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January 10, 1956 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-01-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, JAM

UARY 10, 1956

Chinese Artistic Influences
On Early Americans Noted

Our whole view of early Ameri-
can civilization Will, to a certain
extent, have to be considerably re-
vised in the future.
This was Professor Robert Heine-
Geldern's concluding remark in his
lecture yesterday on "Chinese In-
fluence In. the Art of America,"
first in a two lecture series.
Prof. Heine-Geldern, of the Uni-
versity of Vienna, used photogra-
phic slides to show the evidences
of Chinese and South Asian in-
fluence on courtries of the Pacific
by comparing art forms and their
designs, and tools and implements.
He began his lecture with the
age-old question, "Were our Ameri-
can civilizations developed inde-
pendently or influenced by Asian
civilizations?"
He answered this by indicating
similarities in style of sculptures
between those of China and those
of Indonesia and Borneo. Then
he pointed out likenesses in the
scale decorations of carved drag-
ons in China and New Zealand.
Traces of human occupation in
New Zealand are known by geolo-

gists to go as far back as 300 B.C.,
Prof. Heine-Geldern, who is with
the University of Chicago for a
year, said.
The lecturer, guest of the An-
thropology and Fine Arts Depts.,
went on to compare Chinese art
with that of Peru, the Honduras
and Eastern Mexico.
However, Prof. Heine-Geldern
said, the means of contact between
Asia and America have been open
to speculation. There is no existant
literature on the subject.
He pointed out that several
things besides gold might have
motivated voyages across the Pa-
cific. He also raised the element
of a ship's being blown by chance
off its course and ending up in
the Pacific countries and in Ameri-
ca.
Today Prof. Heine-Geldern will
pursue the subject further in his
second lecture, "Hindu-Buddhist
Influence in the Art of Meso-
America."
This talk, at 4:15 p.m. In Aud.
B, Angell Hall, will conclude his
discussion of prehistoric contacts
between Asia and America.

Tain't So!
PONTIAC, MICH.--His ring-
ing telephone is giving post-
Christmas nightmares to Fred
C. Sheldon of Bloomfield town-
ship:
An anonymous practical jok-
er ran an ad in a neighborhood
weekly giving Sheldon's phone
number and saying he would
pay 30 cents each for used
Christmas trees.
In the last few days Sheldon
has had to answer more than
100 phone calls with the word
"It's not so."
'Samaritan'
Chastised,
A "good samaritan's" illegal deed
has caused a Vermont village to
take pity on Frank G. McLenon,
'58E, who put a penny in an ex-
pired parking meter to save an
unknown driver from a fine.
McLenon was fined $11.85 last
Thursday by the Ann Arbor Traf-
fic Bureau for his "noble" deed.
Sunday evening McLenon re-
ceived a telegram from Waterbury,
Vt., stating that local citizens read
about the incident in the village
newspaper and are sending the en-
gineering freshman pennies - doz-
ens of them.
A city ordinance prohibits any-
one except the agent or associate
of a car owner or driver from ex-
tending parking meter time.
The "pennies for McLenon" drive
began in Waterbury Saturday
morning when Vermonter William
B. Mason began collecting pennies
in the local postoffice.
The coin which started the New
England furor was deposited by
McLenon in the 400 block of S.
State St. while a city patrolman
was preparing to ticket the car's
driver.
Rabies Clinic
A special rabies clinic will be
held from 4-7 p.m. today at the
Ann Arbor Armory, 223 E. Ann St.
Sponsored by members of Wash-
tenaw County Veterinarian Medi-
cal Society, the clinic will offer
a reduced rate of $1.50 per dog.

TOWN, COUNTRY CARS:
Gas Turbine, Electric Power
Predicted For Future Autos

Ten years from now, the aver-
age American family may have
two entirely different cars in its
garage -- a gas turbine-powered
cruiser for long trips at ultra-
high speed and a midget electric
auto for shopping and commuting.
This possibility was introduced
here yesterday by University of
Michigan automotive experts dur-
ing the annual meeting of the So-
ciety of Automotive Engineers.
Speaking of "The Next Decade
and the Automobile," the Univer-
sity participants touched upon
probable developments of automo-
bile engines, chassis and bodies.
Because today's cars are too
small for vacation-leisure time
transportation of larger families
and too large for everyday shop-
ping and commuting, multiple-car
ownership will be mandatory in
the future, reported Aarre K. Lah-
ti, associate professor of design.
One car will be longer and wid-
er than present station wagons,
capable of carrying a large fam-
ily with its vacation gear. It prob-
ably would be driven by a 200-
horsepower gas turbine engine, a
new lightweight powerplant with
many advantages over today's pis-
ton engines.
Charles Lipson, lecturer in me-
chanical engineering at the Uni-
versity, spoke of a similar "high-
way cruiser" that would be large,
luxurious and safe for speedy in-
tercity travel. Its greater speed
would call for better streamlining,

