100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 04, 1956 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-01-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sixty-Sixth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICH. * Phone NO 2-3241

Medical Consultation

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

When Opinions Are Free,
Truth Will Prevail

Editorials printed in The' Michigan Daily are written by -members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only. This must be noted in all reprints.
NIGHT EDITOR: LEW HAMBURGER
GOP Still Following
Outmoded Isolationist Policies

THE Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication. Notices
for the Sunday edition must be in
by 2 p.m. Friday.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 1956
VOL. LXVII, NO. 67
General Notices
Regent's Meeting: Fri., Jan. 27. Com-
munications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands not later than Jan. 19.
Beginning Jan. 2, 1956, Health Service
Clinic hours will be supplemented by
service from 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Mon. through Fri. and 1:00 p.m. to
6:00 p.m. Saturdays, Sundays, and holi-
days. There will be a physician in the
building during these hours. There will
be a,charge of $2.00 for each such visit.
Adjunct diagnostic service and special
treatment will be charged for a cur-
rent rates.
J-Hop Weekend. Social chairman of
student groups participating in J-Hop
Weekend, Feb. 10, 11, 1956 should file

application for approval for specific
events on or before Jan. 27, in the
Office of Student Affairs, 1020 Ad-
ministration Building.
Fraternities housing women guests
for the weekend must clear housing
arrangements in the Office of the Dean
of Women, 1514 Administration, before"
applications for specific parties are
presented to the Office of Student Af-
fairs. Inasmuch as individual overnight
permissions cannot be granted to wo-
men students until social events have
been finally approved, it is essential
that approvals be secured as soon as
possible.
Feb. 10: Chaperons for pre-Hop din-
ners and post-Hop breakfasts may be
the chaperon-in-residence or a quali-
fied married couple. Pre-Hop dinners
must end at the hour designated and
the fraternity closed to callers during
the hours of the J-Hop. (Exception:
Those fraternities housing women over-
night guests remain open during tthe
Hop and the chaperon-in-residence
must be at the house.) The house may
re-open for breakfast if desired at 2
a.m. Breakfasts must close in sufficient
time to allow women students to re-
turn to their residences by 4 a.m.
Fraternities occupied by women guests
must be closed to men promptly at 4
a.m. following the breakfast. No house
dances will be approved on this night
(Continued on Page 6)

41

'ROM its beginning the Republican Party
has blandly maintained at least two in-
ate inconsistencies which, regardless of their
ontributions to national growth in the past,
re now threatening national security.
A vigorous proponent of nationalism, the
epublican Party was founded in 1854 to op-
ose the extension of slavery. Its brand of
ationalism called for the preservation of the
rnion above all, especially as against section-
lism and secessionism.
With the help of a civil war, its program
revailed and, by concentrating the national
ttention on conscious growth, was largely re-
ponsible for establishing the conditions for
he successful beginnings of this country's
henomenal commercial progress.
As the nation grew, its significance in world
ffairs grew with it. Meanwhile, the Repub-
cans' nationalism, no longer needing its con-
olidating aims, found a new enemy in inter-
ationalism and fostered an isolationist policy
hat ignored the realities of changing world
olitical and economic situations.
The result was a damper on national growth,
hough not obvious. National growth was ir-
etrievably tied up with that of the rest of the
orld, a fact that Republicans refused even
o consider.
OWERFUL remnants of this outlook remain
in the Republican Party today, although the
'arty leader is an avowed internationalist. Nev-
rtheless, the nationalist, isolationist, short-
ighted segments of the Party are capable of
ccomplishing much damage to national se-
urity, which is undeniably, happily or un-
iappily, tied up with th'e security of the rest
f the world. As long as these segments re-
lain, there is real danger in granting the
republican Party a mandate, of which the
oter should be aware.
Where once the Party saw the value irk
nity, the very policy that it used to imple-'

