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December 16, 1955 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-12-16

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4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1955

=

POLITICS AND PEACE:
Year's Ten Leading Stories Named

..
"

*IIflrD'

E UNIVERSITY INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL HEALTH re-
ves the Certificate of Special Merit for Medical Television
neering. Left to right are: Dr. W. Hyland, of the American
dical Association, Dr. T. O. Mallery, director of the Institute,
I Dean Albert C. Furstenberg of the medical school.
PENSE TRAVEL:
- nstructor H. W. Schulke

(Continued from Page 1)
amazing Westerners with their
blundering joviality.
Another international story of
1955 focused the world's attention
on an old trouble spot - Formosa,
and drew that attention to the
once-insignificant islands of Que-
moy and the Matsus.
Communist China promised war.
Chiang, after a few retreats, de-
termined to hold firm to the little
islands - his last stepping stones
to the mainland. Congress resolved
to support whatever action the
President deemed necessary.
And suddenly if quietly, it was
all but forgotten.
War to Peace
The Communists relented' in
their attacks - supposedly on or-
ders from Moscow, though pos-
sibly in response to America's call-
ing their bluff, however hesitat-
ingly. And the world's attention
turned to Geneva and hopes of
peace.
A long-neglected pot boiled over
in Morrocco, and more than one
of the world's statesmen got his
fingers burnt because of it.
The first was Pierre Mendes-
France, France's most decisive en-
ergentic Premier within memory.
His government, which presented
"drastic alternatives" and got fast
results on European security and
Indo-Chinese peace, lost its ma-
jority on the seemingly-minor
problem of Morroccan reform.
As it turned out, Mendes-France
had offered France its last chance
to appease Morroccan nationalism,'
and bloodshed and rioting were the
inevitable outcome.
The new Premier, Edgar Faure,
did what he could to pacify both

nationalists and French colonials,
ended by satisfying no one and los-
ing his job.
With the French removal of the
puppet Sultan and restoration of
the popular ben Youseff, uneasy
peace prevailed again in Morrocco.
Britain's New Faces
In a year of changing faces,
Great Britain saw the close of two
long careers. Sir Winston Chur-
chill retired to a backbench in the
House of Commons, while Clement
Atlee resigned as Labor Party lead-
er and accepted an earldom and a
seat in the House of Lords.
Sir Anthony Eden, succeeding
Churchill, dissolved Parliament
and went to the country for a
mandate of his own. He got it,
and the Conservative majority in
Commons more than doubled.
The defeated Atlee, his health
failing, stepped, aside last week.
A three-man contest for party
leadership ended in victory for
young, moderate Hugh Gaitskell,
and the older Aneurin Bevan's dim
chances for eventual leadership
appeared to have gone out com-
pletely.
Always a tinder Dox, the Middle
Eastern situation giew hotter
when Russia made 4 deal to sell
arms to Egypt. Border conflicts
between Israel and her Arab neigh-
bors increased in frequency and
intensity.
Ike Gets Well
For the year's biggest story na-
tionally, the eyes of America and
the world turned to Denver, where
the President of the United States
was stricken with a coronary
thrombosis. Partisan differences
were forgotten as the nation
wished a "get well quick" to the
man they knew as "Ike."