Lipson said, and might necessi-
tate body fins to reduce problems
in stability and steering.
The promise of plentiful electri-
city in the future from atom and
solar power plants suggests that
the commuting-shopping car be
driven by electricity, Lahti noted.
He calculated that the car would
be only about nine feet in length.
"The large used car is not the
solution for fulfilling the second
car needs; this second car must
be economical, small, quiet, smog
and trouble free," Lahti said.
"This car need not have a cruis-
ing range of more than 35 miles
a day, a cruising speed of 25 miles
an hour and a top speed of 35,"
Lahti said. "Its capacity need
not exceed that of two adults and
a child, plus sufficient space
for purchases and family-rearing
equipment."
The gas turbine holds promise
of competing with the reciprocat-
mg engine on weight, size and eco-
nomy basis, reported Professors of
Mechanical Engineering Frank L.
Schwartz and Edward T. Vincent.
This engine could provide the
automobile with a new sensation,"
one of "extreme smoothness and
rapid acceleration," they said.
The gas turbine will burn al-
most any liquid fuel, spinning a
turbine wheel with a blast of hot;
gases. The engine is simple and
rugged, possessing more power per
pound than the piston engine.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2- .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Siamese bracelet in Mason Hall.
Sentimental v a 1i e. Reward! B.
Houghton-5017 Stockwell. )106A
PERSONAL
TUTORING: Biology and related sub-
jects. Call NO 5-2762. Howard Harris.
)77F
PHYLLIS EICHMAN. NO 2-5553, Ext.
424. )7tF
I HAVE a brother named Jack. Alex-
andra van Becelaere. )79F
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single breasted model. Double
breasted tuxedos converted to single
breasted or shawl collar. Write to
Michaels Tailoring Co., 1425 Broad-
way, Detroit, Michigan for free details
or Phone Detroit WOodward 3-5776.
)75F
SAY HAPPY BIRTHDAY the different
way. Send friendly greetings to
friends by advertising in the MICHI-
GAN DAILY CLASSIFIED Section.
WANTED TO RENT*
CLEAN APARTMENT-for 2, 3, 4 men
with cooking, bath. NO 3-0521, Ext.
579. )12L
ROOMS FOR RENT
SINGLE room in excellent campus lo-
cation-for second semester. Phone

*NIFESZ,

=I

A new star emerges at the g f fh
DIAL 2-3136
"Transferring the book to the screen took a lot of doing
and Philip Dunne has accomplished his task with both
skill and taste. His picture is absorbing drama "
--N.Y. Journal American
roIPEY8 HEAD
The best seller that "Undresses Reputation"
now explodes on the State screen!
Extra! ROSE BOWL PICTURES!
(Author of "Barefoot Boy WitA Cheek, etc.)
VIVE LE POPCORN!
The other day as I was walking down the street picking up
tinfoil (Philip Morris, incidentally; has the best tinfoil, which
is not surprising when you consider that they have the best
cigarettes, which is not surprising when you consider that they
buy the best tobaccos and the best paper and put them together
with skill and loving care and rush them to your tobacco counter,
fresh and firm and loaded with gentle smoking pleasure to lull
the palate and beguile the senses and shoo the blues) the other
day, I say, as I was walking down the street picking up tinfoil
(I have, incidentally, the second largest ball of tinfoil in our
family. My brother Eleanor's is bigger-more than four miles
in diameter-but, of course, he is taller than I.) the other day,
as I was saying, while walking down the street picking up tinfoil,
I passed a campus and right beside it, a movie theatre which
specialized in showing foreign films. "Hmmmm," I said to my-
self, "I wonder how come so many theatres which specialize in
showing foreign films are located near campuses ?"
And the answer came right back to me: "Because foreign
films are full of culture, art, and esoterica, and where is culture
more rife, art more rampant, and esoterica more endemic than
on a campus? Nowhere, that's where!"

FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88; Sox,
39c; Shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )4B
STUDENT ROOM
RUG SPECIAL
9x12 cottons, all colors, priced
on sale now at $29.95
SMITH'S CARPET STORE
207 E. Washington NO 3-5536
COOKED and cleaned select cocktail
shrimp for the party, get-togethers at
Washington Fish Market, 208 E.
Washington, NO 2-2589. Free delivery.
) 3B
USED CARS
1949 HUDSON, 2-door, radio and heater.
One owner car. $195. Jinix White, Inc.
222 W. Washington, NO 2-5000. )101N
1951 DODGE, 4-door, radio and heater.
Automatic transmission. A good run-
ning car. $395.00. Jim White, Inc. 222
W. Washington. NO 2-5000. )102N
1950 MERCURY, 2-door, overdrive. A
good running car, $195. Jim White,
Inc., 222 W. Washington, NO 2-5000.
)103N
1949 FORD 4-door, black, radio & heat-
er, good rubber. Runs good. $215.
Jim White, Inc., 222 W. Washington,
NO 2-5000. )104N
JAGUAR
Sports Sedan-Seats 5.
Leather seats, walnut dash, etc.
Good condition. Selling at a loss.
$1395-terms. Phone NO 3-2090
after 8 any day. )100N
'51 FORD-radio, heater,doverdrive, $350;
'51 Kaiser 4-door, $225. "You get a
better deal" at Fitzgerald Inc., 3345
Washtenaw, NO 3-4197. )99N
1950 BUICK SPECIAL--2 door, one
owner car. University Oldsmobile, 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507. )95N
'50 PLYMOUTH Stationwagon, heater,
turn signals. Very nice shape. $445.
University Oldsmobile, 907 N. Main,
NO 3-0507. )85N
'50 PLYMOUTH-2 door sedan, real nice
car. $345. University Oldsmobile, 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507. )86N
1950 FORD V-8 2-door in excellent
shape. $395. University Oldsmobile. 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507 or 2-9626. )72N
PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICE
COMPLETE SERVICE on most items
including Graflex, Leica, Contax, Rol-
lie, etc. All work handled on our
repair bench. No mailing or delay.
PURCHASE CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University Phone NO 8-6972
)7S
BUSINESS SERVICES
RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade.
)4J

BUSINESS SERVICES
RICHARD MADDY-VIOLINMAKER
Fine, old certified instruments and
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )2J
SERVICE SHOP, 1217 S.A. Studio. 1317
S. Univ. )1J
HI--Fl
Components and Service Audio-
phmile, net prices. Telefunken Hi-
Fi, AM-FM shortwave radios. Serv-
ice on all makes of radios and phono-
graphs. Ann Arbor Radio and TV,
1217 S. University. Phone NO 8-7942.
11j blocks east of East Eng. )1J
WASHINGS - Also ironings privately.
Specializing in cotton dresses. Free
pick up and delivery. Phone NO 2-
9020. )9J
TRANSPORTATION
WOULD YOU LIKE to drive my Cadil-
lac Convertible to Berkeley, Calif.
around the end of the semester? I'll
pay for gas and oil. Call No 8-1511,
extension 590 during day or NO 2-
8745 evenings. )31G
Drive a new car to

Florida-California
Seattle, Denver, Shreveport, La.
Gas paid. No waiting.
2465 Grand River
Detroit, Mich. (downtown)
Call Woodward 1-3990
} 21G t
REAL ESTATE
NEARLY NEW 4 bedroom ranch, $1,500
down, $75 monthly; near shopping
and bus. Price $8,950. Roswell Dillon,
Realtor. NO 3-4154. Eves. NO 5-4432 or ,;
NO 8-9030. )4R

Organization Notices

Bob, NO 2-1147.

)9D

Congregational-Disciples Guild: In-
formal tea, today, 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.,
Guild House.
* s
Deutscher Verein: Kurt Truhn and
Caspar Grothwohl will speak tonight,
7:30 p.m., Room 3B, Union.
* * *
Episcopal Student Foundation: In-
quirer's lass (advanced), lecture-disus-
sion on "Early Christianity," tonight,
8:00 p.m., Canterbury House.
* s *
Hillel Foundation: Beginning and in-
termediate classes in Hebrew instruc-

tion, Jan. 11, 8:00 p.m., Hillel.
Cultural Committee, tonight, 7:00
p.m., Hillel.
Mass meeting of all Independents for
Hillelzapoppin, Jan. 11, 7:30 p.m., Hillel,
Social Committee meeting, tonight,
7:30 p.m., Hillel.
* * *
I1 Circolo Italiano: Chiacherata, Club
600, South Quad, today, 3:15 p.m.
* * *
Interguild: Professor John Reed will
speak on "Christianity and Intellect-
a Contradiction?" Jan. 11, 4:15 p.m.,
Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
S e
Junior Interfraternity Council: Offi-
cer elections for spring semester posi-
tions, Jan. 11, 7:30 p.m.
Women's League: Women's Senate
will meet Jan. 11, 4:00 p.m., Henderson
Room of the League.

