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December 10, 1955 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-12-10

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Sixty-Sixth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICH. * Phone NO 2-3241
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only. This must be noted in all reprints.

"Would You Say You Believe In Moderation
In Running For The Nomination?'

To The Editor

,I

'URDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1955

NIGHT EDITOR: GAIL GOLDSTEIN

Turmoil Over UN Admissions
Indicates Future Logrolling

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More on OSU Game .. .
To the Editor:
IT'S time we put the brakes on
this growing hysteria that start-
ed Nov. 19. On that day Ohio
State knocked us out of the Rose
Bowl, and- since then this Uni-
versity has made a great effort
to see that neither Michigan nor
any other Big Ten team ever plays
in the Rose Bowl again.
Up until this year Michigan had
been pro-Rose Bowl. What caused
the big switch in attitude? Answer:
that already much over-publicized
fracas at the end of the Ohio
State game.
The official University opinion
on that affair seems to be:
1. The incident was such a ter-
rible disgrace to this great Uni-
versity that the entire nation will
be talking' about it for years to
come.
2. The sole cause of the incfdent
was our disappointment over our
failure to get the Rose Bowl bid.
3. All future thoughts of bowl

games must therefore be aban-
doned lest this great catastrophe
be repeated.
I disagree violently with this at-
titude. First of all, this school has
a very inflated idea of its own
importance . . . I have learned
that the rest of the nation was
never aware of our great reputa-
tion for sportsmanship, and is of
the opinion that the incident could
have been described simply as
"Michigan fell apart. at the end
of the game" and then forgotten.
Secondly, it just isn't so that
"now everything points to the
coveted bid to the bowl." Ohio
State, without the bowl incentive,
romped to the Big Ten champion-
ship and was downright overjoyed
about, it. In other words, the
"Ohio State incident" could Just
as well have taken place if the
Rose Bowl had not been involved
at all.
Let's cool off for a while before
we throw the Rose Bowl away.
-Charles Carroll, '56

THE RECENT turmoil over application of 18
new countries for membership in the United
Nations is an indication that future progress in
the world organization will be a matter of
logrolling.
In order to obtain membership in the UlN, a
country must get a recommendation from the
Security Council and then receive a two-thirds
vote of approval in the General Assembly as the
final requirement for admission. This system
allows a cross-check on each nation from many
angles.
But the "package deal" plan is a means, of
less effective politicking. By admitting some
countries who are not favorably inclined to one
trend of thinking as well as admitting members
of an opposite trend of thoughts, the UN will
evolve into a "war game" with sides chosen to
stand for policy,
The 13 non-Communist applicants-Ceylon,
Cambodia, Japan, Laos, Libya, Nepal, Jordan,
Italy, Portugal, Spain, Ireland, Austria and
Finland-are favored for admission only be-
cause the Communist countries are so eager to
get Albania, Romania, Bulgaria, Outer Mon-
golia and Hungary into the organization.
1I__E DEAL was not proposed or received
enthusiastically by anyone. It was more a
matter of doing the easiest thing in the shortest
period of time. This is a shabby way of reflect-
ing principle or even support of a political
position. But there are advantages to swallow-
ing the Communist's bitter pill.
The simplest advantage is that although five
Communist countries will be admitted, 13 non-
Communist countries will reinforce the Western
bloc. In the Balkan and Byzantine area, four
Communist countries against six non-Com-
munist countries are up for admission.
A further strengthening in the Near and
Far East of the non-Communist group will be
accomplished. It is worthwhile to takeOuter

Mongolia, a land with camels and no govern-
ment as such, in return for a 'country whose
friendship we need-Japan.
The uppermost question in most people's,
minds is the position that Nationalist China
will take. What will she do? A veto by any
one of the five permanent Council members
(Nationalist China, United States, France,
Great Britain and the Soviet Union) could
complicate matters and kill an application for
membership.
The United States will probably accept the
applications. It is the expedient thing to do.
The Soviet Union has said it will accept all 18
states or none, which hints at China that a veto
will not be favorably received by the Big Bear.
France and Great Britain will probably go along
with the United States.
DR. T. F. TSIANG, UN representative of
Nationalist China will probably try to block
the application of Outer Mongolia by any
means at hand. He says that they invaded his
country and joined against United Nations
troops in Korea.
Dr. Tsiang is in a touchy position. His clear
course must be with the West or as an isola-
tionist. The latter course is a lonely one for a
nation whose last life is on Formosa.
To be with the West and vote for Outer
Mongolia would dissuade a suggestion of re-
placing Nationalist China with Red China in
the world organization.
The Security Council meets this morning to
consider the applications. In the continuing
tug-of-war between East and West, a strong
stand for unity must be voiced on both sides.
A solution must be found to the evidently dis-
parate views of Soviet Russia and Nationalist
China. In any case, it is important that the
West keep the logrolling to a minimum, or at
least to its advantage.
-DAVID KAPLAN, Feature Editor

10

,.

