain that the Dixon-Yates power
plant proposals which were inter-
preted by some as an effort to'
scuttle the Tennessee Valley Auth-
ority, antagonized a segment of
voters.j
Tiere was resentment, too, of
the Justice Department's interven-
tion in the school segregation
cases. The department asked the
Supreme Court to declare segre-
gation in schools, on the basis of
race, unconstitutional and the
courtlater did just that.
The fact that scant considera-
tion was given in Republican party
councils to the Southern view-
point disillusioned others.
In any case, little sentiment
was expressed at the governors
conference for a third party move-
ment such as the one which led
to the formatiofi of the States'
Rights Democratic party in 1948.
The only governor, in fact, to
-wCG
I es

Republicans
64 Democrats

pliii+n
.A
r - ALA.

Republicans
146 Democrats
nKLAs. R
TEXAS AK TENN
Hoo ereyvs. Roosevelt

Hoover vs. Smith
States Rights
1Q9 Democrats
* :.~:~:* SLA
KY. .
TEXAS 'KA ARK. TENN
* One States lights
vote from Tennssee

81 -

Republicans
Democrats

2'

MISS.
LA
0 ALA.

Dewey vs. Truman

place much crede;ice in the third
party idea was George Bell Tim-
merman of South Carolina, who
said it was a "strong possibility."
Even the suggestion that the
South form a coalition to back a
candidate of their choice at the
1956 presidential nominating con-
vention was greeted coldly.
Outside of the Timmerman
statement, the only other indica-
tion of major dissatisfaction among
the governors came from Allen
Shivers of Texas, who led that
state into the Republican camp
in 1952.
Shivers, who still considers him-
self a Democrat, mostly expressed
opposition to the nomination of
Adlai Stevenson, but whethe'r that
Engine Honorary
Chooses Thirteen
Chi Epsilon, national civil En-
gineering honorary fraternity, last
night tapped the following initi-
ates:
Llody E. Bastian, '56E, John E.
Baxter, '57E, Khalil Beitinj aneh,
'57E, Richard J. Brender, '57E, Ger-
ben Bruinsma, '56, Donald D.
Good, '57E, Omar K. Helferich,
157E, Joseph Litvin, '57E, Walid
H. Dimawi, '56E, Raymond K.
Rowley, '57E, Thomas S. Spiers,
'57E, Robert D. Tazelaar, '57, H.
Carl Walker Jr., '57, and E. Peter
Washabaugh, '57E.

AP Newsfeatures
tends another Texas revo
evenson is nominated is a m
conjecture.
One significant factor in
Ltical scene is the emerg
a strong effort to present
mocratic party in 1956 as a
of moderation.
This idea of moderation has'
ongly supported by Sen.
in Johnson (D-Tex), Senate
rity leader, and repeated byI
.son. Most Southern leaders
em to approve.

Eisenhower vs. Stevenson f
lt if So far the indications are that
atter the South has returned to normal,
but there are still some rumblings
the of discontent against "Northern
,ence control of the party," labor's close
the-
par relationship and "left wing" in-
fluences.
been By and large, though, the course
Lyn- of politics in the South is back to
ma- normal for the time being. To
Stev- date, no strong man has risen
also with a strong issue which will
shake the South in 1956.

