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January 06, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN R' !Y V

A'te' " JtWYrfklMVV A lAMM

a

THE MICIGAN IATLV =W w - - J

AINUR 6,~~ 195

P

?I' Hockey Squad In va es astansing

Tonight

NTRAMURAL BASKETBALL:
Farouk's Five,_Phi Delta Phi Take IM Cage Contests

pse-M eState lcers
Play Here Saturday Night

The victors completely control-
ed the boards as they averaged
six inches height advantage over
their rivals. Ron Dingham led the
winners with 14 points. Little Gabe
Coyoca performed well for the
losers.

Other House's fast break com-
bination of Frank Haedel and Dan
Hadley were the decisive factors
in its 46-36 victory over Newman
Club.
Charley O'Meha was brilliant
in a losing cause.

NOTICE!

NEW SHIPMENT

I

The Pill Pushers playing with
only four men were overcome by
Owen Co-op, 44 to 33. Tom Rudd,
a fine ballhandler and play maker,
carried his team to victory.
Phi Delta Phi's big fast team roll-
ed over hepless Alpha Rho Chi, 67
to 11. Alpha Rho Chi was com-
pletely helpless in every depart-
ment. Top man for the victors
was Dick Myers.
Phi Delta Epsilon Wins
Phi Delta Epsilon coached by
Fred Horwitz edged . Phi Delta
Chi, 30-28, as Norm Bolton hit
for 19 points. It was a close con-
test all the way but Bolton, deadly,
from the outside and a good man
close under, was the difference.
Foresters with all six footers
and better at every position con-
quered Congregational Disciples
Guild, 34 to 21. The Big Green
had tremendous ball control as
well as control of the boards.
Guild's back court men had dif-
ficulty bringing the ball up, as
the Foresters continually, inter-
cepted their passes.
Perhaps two of the best players
in intramural competition per-
formed last night-the Seldom
Seen Kids' Jack Watson who does
everything well, and Bill Thurs-I
ton who has a fine variety shots
from any place on the floor.
These two outstanding per-
formers combined talent to lead
their team to a 58 to 12 triumph
over the Penthouse Five.
I-M Scores
Globe Trotters 38, Men-no Mice 24
Phagocytes 27, Cardinals 17
Bermuda-Bombers 41, Latvians 2fi
Delta Sigma Phi 43, Al Kappa Kappa 20
Nu Sigma Nu 54, Phi Pho Sigma 19
Alpha Chi Sigma 25, Delta Theta Phi 24,
Phi Alpha Delta 36, Law Club 20
Alpha Omega 25, Psi Omega 21
MCF over Raccoons, forfeit
AFROTC45, Michigan Co-op 13
Evans Scholars 34, CMF Sophs 16

MICH A S TE GOALIE Ed Scbiller has rated as one of the
WIHL's bt for three years. ie is co-captain with defenseman
John Poloasy.

SHETLAND

By LYNN TOWLE
Hoping to start the new year
right, the Michigan hockey team
journeys to East Lansing today
and then plays at home tomorrow
for a home-away series with
Michigan State.
The game at State, worth one
point in the Western Intercolleg-
iate Hockey ; League standings,
since the teams will meet four
times this season, begins at 8
p.m.
Tomorrow evening the game at
the Coliseum here will begin also
at 8 p.I. Tickets may be puchased
at the Athletic Administration
Building today and tomorrow.
Game Televised
Tonight's contest at Demonstra-
tin Hall will be televised in the
Ann Arbor area over station
WPAG, Channel 20.
In the 32-game rivalry with the
Spartans, the Wolverines have
won 30, lost one, and tied one.
The only time the Spartans have
defeated Michigan was back in
1927. MSU was able to hold Coach
Vic Heyliger's squad to a thrilling
scoreless tie in 1954.
State, although its cellar stand-
ings in the WIHL don't seem to
indicate it now, is always a
"tough team to beat." Heyliger
believes that his team's perform-
ance against the Spartans will be
a good indication of how Michigan
will look against the United States
Olympic team next Wednesday
evening.
' Heyliger Fears Let-Down
He fears a possible let-down
against the Spartans as his team
may be looking ahead too much
toward the game with the Olymp-
ians.
The game tonight could very
well set the tone of the two-game
series. Competition between these
two rivals has often been heated
in the long hockey history.
"The League's seven teams are
even enough, so that we want to
get as many points as we' can,
early," says Heyliger. "The six
games coming up are the most
important - this weekend with
MSU, next weekend with Minne-
sota in Ann Arbor, and the follow-.
ing weekend again with MSU."
Buchanan Recovered
Michigan's Neil Buchanan suf-
fered a shoulder separation dur-
ing the Christmas holidays, but
has been scrimmaging with the
team this week and will play in
the weekend series. He will alter-

nate on the second line defense
with brother Mike Buchanan and
Bernie Hanna.
On the second offensive line
Heyliger is shifting Neil McDonald
to the center slot and Don Mc-
Intosh to right wing. "I feel that
McDonald will be better in that
position and I want to see how it
goes," he says.
Michigan State has won one
game against five loses in League
action. The lone victory came in
a 4-3 decision over Denver. Michi-
gan won one game from Denver,
6-2, and tied the other, 3-3. The
Spartans have a 3-7 overall, re-
cord.
Sophomore center Ross Parke
is pacing the Spartan scoring at-
tack with five goals and six as-
sists in League play. Right behind

i

CREW NECK

SWEATERS
[iDES .. . 1 9

JUNIOR WING for the Spartans is Gene Grazia, who is leading
the team in League scoring with six goals in six games.