ment that viewpqint is now being used for
disunity, at a time when the former is so
much more important to world safety than in
1860.
A specific application of that policy, the pro-
tective tariff, more clearly points up another
inconsistency that the Republican Party has
retained in its platform throughout its history.
A vigorous proponent of a laissez faire re-
lationship between business and government,
the Republican party has from the first been
opposed to government's interfering in busi-
ness to the latter's disadvantage. At first, there
was some validity in its contention that infant
business had to be left alone to flourish, and
that the nation needed flourishing businesses.
BUT with an amazingly straight face through
it all, the Party became not so much against
government's interference in business if it was
to the latter's benefit. It denied its own ar-
gument' by giving business more protection as
it became less an infant. Thus came the pro-
tective tariff that fitted snugly into the Party's
distaste for international affairs.
This attitude, too, has been maintained to
the present day, even despite legislation passed
during more progressive times when the Re-
publicans were out of office, legislation that
has become so nationally accepted that to
question it would be political suicide of the
quickest sort.
But it will still be political suicide for the
party of a slower type if voters wake up to the
Republican Party's inconsistencies which deny
the realities of today.
1) American business is quite capable of
handling itself profitably in world trade, and
2) there is much danger in isolating the Ameri-
can economy from the other world economies,
because they depend on us and we, in turn,
depend on them.
-JIM DYGERT, City Editor

*V

"M r

009Sr 'Fc*t ~ri461Vka ~v-
WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND:
Republican Meets Her Symbol
By DREW PEARSON

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
RSrIY OF MICHIG*
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MWUSIC
January 23 to Febm ay 7, 1S56
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the time
of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be etamined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instruc-
tor as to the time and place of his examination.

4,
.1

Let's Start New Year Right

INCE this is the time for making New Year's
resolutions, it might be wise for Student
overnment Council members to take part in
he annual tradition by resolving more regular
ttendance at Council meetings.
At the Council's last meeting before vaca-
on, President Berliner called adjournment
ith only 12 of the 18 voting members present.
hree of the absentees were ex-officios.
It is true that two of the absent voting
oting members were represented by substi-
ites on the body. These substitutes added
tle to the' discussion in the way of leadership
ad advice, the qualities for which ex-officio
.embers were included in the SGC concept.
Not only was the substitute for the absent
iterfraternity Council president unaware of
ouncil action and policy in the past, but he
emed to know little about several questions
rected to him concerning his own organiza-
on.
It seems useless for SGC to talk about "act-
Lg rJsponsibly" when meeting attendance
oes not justify acting at all, responsibly or
responsibly. When students choose their
presentatives, ex-officio or elected, they select
iem in the belief that they will exhibit maxi-

mum amount of interest in student govern-
ment. Attendance of only two-thirds of the
regular body can hardly be called a ;display
of maximum interest.
ASIDE from showing lack of responsibility
to the student body, absence from meetings
is also unfair to other members of the Council
who devote an evening of their tIne to meeting
in body.
Low attendance at the pre-vacation meeting
was particularly disheartening.
In line with the New Year tradition, noth-
ing could have provided a more stable stepping
stone for other Council resolutions than the
discussion which took place.
Though at times spaced with the usual pat-
on-the-back comments, the indirect evaluation
which SGC members made of themselves and
their organization was valuable, even though
not indicative of reason for student faith in
their campus government.
Whether the constructive criticism made at
this meeting or any other has any effect at
all will depend on more faithful attendance in
the new year.
--DICK SNYDER

A LOT of Congressmen are now
coming back from almost every
part of the world, most of them
traveling at the taxpayers' ex-
pense. But grandmotherly 70-
year-old Congresswoman Frances
Bolton of Cleveland has just fin-
ished a 20,000-mile trek through
dark Africa at her own expense.
Mrs. Bolton couldn't look less like
an African explorer, but her trip
had all the trappings of a Frank
Buck expedition.
In the Belgian Congo, a charg-
ing, trumpeting bull elephant al-
most put an end to her trip. Her
only injury, however, came not
from wild animals but from an
automobile -- a broken finger,
caught in a car door.
With her finger in splints, she
traveled by plane, steamer, rail-
way and caravan through 20 Af-
rican countries, colonies, and pro-
tectorates, for the House Foreign
Affairs Committee.
AS A REPUBLICAN, Mrs. Bol-
ton has had years of experience
with GOP elephants. But she ran
into the real animal on a dim
jungle trail. A big enraged bull
charged her party as if they were
all Democrats, They were mov-
ing through the Belgian Congo by
auto caravan when they found
themselves hemmed in on three
sides by elephants. Here is how
Mrs. Bolton describes the inci-
dent:
"We stopped to watch a large
herd of elephants where two bulls
were fighting. Soon an electrical
storm began to gather, andrthe
elephants became noticeably agi-
tated. Before we knew it, a sec-
ond herd had lumbered in on our
left and a third on our right."
"MOUNTAINS WERE around us
-a huge grassy plain, two cars,
elephants on three sides, nervous-
ly protecting their young, and rest-
less because of the lightning," re-
ported the Ohio grandmother. "The
" man at my side warned us to
watch an immense bull elephant
straight ahead. His ears were
flapping, his trunk swinging, and
he was shifting'from side to side.
"Suddenly, with front feet to-
gether and a curious trumpeting,
he charged us. The driver in the
lead car had no time to turn. He
slammed the gears into reverse and