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
UtWVEBSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGEOF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
JaIs ay 23 to February 2, 19#6
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the time
of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instruc-
tor as to the time and place of his examination.
Tt aEGUTAR SCHEDULE
Time of Class Time of Exavnsution

ibr9 t~r~i wrswu , 'csy el

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,

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND:
te ouse Whout I
By DREW PEARSON

Justifiable Demand?

0.

THE CURRENT Detroit newspaper strike has
provoked a torrent of criticism against the
striking stereotypers' union.. The union's posi-
tion has been given little attention since the
strike began.
The very nature of the strike prevents full
coverage in that it closed all the major Detroit
papers.
According to the stereotypers' union, the pur-
pose of the strike is to reduce the extreme
pressure of the work.
George Robinson, the union president, ex-

plained, "We are requesting that- the work be,
done outside regular shift hours at a minimum
of overtime to relieve the excessive work load."
Robinson denied reports that the union de-
mands higher wages or a special crew totiandle
color work.
The stereotypers feel they are being over-
worked-that they are doing 10 or 12 hours'
work in eight. This is a question which the
publishers should consider seriously, regardless
of whether the union's entire position is justi-
'ied.
--'TED FRIEDMAN

I

ri.

IN THIS CORNER:

Learning to be Practical
By MURRY FRYMER

N1 ITH all the charges and counter-charges
circulating throughout the political world
these days, the campus polititcal clubs are
rather conspicuous in their silence.
Except for the noisy Arab-Israeli debate
sponsored earlier in the semester by the Young
Democrats, both groups have confined most of
their activity to an occasional lecture from a
University professor.
This, of course, is the wisest thing to do--
politically speaking. With the numerable hats
in the ring, a political club that comes out in
favor of one particular hopeful today may have
to eat its words when the conventions select
party leaders next summer.
Then, also, it is always best to hear the
particular platform the - party will choose to
take before crusading for your own views,
which may be too radical. or too conservative.
As any politician will tell you, this is the key
to success. A party united is, strong, and so on.
WE HAVE no reason to doubt the logic of this
political reasoning. But it would seem that
politics is more than the science of winning
elections.
If college groups which can harmlessly and
profitably devote time to conflicting ideas
decide to abandon them then what is the
Editorial Staff
Dave Bjad ........................... Managing Editor
Jim Dygert .....,.........City Editor
Murry 'Frymer.................. Editorial Director
Debra Durchslag ..................... Magazine Editor
David Kaplan .......................... Feature Editor
Jane Howard ......................... Associate Editor
Louise Tyor ........................-Associate Editor
Phil Douglis. .............. ...... . Sports Editor
Alan Eisenberg .............. Associate Sports Editor
Jack Horwits ................. Associate Sports Editor
Mary Helithaler ................ .... Women's Editor
Elaine Edmonds.............Associate Women's Editor
John- Hirtzel..............:.....Chief Photographer
Business Staff

purpose of their existence? Whatever support
they can lend to the party cause is somewhat
negligible, and although they offer experience,
members could find plenty of time for that
after college.
Yet this "realism instead of idealism" atti-
tude seems to have been adopted by the local
groups. Candidates are discussed on the terms
of "Can he win?" instead of "Is he the best
man?"
One campus political group, the Student
League for Industrial Democracy, has been
completely disbanded mainly on the grounds-
that all they can do is sit around and discuss
ideas that probably won't be adopted by either
major party in the immediate future.
This is all unfortunate. Admittedly the
idealist is not having his day in today's very
practical political scene. And, admittedly the
general tone of the nation is rather conserva-
tive.
But if young people begin rejecting ideas,
where in the political world will they come
from?
UNFORTUNATELY TOO much emphasis is
placed too soon on emulating professional-.
ism. The college student is taught to accept
party conflicts and hatreds as well as the rules
of political expediency as part of the game. He
learns to rationalize various corrupt practices
as part of an "ends justify the means" philos-
ophy.
And somewhere along the line the student is
convinced that the common belief of "telling
the people what they want to hear" is in all
cases the wisest political maneuver.
Maybe it is. But what a party says and what
a party does may have to vary a great deal.
If all concentration is on "winning" then
when the new ideas become necessities they
won't be available for action.
Even if today's atmosphere is not inviting,
the formulation and promotion of new ideas
must continue. Yesterday's crackpot scheme is
in many cases today's legislation. But with the
professional realism and practicality of our

