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January 07, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-01-07

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"1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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HEADS PHILOSOPHY HONORS:
Henle Compares French, U.S. Studies

Boston Pops Orchestra
To Perform Tomorrow

F 4

IIEIS&

By CAROL PRINS
A slight, bespectacled man with
a friendly smile describes Prof.1
Paul Henle of the philosophy de-
partment.
Prof. Henle, head of the depart-
ment honors program and the re-
cipient of a Fulbright Scholarship,
spent last year studying and doing
research in France.
The Harvard-educated profes-
sor's research was done on the re-
lation of philosophy and the so-
cial sciences in France. Prof.
Henle explained, "In France, phil-
osophers and social scientists ac-
cept many facts just on the basis
of common-sense, which enables
them to work more closely to-
gether.
"In this country philosophers
and social scientists are critical of
common-sense beliefs and want
other sorts of proof."
'After You've Seen Paris'
The Henle family spent the year
"getting acquainted" with Paris.
John, the Henles' eight year old
son, attended a French school, and
their younger son Jimmy "just
had, a good time exploring the
neighborhood around our apart-
ment, which was located near the
Ecole Militaire and the Eiffel
b. Tower."
When questioned about his trav-
els in Europe, Prof. Henle said
with a twinkle in his eye, "You
know after you've seen Paris there
isn't much else to see.
"However we did spend the sum-
mer in Majorca, a lovely sunny
island off the coast of Spain," he
added.
Prof. Henle praised the French
educational system. "A French
professor has a much harder time
becoming. a professor but he has
a much easier time afterward than
American professors do," he said.
He compared the nine hour a
week teaching load of an American
professor to the three teaching
hours of a French professor.
Formal But Carefree
French students still cling to'
touches of formality in universi-
ties, Prof. Henle said, citing the
habit of rising on the entrance'
'U' Japan Center
A Social Science Research Cen-;
ter sponsored by The University
of Michigan Center for Japanese
Studies has recently been dedi-
cated at Okayaina University,
Japan.1
The new center replaces the
University's field station in Okay-]
ama which served as a base for
research on Japanese life from]
1950 until the present.

PROF. PAUL HENLE ... Philosopher describes France

of a professor in a lecture hall as
an example.
"However French students are
not as formal as this always," he
smiled, "they are just as carefree
as American college students."
University students in France
study in a much different manner
than Americans, Prof. Henle said,

explaining that no day-to-day as-
signments are made. The student
studies at his own pace and take's
a comprehensive exam at the end
of one or two years.
Upon returning from Europe,
Prof. Henle took over the philo-
sophy department's honors pro-
gram.

Opening with "Polonaise" from
"Eugene Onegin" by Tschaikovsky,
the Boston Pops Tour Orchestra
will present the third concert in
the Extra Series at 8:30 p.m. to-
morrow in Hill Auditorium.
Nationally known for its radio
and television appearances and
more than 150 recordings, the Pops
will be conducted by Arthur Fied-
ler.
Continuing the first half of the
program will be Overture to "The
Barber of Seville" by Rossini;
Fantasia on "Greensleeves" by
Vaughan-Williams; and Suite from
"Graduation Bail" by Strauss.
After the first intermission, the
group will play "Rhapsody on a
Theme of Paganini" for piano and
orchestra by Rachmaninoff, with
Ruth Slenczynska as soloist; and
"The Sorcerer's Apprentice" by
Dukas.
Following a second intermission
the Pops will play "Popsorama" ar-
ranged by Mason; "On the Trail"
from "Grand Canyon Suite" by
Groge; and "Look Sharp - Be
Sharp" by Merrick-Bennett.
Taking over the baton of the
Pops in 1930, Fiedler is also a
sought-after guest conductor for
the major symphony orchestras.
He has had the longest tenure with
the same orchestra of any sym-
phony conductor in the country.
Piano soloist with the Boston
Pops, Miss Slencynska, is a former
prodigy who has appeared in
movies, on the radio and has been
engaged by major orchestras in
this country and in Europe.
Moore Elected
Prof. Franklin G. Moore of the
industrial management depart-
ment was recently elected presi-
dent of the Academy of Manage-
ment at a meeting held in New
York City.
The Academy is a national or-
ganization composed of teachers
of management and administratorsI
of business concerns.
Prof. Moore will hold office for
one year.
-I
Organization
Notices