By the year's end the President
is well on the road to recovery,
though not yet able to assume the
full burdens of office.
His illness cast serious doubts
on his running for re-election, de-
spite the frequency of Republican
public speculation that he well
might make the race.
Those doubts made another of
1955's biggest stories more inter-
esting.
The Presidential race, which
many thought would be open-and-
shut, is developing into a real
contest. The only avowed candi-
date for either nomination is still
Adlai Stevenson, though Sen. Estes
Kefauver's bid is expected soon,
and Averell Harriman is willing
if reluctant to do battle.
Republican hopefuls denied any
aspiration as long as the President
remained silent as to his plans,
but speculation centered around
Vice President Nixon, Chief Justice
Warren, Sen. William Knowland,
Massachusetts Gov. Christian Her-
ter, Milton Eisenhower, Califor-
nia's Governor Goodwin Knight,
and Under-Secretary of State Her-
bert Hoover, Jr., to name a few.
Salk Successful
Bound to be an issue in the
1956 campaign was a story that
had its origin in Ann Arbor when
the University's Dr. Thomas Fran-
cis told the world that Salk anti-
polio vaccine had proven a suc-
cess.
When some inoculated children
developed the disease, a furor
arose, and the issue became hope-
lessly entangled in politics. ,.The
government's testing and distri-
bution programs were hotly criti-
cized and defended.
Testing was made stricter, vac-
cine was made available again,
first in trickles and then in flows,
and a less-enthusiastic but grate-
ful public had its young children
scratched and immunized.
The end of t'he fearsome crippler
was plainly in sight.
American Labor consolidated in
1955 and promised to be a more
potent force than ever on the na-
tional scene. Mending a 20-year
schism, the American Federation
of Labor and the Congress, of In-
dustrial Organizations merged
their 15 million membership and
political power.
Under the leadership of the old
AFL's George Meany, organized
labor will speak with a clearer and
perhaps louder voice than ever in
its history.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
FOR SALE
MOVING
Westinghouse washer and dryer, like
new. Metal cabinet sink. 9x12 Wil-
ton rug. Child's desk. Misc. articles.
Phone NO 3-0846 after 6 P.M. )103B
SEA HORSES ... only 75c. Open to 8
P.M. thru Dec. 23. University Aquar-
ium, 328 E. Liberty. NO 3-0224. )102B
SIZE 38 Man's McGregor coat. Sheeps-
wool and plaid cloth lining. Large
Lambs wool collar. Worn dozen times.
Looks like new. Cost new about $70.00.
Sell for $30.00. NO 3-5958 after 5:00
P.M. only. )97B
SIAMESE KITTENS for sale, Siamese
cat stud service. NO 2-9020. )87B
MEISSNER FMAM Hi-Fi tuner and am-
plifier; Webster Chicago 3-speed
changer, G.E. V. R. Cartage; G. E.
Speaker $175. Phone NO 3-2249. )B54
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88; Sox,
39c; Shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )4B
STUDENT ROOM
RUG SPECIAL
9x12 cottons, all colors, priced
- on sale now at $29.95
SMITH'S CARPET STORE
207 E. Washington NO 3-5536
)5B
COOKED and cleaned select cocktail
shrimp for the party, get-togethers at
Washington Fish Market, 208 E. Wgsh-
ington, NO 2-2589. Free delivery. )3B
ROOMS FOR RENT
FOR WOMAN-Room for rent-on bus
line. Garage space. 718 Soule blvd. )6D
FOR RENT
OPPORTUNITY to live near campus
with young family for girl who will
help evenings. Private room. Phone
NO 2-7040. )19H
SUITE ROOMS for men (3 or 4) stu-
dents. Cooking privileges, % block
from campus. 417 E. Liberty. )28C
HELP WANTED
WANTED-cab drivers. Full or part
time. Apply 113 S. Ashley, Ann Arbor.
Yellow and Checker Cab Company,
phone NO 8-9382. )6H
WANTED - Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Excellent salary. Morning de-
livery, no collecting. Call NO 2-3241.
)29H