THE Geneva spirit may be going
to heck in a hand-basket; war
may be threatening in the Near
East; and Secretary Dulles may
rival "Foot-in-Mouth" Charley
Wilson when it comes to saying
the wrong thing at the wrong
time. But at least one thing is
better as a result of Ike's illness:
The squirrels are having a won-
derful time on the White House
lawn.
All you have to do is go down to
the White House and look at
them. They're scampering every-
where. They're so bold and braz-
en it almost seems they've read
the papers and know the boss is
in Gettysburg.
* . a.
WHITE HOUSE guards won't
say anything about it. Usually
they are expansive and loquacious.
They lead kind of a lonesome life
standing around the White House
in little guardhouses, and usually
like to talk to people. But when
it comes to squirrels - well, they
are polite, but as tight-lipped as
the Washington monument.
White House gardeners have the
putting green behind the White
House i nexcellenthshape now,
waiting the day when the na-
tion's No. 1 golfer returns. And
somehow or other the squirrels
haven't molested it. Maybe they
learned their lesson. Or maybe
the explanation of White House
Assistant Press Secretary Murray
Snyder is the answer. Murray
was approached on this subject.
After all, he's paid to talk.
"We studied their habits and
found there were only four squir-
rels causing the damage," he ex-
plained. Perhaps the inference
was that the squirrels were Demo-
crats. Anyway, they were trans-
ferred elsewhere.
Anyway, while Ike's away, the,
squirrels that remain are having
a wonderful time.
* * *
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
Charley Wilson, once head of Gen-
eral Motors, wasn't a bit unhappy
over the Senate predicament of
the man who succeeded him, Har-
low Curtice. Perhaps Charley re-
membered how glad Curtice was
to have Charley get out. Several
months ago, Curtice had refused
to attend Senate hearings unless
subpoenaed. He got the subpoena
and the results have been interest-

ing. The five-year contract hasti-
ly given General Motors dealers
was a victory for Frederick J. Bell,
Executive Vice President of the
National Auto Dealers Association,
who has been working for better
protection between dealers and all
motor manufacturers.
* * *
SEN. OLIN JOHNSTON of South
Carolina, a conscientious but
sometimes naive solon, certainly
seems to have fallen for the Ger-
man property lobby. He's been
holding hearings on the return of
alien property and look who he's
had as attorneys for his commit-
tee!
Attorney No. 1 sis Harlan Wood,
who found it expedient to retire
from the D.C. draft board in 1942
after he was arrested for drunken
driving in an accident that in-
jured a pedestrian. He was ac-
quitted, but later fired a .38 calibre
bullet over the head of a law
client, Dale Birdsell. The case
was dismissed April 6, 1949, when
Wood claimed it was a joke.
Attorney No. 2 is Le Roy In.-
goldsby, who also serve das at-
torney for Fritz von Opel, the fa-
mous German industrialist who is

trying to get his Ubersee Com-
pany returned. This company,
seized by the U.S. government
during the war, operates the Har-
vard Brewing Company and the
spur filling stations in Kentucky.
INGOLSBY, who will get paid
in full if and when von Opel gets
his property back, can hardly be
considered an ubiased attorney,
in acting for a Senate committee
supposed to conduct an impar-
tial probe into German property.
Olin's explanation is that Sena-
tor Dirksen, Illinois Republican,
asked him to hir6 Ingolsby. This
makes it worse. For Dirksen is.
one of the, best friends of the
German lobby. And under the
Republicans, Dirksen employed as
counsel John W. Nairn, who shared
offices with Ray Jenkins, attorney
for Interhandel whose property
was also seized. It's funny how
the German lobby seems to get
around.
Note - A big German industrial-
ist visiting Washington the other
day, called Chancellor Adenauer
a fuddy-duddy and said German
business was only waiting for him
to get out of the picture to have
Germany team up with Russia.
(Copyright, 1955, by Bell Syndicate, Inc.)