Making her first professional ap-
pearance at age four, Miss Slen-
czynska played for European audi-
ences at the age of six.
In Europe she studied with such
greats as Rachmaninoff and Cor-
tot.
At the outbreak of the World
War II, Miss Slencznska returned
to the University of California to
major in psychology and continuef
her music studies. She later taught
at the San Francisco Academy of
Music and has returned to her vo-
cation of concert work.
Tickets are available at the of-
fices of the University Musical So-
ciety in Burton Tower.
Movie Stars, -
Parade Thrill
Contest Queen
By RICHARD TAUB
A year ago Patricia Risk, '59,
would never have dreamed of a
trip to Hollywood, visits to movie
studios, making the rounds of
night clubs, and participating in
the Rose Bowl parade.
Yet this is what happened when
she was chosen as "Queen of Lib-
erty" in a nationwide contest
sponsored by a frozen food con-
cern.
"It was really exciting. There
were press conventions, photogra-
phers taking pictures, and I met
Jeff Chandler, Audie Mur'phy and
gobs and gobs of movie stars. I
was supposed to have a date with
Tab Hunter, but it never could
be worked out," Pat said.
Hates to Enter Contests
Pat, who is from Muskegon,
was chosen from her picture, along,

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-blue leather wallet. Reward.
Call NO 2-5553 Ext. 217 any evening.
)105A
PERSONAL
DON'T FRET little Bunny. It's a grand
old age. Have a very Happy Birthday,
as life turns another page. -Pat.
)76F
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single breasted model. Double
breasted tuxedos converted to single
breasted or shawl collar. Write to
Michaels Tailoring Co., 1425 Broad-
way, Detroit, Michigan for free details
or Phone Detroit WOodward 3-5776.
)75F
SAY HAPPY BIRTHDAY the different
way. Send friendly greetings to
friends by advertising in the MICHI-
GAN DAILY CLASSIFIED Section.
WANTED TO RENT
$10 to person giving lead to furnished
3 man campus apartment-that we
rent-for next semester. Call NO 2-
3219 and ask for McKellar after' 4
p.m. )11L1
TWO MALE SENIORS desire apartment
on or near campus for spring semes-
ter. Phone NO 2-5261. )9L
FOR RENT
COED roommate to share 3 room apart-
ment. Call NO 8-6320. )30C
ROOMS FOR RENT
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL Foundation
Dormitory applications for rooms for
spring semester now available at
Foundation office-1429 Hill. Week
days 9-12 and 1-5. )8D
HELP WANTED
WANTED - Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Excellent salary. Morning de-
livery, no collecting. Call fO 2-3241.
)29H
YOUNG WOMAN to attend 2 children,
Ages 1 and 4. Full time, transporta-
tion furnished, Box 11D, Michigan
Daily. )59H

USED CARS
1950 MERCURY, 2-door, overdrive. A
good running car, $195. Jim White,
Inc., 222 W. Washington, NO 2-5000.
) 103N
1949 FORD 4-door, black, radio & heat-
er, good rubber. Runs good. $215.
Jim White, Inc., 222 W. Washington,
NO 2-5000. )104N
JAGUAR
Sports Sedan-Seats S.
Leather seats, walnut dash, etc.
Good condition. Selling at a loss.
$1395-terms. Phone NO 3-2090
after 6 any day. )100N
'51 FORD-radio, heater, overdrive, $350;
'51 Kaiser 4-door, $225. "You'get a
better deal" at Fitzgerald Inc., 3345
Washtenaw, NO 3-4197. )99N
1950 BUICK SPECIAL-2 door, one
owner car. University Oldsmobile, 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507. )95N
'50 PLYMOUTH Stationwagon, heater,
turn signals. Very nice shape. $445.
University Oldsmobile, 907 N. Main,
NO 3-0507. )85N
'50 PLYMOUTH-2 door sedan, real nice
car. $345. University Oldsmobile, 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507. )86N
1950 FORD V-8 2-door in excellent
shape. $395. University Oldsmobile. 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507 or 2-9626. )72N
PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICE
COMPLETE SERVICE on most items
including Graflex, Leica, Contax, Rol-
lie, etc. All work handled on our
repair bench. No mailing or delay.
PURCHASE CAMERA SHOP
11'16 S. University Phone NO 8-6972
)7S
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING - Thesis, Term papers, etc.
Reasonable Rates Prompt Service, 830
South Main, NO 8-7590. )15J
DAY CARE for 1 or 2 pre-school chil-
dren. Call NO 8-7714. )15J
RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth'holes
rewbven. Let us save your cloth s.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade.
)4J