GUS STAGER

TICE &;WCbheil/p Men

NEIL BUCHANAN
... slowed by injury
him is wing Gene Grazia, who has
six goals and three assists.
MSU Goalie. Sharp
Goalie Ed Schiller (no relation
to Michigan defenseman Bob Sch-
iller) is considered to be one of
the better goalies in the WIHL.
This season he has been having
a rather bad year, but can be
on a good night as oustanding. as
any of the League's netminders.
Third-place Michigan has not
had much time this week to scrim-
mage because the team did no
practicing over the vacation until
last Saturday. Heyliger agrees
that the vacation did give in-
jured players Wally Maxwell, Bill
MacFarland, and Tom Rendall
time to recover.

i

By ALAN JONES

ss from Ann Arbor Bank
A. to 5:30 P.M.

Swim, swam, swum!
This old swimming phrase very
ably sums up the life of Michi-
gan's young swimming coach, Gus
iStager.
Hailing from the East, Stager

began hi swi n at pionship teams in four years. His
Newark Acnn p 5lOO m teams were undefeated for two of
NewJerse.he was t thos years
standing in the10::d100 toeyas
yard fHis swimmers there still hold
outside emoffive of the eight state records, and
the Athey also broke five national
Het A d n scholastic marks. While Stager
World r20was coach there, Dearborn Ford-
months n n and son was regarded as the power-
Asiatic he I house in Michigan high school
swam as p- swimming,
pines tam i the Olympics. Now Stager, who is married and
winning te 400 ylrd eret and has two children, and his associ-
was a memer of the campionship ate, Bruce Harlan, the diving
800 yard festy coach, are in their second year of
Stag(er enrd n in Sep-
tember of 16 nnon a swim-,,
m -cng letter four stagh-ears. He G
hit his e the great Tikets for the hockey game
coaching c a nn whom he between Michigan and the U.
was later to succee as Michi- S. Olympic Hockey team in
gan's head ium coach. Detroit, next Wednesday, are
AAmea a M an on sale at the Athletic Admin-
S etrdrtimes istration Building for $1, $2,
Stagr trnnd .93 tims -' '
in the 200 and yad freestyle ad .
events as a sohomore. Hfe was Roundtrip bus transportation
named to th aosle Coches All- ( 150) along with $2 tickets
Ame:ican c1 er he com- w3i be on sale this afternoon at
peted, and a a ner of Michi- the nin from 3 - 5 and to-
gan's BigTen a NCAA chain- morrow afternoon from 1 - 5.
pions in
The former e and Blue directing the Michigan swimming
star went on to Dearborn Fordson team. As successors to Matt Mann,
High School afr his graduation they can be very proud of the
from Michigm in 1950. He runner-up spot they earned in the
coached the s,:o swimming team Big-Ten last year, topped only by
and turned out the ste cham- Ohio State's powerhouse.

Complex Hockey Rules Prove
Confusing to Average Fans
By AL SCHWARZ I

First in a two-part series
There is little, if any, doubt in
the minds of Michigan students of
the great potentialities of this
year's hockey squad, but there'
seems to be some doubt pertaining
to the principles and rules of
hockey.
The game is started with a face-
off-the dropping of the puck by
the referee between the opposing
centers.
The rink itself is divided into
three equal parts by two blue lines.
The center section is the neutral
zone, while the other two sections
serve as either the offensive or
defensive zone, depending on
which section a team's own goal
is in.
Ice Infractions
Off-sides occur when a player

is over the opponents blue line
and receives a pass frbm a team-
mate who is not over the blue
line, or if a player skates across
the opposing team's blue line be-
fore the man with the puck does.
Icing the puck occurs when a
player shoots the puck from be-
hind his own blue line across the
goal line of the opposing side and
one of the opposing team members
touches the puck first. When icing
takes place, there is a face-off at
the end of the ice from which the
puck was originally shot.
It should be noted that if a
team has less men on the ice than
the customary six because of
penalty, icing can not be called.
Because of this icing is commonly
used to waste time when a team
has a player in the penalty box.

has a player in the penalty box.

1
ENMTuRY
1V

SALE!

To Teh- 4eci hefore Inventory--and the arrival of our Spring Shipments ... We bring you
ii e : y or the greatest savings ever. In many instances more than 50%. Read the tre-
m :hd11 I,,r ch comes to you at this time.

r
$3- SUIT3 -OW$532
$4 5- SUTS -NOW 336
-5- - ' TS'- NOW$4
$ _.- J,,T_ - NOW . 4 7
$65 - -T - NOW $52

TOPCOATS
$35--Topcoats.---NOW $28
$40-Topcoats-NOW $32
$45-Topcoats-NOW $36
$50-Topcoats-NOW $40
$65-Topcoats-NOW $52

SPORT COATS
$17.50 Sportcoats, now $14
$25.00 Sportcoats, now $20
$29.50 Sportcoats, now
$23.60
$32.50 Sportcoats, now $26
$35.00 Sportcoots, now $28

SLACKS
$ 8.95 Slacks, now $ 6.36
$10.95 Slacks, now $ 8.76
$12.95 Slacks, now $10.36
$14.95 Slacks, now $11.96
$16.95 Slacks, now $13.56

.

,OU CAN EXPECT MORE VALUE AT RABIDEAU-HARRIS-AND YOU WILL NEVER BE DISAPPOINTED

570 N.":.
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RE RIS W BUY ONE AT REGU-
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GLOVES $1.95 to $5.95, NOW ..........
SHORTS $1.50to $2.95, NOW ....... ....
SCARFS $1.50 to $3.00, NOW ...........
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READ-HERE IS HOW. BUY ONE AT REGU..
LAR PRICE, 2ND ONE FOR $1,

'F



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