s
-

II

CHRISTIANITY AND INTELLECT

FOR RENT
COED roommate to share 3 room apart-
ment. Call NO 8-6320. )300
HELP WANTED
SILENT TYPIST part time 6-10 hours.
Pay well. Schedule and salary flexible.
Reply to Box 12D. )61H
WANTED - Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Excellent salary. Morning de-
livery, no collecting. Call NO 2-3241.
)29H
WANTED-cab drivers. Full or part
time. Apply 113 S. Ashley, Ann Arbor.
Yellow and Checker Cab Company,
phone NO 8-9382. )6H
FOR SALE
TUXEDO, $20. Like New. Double-Breast-
ed. Black, Fit-al vest, Medium-Tall.
Camels hair overcoat, $15, short.
Symphony albums, $1. Books, $.25.
119 Virginia. NO 2-1590. )31B
SIAMESE KITTENS for sale. Papers
available. Siamese cat stud service.
NO 2-9020. )104B
Need a haircut?
Have it done by the experts
See your U of M Barbers
Today!
715 North University

Classifieds'

Read
Daily

A contradiction?

a

11

11

PROFESSOR JOHN REED
Lecture and Discussion
Tomorrow at 4:15 P.M.
Auditorium A, Angell Hall

2..
.9*.
*.* . *
*
'±9

-Mr

I

FARMER'S
MARKET.
Detroit Street
Open Wednesday and Saturday
for
Farm-Fresh Fruits, Vegetables,
Poultry and Eggs

I

IL

U ~ -

I

1I

FRANCIS RAYMOND
LINE
Personally Narrates His
Great Color Documentary Film
MONUMENT
VALLEY
ADVENTURE
Featuring Navajo Indian. Life
Fabulous Uranium Mining
West's Spectacular Scenic
Splendour
- SUNDAY ---
January 15, 3:00 P.M.
PATTENGILL AUDITORIUM
105 South State Street
General Admission $1.00

Dramatic Arts Center presents
_ ' ' tk

1

I know where to catch you
at lunch time tomorrow -
You'll be enjoying that good
noon buffet at the Golden

I

Apples Room.

8uq the saetn . Iau 6'aIou*!
We proudly manufacture' and distribute the only
Official University of Michigan Ring . . . Stop
in and see our selection ... Most Rings Available
for immediate delivery.
4 g d(llwu Co'tpamt~
1321 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVENUE
A few short steps from the corner of Washtenaw
and South University

1I

! i

FINAL WEEK ... Wed. thru Sat. 8:15
Matinee Sunday, Jan. 15, 2:30 P.M.

DIAL NO 2-2513
Today and Wednesday

I

.e kej hop in he71 tuebekrlto d IOW1.ef
I hope that all of you have been taking advantage of the
foreign film theatre near your campus. Here you will find no
simple-minded Hollywood products -full of treacly sentiment
and machine-made bravura. Here you will find life itself -life
in all its grimness, its poverty, its naked, raw passion!
Have you, for instance, seen the recent French import, Le
Jardin de Ma Tante ("The Kneecap"), a savage and uncom-
promising story of a man named Claude Parfum, whose con-
suming ambition is to get a job as a meter reader with the
Paris water department? But he is unable, alas, to afford the
flashlight one needs for this position. His wife, Bon-Bon, sells
her hair to a wigmaker and buys him a flashlight. Then, alas,
Claude discovers that one also requires a leatherette bow tie.
This time his two young daughters, Caramel and Nougat, sell
their hair to the wigmaker. So Claude has his leatherette bow-tie,
but now, alas, his flashlight battery is burned out and the whole
family, alas, is bald.
Or have you seen the latest Italian masterpiece, La Donna E
Mobile ("I Ache All Over"), a heart shattering tale of a boy and
his dog? Malvolio, a Venetian lad of nine, loves his little dog
with every fibre of his being. He has one great dream: to enter
the dog in the annual dog show at the Doge's palace. But that,
alas, requires an entrance fee, and Malvolio, alas, is penniless.
However, he saves and scrimps and steals and finally gets enough
together to enter the dog in the show. The dog, alas, comes in
twenty-third. Malvolio sells him to a vivisectionist.
Or have you seen the new Japanese triumph, Kibutzi-San
("The Radish"), a pulse-stirring historical romance about
Yamoto, a poor farmer, and his daughter Ethel who are accosted
by a warlord on their way to market one morning ? The warlord

=. t,

327 S. 4th Ave. (Masonic Temple)

-

Invest
Your
Christmas
Money
Today!

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ROMTMITCflTi

-1

Buy the I

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