Asia Effect
On America
Discussed
"We must look, not only at
Indian civilization, but at the
civilization of man in a new light."
Prof. Robert Heine-Geldern yes-
terday concluded a series of two
lectures on Prehistoric Contacts
Between Asia and America by
pointing out that there is definite
evidence of Asian influence on the
Americas long before the time of
Columbus.
Yesterday's lecture, "Hindu-
Buddhist Influence in the Art of
Meso-America," showed the in-
fluences of Indian and Cambodian
people on Mexican and Mayan
civilizations in America.
Prof. Heine-Geldern's second
lecture followed up his first one on
Chinese influences by showing that
other Asian countries took over
where the Chinese left off.
As in the first lecture, Prof.
Heine-Geldern showed slides of,
various works of art of Asian and
of American extraction.
By comparing similarities be-
tween the two in specific cases, he
showed that coincidences were so
striking that there must have
been some way in which one must
have affected the other.
Prof. Heine-Geldern, presently
with the University of Chicago, on
leave from the-University of Vien-
na, compared the Indian game of
Parchesi with an identical Mexi-
can game.
They are so much alike, he said,
that the two sets of rules could
not have been developed separate-
ly.
One of the most frequently com-
pared art motifs was that of the
lotus flower. Great similarities
existed between this decorative
work from India and Cambodia
when compared with similar'\ art
forms from Mayan civilizations
and Mexico.
However, the guest lecturer
showed, art is not the only form
of comparison. Architecture plays
a major role in comparing the
civilizations.
He also pointed out that sup-
posed influence on Mayan pyra-
mids by Cambodian pyramids was
not possible because of times in-
volved.
In addition to art and architec-
ture, the professor said, many
ideas of the state, of political sys-
tems, are also very similar between
the two continents and help to
prove an influence.
These Asians also probably took
the same trade routes to America,
across the north Pacific. He con-
cluded that their influence, like
that of the Chinese, probably end-
ed because of an existing political
situation, some time in the 12th
century.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Siamese bracelet in Mason Hall.
Sentimental v alu e. Reward! B.
Houghton-5017 Stockwell. )106A
PERSONAL
TUTORING: Biology and related sub-
jects. Call NO 5-2762. Howard Harris.
)77.F
SAY HAPPY BIRTHDAY the different
way. Send friendly greetings to
friends by advertising in the MICHI-
GAN DAILY CLASSIFIED Section.
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED-Living quarters for a local
elderly woman who is in good health.
It must consist of a pleasant room
and good board 7 days a week. Please
give address and details as to what
you have to offer and the price.
Write Box 13D Michigan Daily. )13L
HELP WANTED
ADVERTISING Copywriter wanted. Full
or part time. Experience preferred,
not necessary. Work must be done
in our office during regular hours,
Phone Mr. Horst, NO 2-5517. )63H
SECRETARY for engineering office.
Full time. Call NO 3-5723 shortlyaf-
ter 8 a.m. or before 5 p.m. ) 62H
SILENT TYPIST part time 6-10 hours.
Pay well. Schedule and salary flexible.
Reply to Box 12D. )61H
WANTED - Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Excellent salary. Morning de-
livery, no collecting. Call NO 2-3241.
) 29H
WANTED-cab drivers. Full or part
time. Apply 113 S. Ashley, Ann Arbor.
Yellow and Checker Cab Company,
phone NO 8-9382. )6H
FOR SALE
SIAMESE KITTENS for sale. Papers
available. Siamese cat stud service.
NO 2-9020. )104B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88; Sox,;
39c; Shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )4B
STUDENT ROOM
RUG SPECIAL
9x12 cottons, all colors, priced
r on sale now at $29.95
SMITH'S CARPET STORE
207 E. Washington NO 3-5536
COOKED and cleaned select cocktail
shrimp for the party, get-togethers at
Washington Fish Market, 208 E.
Washington, NO 2-2589. Free delivery.
)3B

.9

USED CARS
BUY WITH CONFIDENCE
WE ARE the only dealer in Washtenaw
County that can offer you a LIFE-
TIME WARRANTY on a- used car.
Many sharp cars to choose from. See
us now. Fitzgerald, Inc. 3345 Wash-
tenaw. NO 3-4197. )105N
1949 HUDSON, 2-door, radio and heater.
One owner car. $195. Jim White, Inc.
222 W. Washington, NO 2-5000. )1OIN
1951 DODGE, 4-door, radio and heater.
Automatic transmission. A good run-
ning car. $395.00. Jim White, Inc. 222
W. Washington. NO 2-5000. )102N
1950 MERCURY, 2-door, overdrive. A
good running car, $195. Jims White,
Inc., 222 W. Washington, NO 2-5000.
)103N
1949 FORD 4-door, black, radio & heat-
er, good rubber. Runs good. $215.
Jim White, Inc., 222 W. Washington,
NO 2-5000. )104N
JAGUAR
Sports Sedan-Seats 5.
Leather seats, walnut dash, etc.
Good condition. Selling at a loss.
$1395--terms. Phone NO 3-2090
after 6 any day. )100N
1950 BUICK SPECIAL-2 door, one
owner car. University Oldsmobile, 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507. )95N
'50 PLYMOUTH Stationwagon, heater,
turn signals. Very nice shape. $445.
University Oldsmobile, 907 N. Main,
NO 3-0507. )85N
'50 PLYMIOUTH-2 door sedan, real nice
car. $345. University Oldsmobile, 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507. )86N
1950 FORD V-8 27door in excellent
shape. $395. University Oldsmobile. 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507 or 2-9626. )72N
BUSINESS SERVICES