BUSINESS SERVICES
HI-F1
Components and Service Audio
phmile, net pricep. Telefunken Hi.
Fi, AM-FM shortwave radios. Serv
ice on all makes of radios and phono
graphs. Ann Arbor Radio and TV
1217 S. University. Phone NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eug. )1
WASHINGS -- Also ironings privately
Specializing in cotton dresses. Free
pick up and delivery, Phone NO 2,
9020. )9,
TRANSPORTATION
WOULD YOU LIKE to drive my Cadil.
lac Convertible to Berkeley, Cal
around the end of the semester? ril
pay for gas and oil. Call No 3-1511
extension 590 during day or NO 2
8745 evenings. )31C
Drive a new car to
Florida-California
Seattle, Denver, Shreveport, La
Gas paid. No waiting.
2465 Grand River
Detroit, Mich. (downtown)
Call Woodward 1-3990
)21(
REAL ESTATE
NEARLY NEW 4 bedroom ranch, $1,500
down, $75 monthly; near shopping
and bus. Price $8,950. Roswell Dillon
Realtor. NO 3-4154. Eves. NO 5-4432 o:
NO 8-9030. )41:

CARS, FAT AND ALCOHOL:
Doctor Cites Today's Three
Major Health Problems

Read

C lass ifieds-'

Modern-day society faces a triple
threat to health.
According to Dr. H. Marvin Pol-
lard of the Medical School, alco-
holism, obesity and traffic acci-
dents "are the three health prob-
lems of our culture which require
immediate attention."
Death For Granted
Dr. Pollard believes these prob-
lems have been partially ignored
because of a kind of cynicism. "For
some time," he commented, "we
seemed to take it for granted that
deaths were bound to take place
on the highways, or that a certain
proportion of drunkeness was to
be expected."
In Dr. Pollard's opinion, alco-
holism not only accounts for un-
necessary deaths, it leads to "pro-
longed incapacitation and to so-
cial and family disturbances."

The doctor suggested that a drug
which reduced alcohol's exhilirat-
ing or toxic effects and perhaps
remove the incentive fordrink
might be developed.
Dr. Pollard said automobile ac-
cidents seem to take the place of
organized warfare with speed re-
placing bullets and bayonets.
He added obesity was no longer
a laughing matter. "Fat is a
curse, not a joke," he commented.
It can lead to diabetes, high blood
pressure, and-heart and gall blad-
der ailments.
But a Fraction
Although research on the trio
of problems is being done at sev-
eral institutions, Dr. Pollard main-
tains "the surface has barely been
scratched."
He pointed out that people in-
dulge in all three habits to such
an extent financially that "if we
had but a fraction of the money
spent for high and -fast living, we
might make some headway to-
ward solving these crucial prob-
lems.
"No one can deny that the death
bell has tolled long enough," Dr.
Pollard continued. "Now some-
thing more than moral indigna-
tion or lip service must be paid to
call these needless deaths to a
halt."

RICHARD M#.DDY-VIOLINMAKER
Fine, old certified instruments and
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )2J
SERVIQE SHOP, 1217 S.A. Studio. 1317
S. Univ. )1J
ENJOY

Daily

Carry-Out
Service
at the

Deer & Wine
Served

Today and RPI EUM 1:304P.M.
Sunday 65c
Mr. .aughton plays the windjand
bibulous curmudgeon right down to C]I rL91'II1
the ground " -Crowther, I L
New York Times
w9
/ Hobsoxis
E*rae-eMADCAtMAGU Unit CArtoon
"A chuckling piece bubbling
over with god humr"
Extra -- "MA DCA P MAGOO" U.P.A. Cartoon

Congregational Disciples Guild: Jan.
8, 7:00 p.m., Prof. Kenneth Boulding
will speak on "Time To Spare," Con-
gregational Church.
* *«*
Episcopal Student Foundation: Lec-
ture by the Rev. C. R. Adams on "The
Meaning of Christmas & Epiphany,"
Jan. 8, 7:00 p.m., Canterbury House.
Graduate Outing Club: Jan. 8, 2:00
p.m., Northwest entrance to Rackham
Bldg.
« * *
Hillel Foundation: Mass meeting of
all Independents for Hillelzapoppin,
Jan. 11, 7:30 p.m., Hillel.
Saturday morning Sabbath services,
9:00 a.m., Hillel.
Student Zionist Organization will
have a film, "Tent City;" a discussion
will folbw. Jan. 8, 8:15 p.m., Hillel.
Sunday night Supper Club followed
by record tance, Jan. 8, 6:00 p.m., Hil-
lel.
1* 1.
Lutheran 0tudent Association: Prof.
Anil K. De, P.H.D. in Chemistry, will
speak on "Hinduism" at 7:00 p.m.,
Jan. 8. This will open a series on
"Know the Religions of the World."
There will be a supper at 6:00 p.m. at
the Lutheran Student Center, Forest
and Hill.
* * *
Michigan Christian Fellowship: Cleo
Buxton, General Secretary of Officers'
Union, will speak, Jan. 8, 4:00 p.m.,
Lane Hall.
Philippine - Michigan Club: Monthly
meeting, Jan. 8, 2:30 p.m., Rm. 3B,
Union.
SRA: Folk Dancing, Jan. 9, 7:30 to
10:00 p.m., in the recreation room of
Lane Hall. Instruction for every dance,
and beginners are welcome.
* «**
Undergraduate Mathematics Club:
Jan. 9, 7:30 p.m., Gerald Pavlik will
speak on "Topics in Group Theory,"
Rmn. 3L, Union.
Wesleyan Guild: Those going to the
M-MSU Hockey Game will meet at
7?:00 p.m., tonight, Wesley Lounge.