USED CARS
'35 FORD, rebuilt motor. R&H and
Spot. $60. Call NO 3-8154 evenings.
)SON
1950 BUICK SPECIAL-2 door, one own-
er car. University Oldsmobile, 907 N.
Main, NO 3-0507. )95N
51 Ford-radio, heater, overdrive $350.
49 Ford coupe $195. "You get a bet-
ter deal" at Fitzgerald Inc. 3345
Washtenaw, NO 3-4197. )93N
1950 PLYMOUTH. 4 door, radio, heater.
New tires. In good ,condition, $195.
Jim White Chevrolet, 222 W. Wash-
ington, NO 2-4588. )91N
'41 FORD $40. University Oldsmobile,
907 N. Main, NO 3-0507. )92N
1948 CHEVROLET, 2 door. Black, radio
and heater, Perfect transportation.
$145. Jim White Chevrolet, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588.
1951 FORD club coupe. Radio, heater,
Fordomatic. $495. Jim White Chevro-
let, 222 W. Washington. )89N
'50 PLYMOUTH Stationwagon, heater,
turn signals. Very nice shape. $445.
University Oldsmobile, 907 N. Main,
NO 3-0507. 185N
'50 PLYMOUTH-2 door sedan, real nice
car. $345. University Oldsmobile, 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507. )86N
TRANSPORTATION SPECIALS -- 1951
Hillman Convertible $395; 1951 Henry
J. $295; Both cars exc. cond. 25-35 mi.
per gal. Sport Cars-Ypsilanti. )3N
1950 FORD V-8 2-door in excellent
shape. $395. University Oldsmobile. 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507 or 2-9626. )72N
'49 OLDS, Super 8$, creamconvertible.
Red leather seats, hydramatic, ra-
dio, heater, new top, white walls.
$350. Call after 6:30. NO 3-1279. )19N
PERSONAL
THERE'S STILL TIME to get our line
for last minute Xmas gifts. Student
Periodical Agency, NO 2-3061, days,
eves. )73F
FOREIGN STUDENTS -Improve your
English during the vacation. Con-
versation and lessons by experienced
teacher. Call NO 2-0325. )72F
VISIT the little shop of Antiques for
Christmas gifts of distinction. Jane
E. Peterson, 1509 Montclair P1. NO 3-
2862. )70F
SAY HAPPY BIRTHDAY the different
way. Send friendly greetings to
friends by advertising in the MICH-
IGAN DAILY CLASSIFIED Section.

BUSINESS SERVICES
RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewomen. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Acrade.
)4J
HI-Fl
Components and Service Audio-
phmile, net prices. Telefunken Hi-
F1, AM-FM shortwave radios. Serv-
ice on all makes of radios and pho-
nographs. Ann Arbor Radio and TV,
1217 S. University. Phone NO 8-7942.
1% blocks east of East Eng. )1J
RICHARD MADDY-VIOLINMAKER
Fine, old certified instruments and
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )2J
WASHINGS-Also ironings privately.
Specializing in cotton dresses. Free
pick up and delivery. Phone NO 2-
9020. )9J
TYPING, Fast accurate work done on
electric typewriter. Past experience-
with printers firm, Experienced In
dissertations, term papers, etc. Call
NO 2-7605. )F57
SERVICE SHOP, 1217 S.A. Studio. 131V7
S. Univ. )1J
TRANSPORTATION
DRIVE LATE MODEL CARS to Port-
land, Seattle, and Yakima, Washing-
ton. All expenses paid. C&G Motor
Sales. 11414 Livernois, Detroit. WE-
3-2365. 129G
Drive a new car to
Florida-California
Seattle, Denver, Sheveport, La.
Gas paid. No waiting.
2465 Grand River
Detroit, Mich. (downtown)
Call Woodward 1-3990
)21G

Y

'I

4

By JIM BOW

rm-making has attracted the
est of several groups on the
ersity campus.
)t only have groups such as the
ic Film Society been interest-
a film-making, but also mdi-
als have studied and even
uced movies.
e of these individuals is Harry
chulke, instructor in the Col-
of Architecture and Design.
everal years Schulke has been
ng documentary films.
Two Films Complete.,
e settings in these films have
ed from a Cleveland streetcar
is first picture to an Amish
oom schoolhouse in his most
it film. Schulke has completed
films and is in the process of
king two more.
hulke's first picture is entitled
'etcar," and is a study of
le and their reflected charac-
and interests as they are trav-
to and from work. "Street-
won first prize in the art
classification at the Midwest
Festival in 1953, and won
additional honor by being
,n at the Edinburgh Festival
fall.
e second 'film, produced by
Ike' and Jasper Wood of
land, entitled "Kenny King's,"
name of a Cleveland ham-
er haven. ,Again, the subject
e movie was people. In this
the people, mainly young