)21G

FOR RENT
COED roommate to share 3 room apart-
ment. Call NO 8-6320. )30C
TRANSPORTATION
Drive a new car to
Florida-California
Seattle, Denver, Shreveport, La.
Gas paid. No waiting.
2465 Grand River
Detroit, Mich, (downtown)
Call Woodward 1-3990

REAL ESTATE
NEARLY NEW 4 bedroom ranch, $1,500
down, $75 monthly; near shopping
and bus. Price $8,950. Roswell Dillon,
Realtor. NO 3-4154. Eves. NO 5-4432 or
NO 8-9030. )4R
Read and Use ,
Daily Classifieds
DIAL 2-3136
TODAY AND THIRSnAY

6

SIEIEDS

r~

Many Opportunities Available
For Study in Scandinavia

By SUE JESSUP
University students are being
given an opportunity to study in
Scandinavia.
An explanation of this plan for
education abroad was given by
Aege Resendal Nielsen, executive
director of the American Scandi-
navian Council for Adult Educa-
tion, in an interview held today.
Nielsen explained that the two-
fold plan gives undergraduates a
chance to spend the junior year
abroad and also includes a pro-
gram for graduate study.
Full credit is given for academic
work completed in Europe. Expen-
ses include $1300 for board, room,
tuition and travel. Ten scholar-
ships are also available, Neilsen
added.
Before American students begin
actually studying they devote
about two months to orientation,
Neilsen stated. "They spend one
month living in a rural commun-
ity and another month in a city.
During this part of their stay
abroad students live with a non-
English speaking family which en-
ables them to learn a foreign lan-
guage.
Commenting enthusiastically on
this aspect of the plan, Nielsen
said, "Leating another language
provides new perspectives and in-
sights."
While actually studying stu-
dents live in residential colleges
and folk schools. "These colleges
consist of about 50 to 200 stu-
dents, which gives a good cross

section of the population;" Neil-
sen added.
Discussing the similarities be-
tween Scandinavia and the United
States, Neilsen stated, the eco-
nomic and social problems of these
two countries are similar. "How-
ever the challenge lies in solving
them differently. In Scandinavia
we have found room for both free
enterprise and social democracy,"
he said.
"We have solved our labor prob
lems so that few have too much
and few have too little," he add-
ed.
Neilsen believes that Scandina-
vian society has reached a fairly
high level of materialistic content-
ment.
Comparing the attitudes of U.S.
and European students, Neilsen
praised the idealism of Americans
and their receptiveness to new
ideas. He feels European students
tend to be more cynical and to
have less faith in the future.
Discussing the topic of democ-
racy Neilsen remarked that simply
because America has found a
fairly. workable plan of govern-
ment, this doesn't mean all demo-
cratic goals have been reached.
Students all over the world must
be free to continue questioning
and working toward new solutions
to age old problems, he added.
Even though European and
American students differ in many
ways they are both looking for
the answers to fundamental, phil-
osphical and ethical questions, he
concluded.

RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Lct us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade.
)4J
WE'D LIKE to crow about our low
student rates to Time, Life, Sports
Ill., etc., etc., etc. Student Periodical
2-3061.
MANUSCRIPT typing, pick-up and de-
livery service. HA 6-8170. G. Boh-
man. )26J
RICHARD MADDY-VIOLINMAKER
Fine, old certified instruments and
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )2J
SERVICE SHOP, 1217 S.A. Studio. 1317
S. Univ. )lJ
HI-F1
Components and Service Audio-
phmile, net prices. Telefunken Hi-
Fi, AM-FM shortwave radios. Serv-
ice on all makes of radios and phono-
graphs. Ann Arbor Radio and TV,
1217 S. University. Phone NO 8-7942.
1%2 blocks east of East Eng. )1J
WASHINGS -- Also ironings priyately.
Specializing in cotton dresses. Free
pick up and delivery. Phone NO 2-
9020. )9J

1I

dU

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Extra
BOWL GAMES
FRIDAY
John Wayne in "Blood Alley"

YOUR BIG RED LETTER DAY
w 1,14~"
- AW - - m - - - -- -s - - - it _rr ® r a A i!

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