1
i
!
tI
I

PATRICIA RISK
... "Queen of Liberty"

with four other girls. There were
4,500 entrants.
"My uncle sent in the picture
without my knowing it. If I had
known I would have stopped it.
I hate to enter contests."
The five girls went to Holly-
wood where they appeared on the
Queen for a Day radio program.
The queens of the past year elect-
ed Pat "Queen of Liberty."
As queen she 'received many
presents including a TV set, a
radio and a wardrobe. She also
asked to have playground equip-
ment sent to a summer camp for
underprivileged children where she
works.
Roses and Red Underwear
On the day of the parade she
had to get up at 4:30 a.m. to have
pictures taken and to receive last
minute instructions. "It was so
cold I had to wear red underwear.
Some photographers from Life and
the Post took pictures and they
should be in next year."
Pat had done a little modeling
in Muskegon, but "nothing really
professional." She is planning to
major in speech and dramatics.

WANTED-cab drivers. Full or part
time. Apply 113 5. Ashley. Ann Arbor.
Yellow and Checker Cab Company,
phone NO 8-9382. )6H
NELSON International House'is now
accepting applications for house par-
ents or house mother. Preferably
Univ. affiliated. 26 or over. Steward
and social responsibilities. Phone Pe-
ter Barnard, NO 3-8506, 915 Oakland.
)60H
FOR SALE
TUXEDO, $20. Like New. Double-Breast-
ed. Black, Fit-all vest, Medium-Tall.
Camels hairovercoat, $15, short.
Symphony albums, $1. Books, $.25.
119 Virginia. NO 2-1590. )31B
TUXEDO for sale-$20. Size 38. Call
NO 3-2619. )106B
SIAMESE KITTENS for sale. Papers
available. Siamese cat stud service.
NO 2-9020. )104B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxford4-$6.88; Sox,
39c; Shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )4B
STUDENT ROOM
RUG SPECIAL
9x12 cottons, all colors, priced
on sale now at $29.95
SMITH'S CARPET STORE
207 E. Washington NO 3-5536
COOKED and cleaned select cocktail
shrimp for the party, get-togethers at
Washington Fish Market, 208 E.
Washington, NO 2-2589. Free delivery.
)3B
USED CARS
1949 HUDSON, 2-door, radio and heater.
One owner car. $195. Jim White, Inc.
222 W. Washington, NO 2-5000. )101N
1951 DODGE, 4-door, radio. and heater.
Automatic transmission. A good run-
ning car. $395.00. Jim White, Inc. 222
W. Washington. NO 2-5000. ) 102N

Del Rio Restaurant
122 West Washington at Ashley
Open 11 A.M. to 12 P.M.

CLOSED TUESDAY

r

4Cinema juiI4
Saturday at 7 and 9
Sunday at 8 only

Telephone NO 2-9575

I

"LA.URA"'

I

with
Dana Andrews, Clifton Webb,
Gene Tiernby
Architecture Auditorium
50c

I

a

4

I

Late Show Tonight 11P.M.

1

Last Perfmorane at 8 P.M
Box Office Open Daily 10 A.M. - Curtain Time
"Sex, Humor, Pathos - All Brilliantly Combined"

A new star emergesat the
DIAL 2-3136

WUERTH
STARTING FRIDAY
I/FE and LOOK
called it %THE WICKEDEST
CITY IN THE UNITED STATES'
arm a
P E NIX
Ifs flaming expose won the
PULITZER PRIZE
for the Columbus Ledger!
ALSO
.
TENSION
..to set your
nerves afirel '> .4

"- - . vibrant and
stunning beauty, in
an absorbingly dra-
mctic film. Dana
Wynters has all, the
qualifications f o r
stardom;"
-N.Y. Daily News

"There is a strange
fascination in the
film that is unusual
and provocative. The

most shining,
is a beautiful
girl named
Wynters."

asset
young
Dana

I

--N.Y. Herald-
Tribune

"Transferring the book to the screen took a lot of doing
and Philip Dunne has accomplished his task with both
skill and taste. His picture is absorbing drama!"
-N.Y. Journal American

liEVlEW ~ox

3* -~ 7 ~ ~ A~ ~. I! U

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