M NDAY
TUESDAY

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8
9
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11
12
1
2
3
4
8
9
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11
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SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

English 1, 2
Economics 71
Psychology 253, 262
Sociology 1, 60
Spanish 1, 2, 21, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 11, 31
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 21, 31,
32, 61, 62
Russian 1
Psychology 31 f
Political Science 1
Chemistry 182, 183
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54,
101, 153
Chemistry 1, 3, 5E, 20
Economics72

Monday, January 23
Monday, January 23
Monday, January 23
Tuesday, January 24
Wednesday, January 25
Wednesday, January 25
Thursday, January 26
Thursday, January 26
Friday, January 27
Saturday, January 28
Saturday, January 28
Monday, January 30
Tuesday, January 31
"Thursday, February 2

AT THE ORPHEUM:
Temptress' Explores
Meanings of Truth

Friday, January 27
Monday, January 23
Wednesday, January 25
Monday, January 30
Thursday, February 2
Wednesday, February 1
Thursday, February 2
Wednesday, February 1
Thursday, February 2
Saturday, January 28
Tuesday, January 24
Thursday, January 26
Tuesday, January 31
Thursday, Febriary 2
Monday, January 30
Tuesday, January 31

9-12
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2-5
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9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5

2-5
2-5
4-5
,2-5
2-5
2-5
2x5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
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2-5
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2-5

AT THE be'ginning of "The
Temptress," the narrator in-
forms the movie-goer that there
are two kinds of truth: the truth
of the facts and the truth of the
heart.
Then he goes about proving it in
an entertaining, if somewhat am-
biguous manner.
The scene is laid in a courtroom,
where Lut (Michael Simon) is be-
ing tried for the murder of 17-
year-old Marie Louise (Anna Maria
Ferrereo). The story of their pas-
sion is told in a series of flash-
backs, first by the prosecution,.
then by the defense.
The prosecution contends that
Lut was a dissolute, evil young
man who first led innocent young
Marie Louise down the primrose
path, then killed her when she left
him. Almost all the facts fit with
this interpretation of events.
However, the defense's view is

that Marie Louise was a prostitute
who ensnared unsuspecting and
trustful Lut with her more obvious
charms, and then died in an acci-
dent. The facts also fit this inter-
pretation.
* * *
AND AT THE end of "The
Temptress," the audience is left
musing on the moral ambiguity of
man, the impersonal functioning
of the law, and MisshFerrero.
It is unfortunate that all Italian
actresses resemble either Gina
Lollabridgida or Pier Angeli. Miss
Ferrero is the Pier-type, so it is
definitely to her credit that she
manages Marie-Louise-the-devil
quite as well as Marie-Louise-the-
angel. As the good Marie Louise,
she has a wistful air of haunting
innocence that illumines her drab
surroundings with the, glowing
purity of young love. As the bad
Marie Louise, she lights up the
same surroundings with honky-
tonk neon, too much makeup and
a genuine liking for her profes-
sion.
Simon carries off his dual role
with equal aplomb. He is as con-
vincing with a cigarette in his
mouth as he is with cocker-spaniel
devotion in his eyes.
Special plaudits should go to
Michel Auclair, nothing short of

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Bus. Ad. 11 Monday, January 23
Bus. Ad. 12 Thursday, February 2

OOLLE
Eaglish 11
Ch. - Met. 1, 107
C. E. 22
E. M.1
Drawing 1
Drawing Ix
C. E. 20
M. - I. 136
Drawing 2, 3
M - I. 135
E. M. 2

GE OF ENGINEERING
Monday, January 23
Tuesday, January 24
Tuesday, January 24
Tuesday, January 24
Thursday, January 26
Friday, January 27
Friday, January 27
Friday, January 27
Saturday, January 28
Saturday, January 28
Saturday, January 28

K

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
_COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside Room 301 West Engineering Buiding
between December 14 and January 9 for instruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit
of the University. For time and place of examinations, see bul-
loin hm,. in the School of Music

z

'k f

THE Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan

sented at 8:00 p.m. today in the Lydia
Mendelssonn Theatre, auspices of the
Department of Speech.

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