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December 07, 1955 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAtZPI

TIlE MiCHiGAN DAILY

rVA 1iAU'

Baseball's W
The'Flying Dutchman'
Rated Greatest Shortstop

agner

Dies;

'Frisco

r.

Don's Head
For Tough
Opponents

Tops APCage Poll
p f ilie...
NEWT LOKEN

By DONNA WILLS

Baseball has lost the greatest
shortstop of all time.
John Peter (Honus) Wagner of
the Pittsburgh Pirates is dead.
"Old Jay," as he was lovingly
called by his friends, passed away
at 12:56 a.m. today at his home,
at the age of 81. His wife, Bessie
and other members of his family
were present at his bedside.
In ailing health in recent years,
his last public appearance was at
the unvailing of an 18 foot, 40
ton bronze statue erected in his
honor at Forbes Field.
Born on February 24, 1874 in
Mansfield (now Carnegie), Pa. of
German parents, "Old Bowlegs"
began baseball at the age of 15
in 1889, the year of the Johns-
town flood. He had already been
making his own way for three
years by working in the coal mines
of Pennsylvania.
Discovered by Barrow
Discovered by Ed Barrow, of the
Yankees, Wagner went on to be-
come, according to John McGraw,
"the greatest baseball player of
all time." He became known as the
"Flying Dutchman" of the Pitts-
burgh Pirates, and under Fred
(Cap) Clarke, had his best years
in America's favorite sport.
He helped the Buccaneers gain
the National League pennant in
1901, 1902, 1903 and again in 1909.
He played in the first modern
World Series in 1903, when the
Pirates played the Boston Red
Sox. The Red Sox won the series
which ran for eight games.
Wagner whose favorite expres-
sion was "how about that," loved
to tell stories of the good old days
of baseball to anyone who would
listen. This was one of his favorite
pastimes while "taking charge" of
the ball bag in the Pirates dugout
in his later years.
His favorite home run was also
one of the longest as he liked to
tell it. The ball landed in the coal
car of a passing freight train and
wasn't found until 500 miles away
at the train's destination.

One of the first to be admitted
to Baseball's Hall of Fame at Coop-
erstown, N. Y., Wagner's name is
spoken by the fans along with
two other greats of baseball-Ty
Cobb (Georgia Peach) and Babe
Ruth.._
Batting .300 or over for 17 con-
secutive seasons, he led the league
batters eight times. During his 21
years in the Majors (17 of which
were in this century) he had a
lifetime batting average of .329.
He led once in home runs, seven
times in doubles and three times
in triples. He had a total of 651
doubles, 252 triples and twice led
in the runs-batted-in department.
At the age of 34 he stole 61 bases
and followed with 50 or more for
five consecutive years.
His fielding average was .946 and
he played every position on the
team. He was said never to have
made a wrong play or to have
thrown to a wrong base.
Tried Managing
The Flying Dutchman even had
a crack at managing the club. In
1917 he took over when Jim Calla-
han quit. But he gave this up be-
cause he didn't like "bossing the
players."
He quit baseball at the age of
43 after playing in 100 or more
games per season for 19 years. He
then went into the sporting goods
business but left that after 16
years and returned to baseball as
a coach for Pittsburgh.
Wagner's record seems even
more astounding when you realize
that he hit against the dead ball,
spit ball, emery, shine and other
tricks of the trade in the bygone
days.
Regardless of his frequent rem-
iniscing of the old time game,
Wagner perferred the baseball of
today, when the foul-mouthed, un-
educated player was a thing of
the past.
The Flying Dutchman of Pitts-
burgh is gone from the baseball
scene today, but his memory will
live on in the hearts of both the
baseball players and the baseball
fans everywhere.