ONE EXAM IN 4 YEARS:
Free University'
Means Just That

came back at us at about 30 miles
an hour. Our driver did not lose
his head, but backed clear of the
oncoming car, got us turned
around, and got us out of there.
It was a breathless few seconds."
. * *
BEFORE LEAVING the Belgian
Congo, Mrs. Bolton met another
woman politician - the Queen
Mother of the Watussi Tribe.

"We spoke of the vastness of
Africa and of the future which we,
as women, have in common al-
though we live across the world
from each other," writes the lady
legislator. "I offered her a very
small present, an attractive print-
ed cotton scarf. She took it with
great dignity and with a smile that
was mostly in her eyes."
(Copyright, 1955, by Bell Syndicate, Inc.)

REGULAR SCMEDULE
Time f Class Time of
(at 8, Friday, January
(at 9 Monday, Janua
(at 10 Wednesday, Jar,
(at f 1 Monday, Janua
Ay (at 12 Thursday, Febr
(at 1 Wednesday, Feb
(at 2 Thursday, Febr
(at 3 Wednesday, Fe
(at 4 Thursday, Febr

Ex.manaio
y27
ry 23
nuary 25
ary 30
uary 2
bruary 1
uary 2
bruary 1
uary 2

MONDA

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the sec-
ond article from University student
David Learned on a one-year exchange
program at the Free University of
Berlin.)
By DAVID LEARNED
BERLIN -- Writing from and
about the Free University of
Berlin is perhaps a fine thing, but
before this series runs any farther
an explanation of the university's
name 'so glibly used is in order,
and perhaps even overdue.
Any Michigan student could at
least intimate since the Free Uni-
versity lies in West Berlin that the
naming might have something to
do with a political sort of free-
dom, but it goes much more deep-
ly. The meaning comes from a
spirit of "academic freedom."
* * * ,
BUT WHAT is meant at the
Free University by academic free-
dom is a bit more comprehensive
than what it is commonly thought
to be at the University of Michi-
gan. Studying in an atmosphere
of academic freedom here is what
more tradition-hampered univer-
sities all over the world, with br
without their government support,
would deny their students.
When the students under a cer-
tain faculty here find that a pro-
fessor is incapable or even objec-
tionable, they can register a com-
plaint with their student govern-
ment and get action on it. If the
professor proves to be incompe-
tent as claimed, he can be relieved
of his position. If a student wishes
to skip a lecture or recitation be-

9-2
9-12
9-12
9-12
2<5
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12'
9412
2-5
2-5
2-5

TODAY AND TOMORROW:

HE speeches made last week in
the Soviet leaders are indeed v
n tone from their speeches six
'he difference is not mainly or r
oviet position on the biggest issu
appened at Geneva six months a
nyone in thinking that the S
etting ready to yield anything su
:e sake of an agreement. Mos
ncompromising in July as it isI
The difference between the sp
nd now lies elsewhere. It lies it
.dence, which is new and recen
oviets are winning the cold war
.frica, and that they have us, so
barrel. Bulganin and Khrus
>me back from India, Burma ar
an with an exuberantly happy
hat in the contest for influence
ley have' won, that they have co
illy to terms with the native f
he national sentiment of the key
outh Asia. It is because they fe
n this accqount, that they can af
roughly to us.
T WOULD be complacency inde
this all off as nothing more th
hev's usual bad manners. His
ere talk. Something serious ar
appened, and the Western allies1
offered an important setback.
iplomacy has achieved a notable s
an deceive only ourselves if we der