hoodlums, were photographed as
they ate, danced and made love at
Kenny King's. The purpose of this
film was to show how these young
people were prototypes of their
cinema counterparts.
Parts Have Had TV Showing
The last two films, which are
still in the process of production,
were done by Schulke alone after
he had moved to Ann Arbor. Parts
of these films were shown over
WPAG-TV Monday, Dec. 5.
The scene of the other recent
movie is an Amish one-room
schoolhouse in Salt Creek, Ohio.
This picture illustrates the situa-
tion which a teacher faces in this
school. Not only must the teacher
handle eight grades, but he must
also teach the children English,
for the language of the Amish in
this district is German.
Film production is used by
Schulke in instructing his begin-
ning design classes. Some of his
classes have produced experimen-
tal movies which have been shown
by the Gothic Film Society in the
Rackham Building.
"Expense, the only drawback,
really doesn't make a great deal of
difference," Schulke says. "The
challenge is great-the medium
,may be too big for me. I am more
at a loss with it than at grips with
it to date. However, at times I can
project what I want through it.
For me film and photography are
the media with the widest and
deepest potentialities."

University Television Studios
Activity Climbs Toward Peak

The big day is approaching fast
for the majority of University stu-
dents, but it's already arrived at
315_ Manard, the studios of Uni-
versity Television.
Beginning this noon, activity on
the part of the speech depart-
ment will reach a frenzied peak
during final rehearsals of the
yuletide TV presentation, "Christ-
mas Studio Sampler."
Fir trees, sleigh bells, red flan-
nel, and an overwhelming crew
of elves are entangled in miles of
cable and baked by a skyful of
man-made suns in the form of
Klieg lights.
Tonight's telecast, the longest
live show ever attempted by Uni-
versity Television, and one of the
longest productions in the history
of the speech department, will be-
gin at 7:30 p.m. on WPAG-TV,
Channel 20, replacing "Studio
Sampler" and "Sports Parade."
An intricate toy town, designed

by Joan' Flemming, is the means
by which transitions between the
three major segments are effected.
The first, "The Tree," is a re-
peat of last year's successful and
original performance. Author Joe
Coleman tells of the spirit of
Christmas on a Christmas tree lot.
Next, a children's fantasy, "The
nicest Christmas Gift of All," pre-
sents a sad Santa faced with the
dismal prospect of distributing
three decks of Old Maid cards and
a blind Teddy bear among several
million of the world's smaller set.
The last portion of the program
features, "Yes, Virginia, there is
a Santa Claus," familiar to most
Yuletide audiences.
"Christmas Sampler," an all stu-
dent production, includes a staff
of seventy technicians and actors,
and a selected thirty voice choir
from the University High School,
directed by Francis McKowan.

Read
Daily
Classifieds

)f54
f

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING-Manuscripts, Thesis, Disser-
tations, etc. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Phone NO 2-5336. )18J

eNOW! gg t
MTa .

Infornation
NO 2-3136

- -- - rl

4

RAMAuC
Aft"
CENTER

Moliere's
"THE PHYSICIAN
IN SPITE
"OF HIMSELF"
and
"NRITYA DARPAN"
A pageant of dance of India
LAST WEEK
TONIGHT at 8:15
Performances through Saturday
Matinee Sunday at 2:30

That's the Life
of Luke Fargo!

ROWDY!
ROUSYY
ROLLICKING!

. e r e c e ev I

REFLUT
tops his r
"Shane'! and 1
"Battle Cwy"-
roles!
TECHNICdOR a:tamnciu

..TH E TAST E

Is

G~ AT 10

Admission $1.65

Students 99cI

TE ACTIVATED"~

DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
327 So. Fourth Ave. (Masonic Temple)
Box office open daily 10-5 Tel. NO 2-5915

STARTING SUNDAY

j

,,5

*
*
SENIORS
Are you interested in Detroit as a work area?
*k

I 1

LAST
TIMES
TODAY !

I Liberace
WARNERCOLOR

NO 2-2513
with
Joanne I
Dru

Dorothy
Malone

I

* STARTING SATURDAY. e
Santa Comes Early This Year Bringing
Joyous Holiday Entertainment For All!

*
*
*
*
*
*
* N

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS
CIVIL ENGINEERS

J

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the only filter cigarette with a genuine cork tip.
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* SCIENCE MAJORS
career opportunities in
or write -

A

For
call

the utility field,

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Operations Staff Department

..................: a

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