By JOHN LaSAGE

By The Associated Press As you enter the I-M Building,
turn left and walk to the gymnast-
The University of San Francisco ic's room, you're usually greeted
was voted the Number One college by the sight of a smiling, black-
team in the first Associated Press haired gentleman directing the
nationwide poll of the new season. activities of several well-muscled
The team will have a good chance athletes.
to prove the point against top- This gentleman, Newton C.
flight opposition before the month oken, ishstarting his ninth sea-
son as the guiding light of the
of December eneds. Michigan gymnastics squad.
Coach Phil Woolpert's Dons are One would have to go a long
ready to embark on a swing into way .to find a more friendly, co-
the Midwest, South and East that operative person. Loken always
will just about tell whether the finds time to give out information
Number One team of last season to both athletes and spectators.
is likely to make it stick again. To the boys on the team, Coach
The nation's sports writers and Loken seems "just like one of
sportscasters gave the Dons 63 them." Newt, as the gymnasts call
first place votes of 110 cast. On him, will go through various man-
the basis of 10 points for first, euvers in explaining gymnastic
nine for second, etc., San Francis- techniques to his athletes. Loken
co piled up 1,023 points to lead is just as deft and agile as he was
Kentucky, with seven firsts and in his undergraduate days at
847 points. Minnesota. In fact, the amiable
NCAA Champs coach has a record which would
San Francisco.winnerofthemake any gymnast jealous.

a great deal to gymnastics and
tumbling. He has written over a
dozen articles on the sport and
has published three books.
Prominent Phys. Ed. Leader
Loken has also been a promi-
nent physical education leader,
serving as secretary, treasurer,
membership secretary and Vice
President of the Michigan Assoc-
iation for Health, Physical Edu-
cation and Recreation at one time
or another.
In regard to this year's team,
Loken recalls a pictrue taken
earlier in the year, showing him
with a very worried expression on
his face. "I guess I should be
worried this early in the season,"
says Loken, "but I've got some
really sensational boys."
The Wolverine's first contest
will be the Midwest Open Meet
at Chicago's Navy Pier this Satur-
day. The Wolverine mentor con-
fides, "I hope I'll be able to bring
back some good news from that
one. We're still not going at too
fast a- pace but the boys seem to
be coming along fine."

MICHIGAN BASKETBALL CAPTAIN Tom Jorgensen is starting
his third year on the varsity. Noted for his hustle and quick
thinking on the court, Jorgensen overcomes very well the detri-
ment of a bad left leg.
TM' pi'qfde..
TOM JORGENSEN

NEWT LOKEN
.. . smiling gentleman

Kappa and Sigma Delta Psi and
being elected into an honorary
education fraternity.
Since coming to Michigan, the
congenial coach has contributed

By PETE KASS

"Set it up," "Nice shot, Krame"
and "Let's move it" are phrases
often heard at basketball practices
when Captain Tom Jorgensen is
on the court.
Jorgensen's performance during
the past two seasons has been a
bright spot in an otherwise bleak
record. He was second high scorer
last year with an average of over
15 points and gave a good example
of hustling play.
Probably the first thing noticed
about the Wolverine captain is the
heavy stocking he wears on his
left leg. This is to help ease a
circulatory ailment which has
plagued Jorgensen since his senior
year at Parker High in Chicago.
At Parker, Jorg netted 23 points
per game as a junior when his
team won the city championship
and then he stepped up the pace
to 30 a contest in his senior year
to earn a second string all-state
berth.
Jorgensen's bum leg is an inch
larger than his good one and needs
to be compressed during the game
so that blood may circulate more
easily and the leg will not swell
any more. This injury forces him
to pace himself through the game
and cuts his efficiency.
Good Ball Handler
Coach Bill Perigo rates Jorgen-
sen a good ball handler with good

judgment and said that if it
wasn't for the leg trouble "you
would 'be reading Jorgensen's
name all over the country." A,
quick left-handed jump shot andI
tenacious guarding are the dis-
tinguishing features of his style
of play.
Jorgensen prefers the fast break
type of ball utilized by the Wol-
verines since he played it in high
school and is used to it.
He attributed the first game set-
back to nervousness and looks for
the team to be a "much improved
ball club." In his opinion the three
I's, Illinois, Indiana and Iowa, will
be the especially rough opponents
but "every night is tough and every
team in the Conference is capable
of beating any other."

NCAA championship tournament
over La Salle last spring, has two
tournaments in the next three
weeks. The Dons are in the De-
Paul Invitational at Chicago along
with Duquesne, Marquette and De-
Paul Dec. 16-17.
After games with Wichita, and
Loyola of New Orleans, San Fran-
cisco moves into New York, Madi-
son Square Garden for the Dec.
26-30 Holiday Festival. The oppo-,
sition consists of Fordham, Syra-
cuse, LaSalle, St. John's of Brook-j
lyn, Duquesne, UCLA and Holyj
Cross.
The top 16 teams, with records
through Dec. 5 and first place
votes:

Captained Golden Gophers
Loken captained the , Golden
Gophers gymnast squad in his
senior year, winning the Big Ten
All-Around title two years and the
N.C.A.A. All-Around one year. He
copped the N.C.A.A. high bar title
and also won flying rings, par-
allel bars, and high bar titles in
Big Ten competition.
Loken climaxed his senior year
with a pictorial spread in LIFE
magazine. The versatile Loken also
proved to be a fine student leader,
becoming president of Phi Epsilon

I-M SCORES
VOLLEYBALL
Alpha Tau Omega 4, Acacia 1
Delta Upsilon 4, Delta Sigma Phi 3
Sigma Chi 4, Phi Delta Theta 1
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 4, Tau Delta Phi 2
Delta Kappa Epsilon 5, Phi Kappa Sigma 1
HANDBALL
Lloyd 2, Williams I
Delta Tau Delta 2, Pi Lambda Phi 1
Theta Xi 2, Zeta Beta Tau 1

r I

Team

W L F Tot.

0

I 1

0)

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

San Francisco 2-0
Kentucky 1-0
N. Carolina St. 2-0
Iowa 1-0
Utah 1-0
Alabama 2-0
Dayton 2-0
Illinois 0-0
Duquesne 1-0
Brig. Young 2-0

6; 1,023

1
1

7 847
7 550
0 548
506
2 275
224
221
220
132

Sports Shorts

f

11

Over 600 persons attended a will be permitted to go to the pit-
banquet last night in Holland chers mound only once for each
honoring Tom Maentz, Captain- pitcher. This is intended to short-
elect of the Michigan football en games. The controversial bonus
team. Maentz, a native of Holland, rule was left untouched .. .
missed the early part of the season The big problem of TV or not
with an injury but returned to star TV faces the Big Ten meeting now
on offense and defense . . . convening in Chicago. Telecasting
Highly regarded Illinois opened of games which were sellouts and
its basketball season last night the "pirating" of other telecasts
with a record-breaking 107-75 vic- will be thoroughly discussed dur-
tory over Butler. Harv Schmidt ing the four day session.
and Captain Paul Judson paced
the winners' attack with 22 points
each ...
Detroit Lion quarterback Bobby
Layne may miss the final game T ry for Oly mp
of the season Sunday because ofaiysfe ny mp
an Injury suffered in the closing
seconds of the first half of the On Jan. 11, 1956, Michigan's
Lion's loss to the Chicago Bears . NCAA Hockey Champions will play
For the first time in nine years, the "cream of the crop" as they
the Gordie Howe-Ted Lindsay encounter the U.S. Olympic Hockey
combination will be broken up. team at Detroit's Olympia Sta-
Detroit Red Wing Coach Jimmy dumD.
Skinner said Red Kelly would
take Lindsay's place on the first At the present time approxi-
line for Thursday's game with the mately 50 ex-coliegite stars are
Boston Bruins. Lindsay will team practicing at Minneapolis and
with Bill Dineen and Alex Delvec- Boston. Head coach, John Mari-
chio ... ucci will select from this group the
All National League baseball 20 best players on Dec. 13 and
players will be required to wear they will then assemble in Duluth,
protective headgear next year. In Minnesota for final instruction be-
the American League managers fore doing a stateside hockey tour.

1
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IT H URSDA
AIRCRAFT
ft SIKORSKY AIRCRAtFT REPRESENTATIVE
IS COMININI PERSOTN TO TELL YOU NOW
TO IQC II Y UR E QI E RI FUTURE
TO At HELICOPTER-
THURSDAY
Iry DEC. 8

;an Puck Stars
sic Squad Posts

a
r
P
r

Heading the list of tryouts are
ex-Wolverine greats-John Mat-
chefts ,51, Williard "Ike" Ikola '52,
Doug Philpoot '52, and Ron Mart-
inson '52. These players helped
Michigan win NCAA Hockey
crowns in 1951-52.
All-American Bill Cleary from
Harvard who last year established'
a new national single season scor-
ing record in posting 89 points
will be vieing for top honors.
Minnesota's All-American, John
Mayasich, will also be one of the
top contenders for a starting berth.

VAN BOVEN SHOES

FI

S T OR E H OU R S D A I L Y 9 TO 5 :s3 0

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