The Rough Talk
By WALTER LIPPMANN
Moscow by them will soon have, achieved their independ-
cry different ence.
months ago. The Russians have now broken through, more
eally in the accurately they have jumped over, the bar-'
es. Nothing riers which excluded them. For the first
go to justify time they have become a principal power in
oviets were the Middle East and in South Asia.
bstantial for
cow was as To MY mind a most significant thing about
today. these speeches is that they say so little
eeches then about economic matters and so much about
n their con- political matters. The Soviets are not offer-
it, that the ing to out-bid the West in the field of eco-
in Asia and nomic aid, that is to say of capital export.
to say, over They are for a little aid, not very much, one
hchev have might say just enough to establish the fact
nd Afghani- that the West is not the sole supplier of eco-
V conviction nomic aid.
and power, Their heavy cards are political, and what
me success- they are doing is to exploit the reaction to
eelings and our policy of military alliances. As we have
countries of backed Pakistan, they have backed India and
el so strong Afghanistan. As we back Thailand, they back
ford to talk Burma. As we back the so-called northern tier
with Iraq and Iran, they back the southern
tier with Egypt, Syria and Saudi-Arabia. By
ed to shrug making our military pacts with certain coun-
ta Khrush- tries, supposedly countries on "our side," we
talk is not have opened the door for the Russians into the
nd real has countries which are supposedly not on our side.
have in fact There is no reason, it seems to me, to hope
The Soviet that the rapid deterioration of the Western
uccess. We position can be arrested as long as there is a
ny or ignore cnntest in which we hack Turkev and Pakistan

cause the announced subject is not
of interest to him or perhaps be-
cause he is too hung over from the
night before, he merely sleeps right
through it.
And there are absolutely no re-
quired courses in any faculty.
Practically the only thing required
of a student here is that he pay
some of his tuition within a month
or so after the beginning of the
semester, and that he attend a
matriculation ceremony about a
month after that.
BUT THE most important as-
pect of this practically pure at-
mosphere of academic freedom is
this freedom of choice of classes.
Perhaps even too much stress has
been laid on it. But one can at
least partly explain it as a reaction
to what goes on a half mile over
the sector border in the Humboldt
University in East Berlin and in,
Universities in the Russian Zone.
There, two courses stand at the
top of the list of courses under
each faculty headingassrequired
courses. These are Russian and
"social science."
Social science is, as one might
guess, a course in Marxian doc-
trine. The students here don't
like at all being told what courses
to take.
At first glance one might think
that this freedom of choice offered
by a university is a utopian con-
cept in education. But not in
iberal arts education. One would
ind here that choice to that ex-
tent can be dangerous. Students
tend markedly here to choosing
strictly those courses that will
help them pass their monstrous
two to three months' test taken
after four years of untested school-
ing.
However there are arguments
that this situation is not so bad
or could with time be ameliorated.
One, the public school education
in Germany provides a fairly good
liberal education with its thirteen
main subjects.
And two, one could be tested for
general knowledge outside his
field, more than he is at present.
But right now, as far as I can
see, we in America with our re-
quired spread of courses are get-
tinga clearly superior liberal edu-
cation.
* * *
IT'S VERY interesting to be an
exchange student for a sear in

TUESDAY

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

i

English 1, 2
Economics 71
Psychology 253, 262
Sociology 1, 60
Spanish 1, 2, 21, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 11, 31
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 21, 31,
32, 61, 62
Russian 1
Psychology 31
Political Science 1
Chemistry 182, 183
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54,
101, 153
Chemistry 1, 3, SE, 20
Economics 72

Monday, January 23
Monday, January 23
Monday, January 23
Tuesday, January 24
Wednesday, January 25
Wednesday, January 25
Thursday, January 26
Thursday, January 26
Friday, January 27
Saturday, January 28
Saturday, January 28
Monday, January 30
Tuesday, January 31
Thursday, February 2

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2=5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
N
2-5
9-12

41

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Bus. Ad.
Bus. Ad.

Saturday, January 28
Tuesday, January 24
Thursday, January 26
Tuesday, January 31
Thursday, February 2
Monday, January 30
Tuesday, January 31

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIO
11 Monday, January 23
12 Thursday, February 2
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

English 11
Ch. - Met. 1, 107
C. E.22
E. M. 1
Drawing 1
Drawing 1x
C. E. 20
MI. - I. 136
Drawing 2, 3
M. - I. 135
E. M. 2

Monday, January 23
Tuesday, January 24
Tuesday, January 24
Tuesday, January 24
Thursday, January 26
Friday, January 27
Friday, January 27
Friday, January 27
Saturday, January 28
Saturday, January 28
Saturday, January 28

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

by Dick Bibier

. .--

'do

00

K

(~294
;i alit

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All eases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside Room 341 West Engineering Building
between December 14 and January 9 for instruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit
of the University. For time and place of examinations, see bul-
letin board in the School of Music.

,,

I"

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan