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November 23, 1955 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNES~)AY, NOVEMBER 2~, 1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FOR THE LAYMAN:
Plant Gives Legal Advice

If involved in an auto accident,
the best course to follow is to get
all the names and addresses but
not to make any committment.
Prof. Marcus L. Plant, of the
Law School, says that after an
accident, the persons involved are
;- in no condition to accurately de-
termine fault, and, should not ad-
wit anything.
"Such an admission," Prof. Plant
added, "may be used against you
incourt; there may be a clause
in your insurance policy which

voids that insurance if you admit
liability; or the other party may;
have been guilty of contributory
negligence."
Should the accident be serious
to the extent that someone is in-
jured or killed, or if the car is
damaged so badly that it cannot
be moved, the police must be noti-
fied immediately.
Information that should be ob-
tained from the parties to an acci-
dent includes names _and addresses,

'U' English Professors
To Participate in Council.

Six University English professors
s are giving up their Thanksgiving
holidays to participate in the
forty-fifth annual meeting of the
National Council of Teachers of
English.
The meeting of professors from
almost every college in the country
and some from foreign countries
will be held in Hotels Commodore'
and Roosevelt in New York City,
Nov. 24 to Nov. 26.
"Planning a Research Project
Concerning Our Professional Po-
tential" is one topic on the agenda.
Prof. Warner G. Rice, chairman
of the Michigan English depart-
ment and chairman of the Com-
mittee on Education of College
English Teachers will preside.
This discussion is sponsored by
the Committee on College English
for Non-Major Students and the
Conference on College Composi-
tion and Communication.
G. Kerry Smith, executive sec-
retary of the Association for High-
er Education will speak on "The
Meaning of Professional Stature."
From Ball State Teachers Col-
lege, CCCC member William A.
Sutton will speak on "The Atti-
tudes of Indiana Teachers."
The last speech will be on "What
Most Teachers Want" by CCENS
chairman Edward Foster of the
Georgia Institute of Technology.
Later, the teactlers will break up
into small discussion groups.
Prof. John Weimar from Michi-
gan will take part in, the Friday
Pushes Atomic
Energy Power
BONN, Germany (A)-The Eco-
nongcs Ministry reports West Ger-
many expects to produce electric
power from atomic energy by 1970.
Forbidden atomic research dur-
ing the 10-year Allied occupation,
the Germans are pushing studies
now in an effort to catch up with
other nations.

luncheons along with CCCC chair-
man Jerome W. Archer from Mar-.
quette University.
At that time, the speaker will
be J. Donald Adams, a "New York
Times" book reviewer. He will talk
on "College and the Writer."
Prof. Charles C. Fries, chair-
man of the Michigan English Lan-
guage Institute is a member of a
panel discussion on "Teaching of
English as a Secondary Language."
Speaker and . discussion leader
for the topic, "Literary Interpre-
tation through Behavioral Sci-
ences" is University Prof. Norman
Nelson.
Another University instructor,
Fred Wolcott, will take part in a
discussion on "Recent Research in
Language Arts."
Students Find
Room Buried
Under Paper<
The occupants of South Quad's
room 3116 got a bit of a surprise
Sunday evening when they return-
ed from the movies.
During the four hours they were
gone, a number of unidentified
students completely filled their
12'x20'x8' room with wadded up
newspapers and magazines.
Using laundry carts from the
Quad maintenance department and
large waste bins, it took Larry Feh-
renbaker and Tullio Coccia, two
hours to, rid their room of the
paper inundation.
Bob Seidemann, next door
neighbor, said he heard talking
and rustling of papers through the.
walls about 8 p.m. From the
sounds, he estimated it took about
45 minutes to fill the room.
William Helms, Reeves House
Resident Advisor, said the prank
usually occurs somewhere in the
Quad at least once a year.

names of insurance companies, li-
cense number of the car andinf or-
mation about any witnesses.
In case of accident, your own
insurance company should be noti-
fied immediately.
Don't, under any circumstances,
sign any paper without first read-
ing and understanding it thorough-
ly, Prof. Plant continued.
Real estate transactions, he said,
are one of the main sources of
danger. They involve hidden com-
plications and should be handled
only through a lawyer.
"You should," he said, "be es-
pecially careful about signing any
note or promise to pay, particularly
if a large sum is involved.
"A good rule to follow," he con-
tinued, "is If you don't under-
stand it thoroughly, don't sign it-
see a lawyer.' "
It is also foolhardy, Prof. Plant
said, for a layman to draft his own
legal papers, especially in the case
of wills. .
"Some of those stories of wills
written on egg shells," he com-
mented, "or barn doors holding
up in court may be true, but such
cases invariably involve a long,
expensive court struggle."
Officials Laud
role.
Traffic Plan
LNSIfG (MP-Judges, prosecu-
tors, city attorneys and mayors
yesterday commended the police
and sheriff's 10-point "action pro-
gram" to reduce Michigan traf-
fic .fatalities.
However; none of the groups
adopted as sweeping promises of
strict action against erring motor-
ists as did Monday's conference of
law enforcement chiefs.
Justice of the Peace Kenneth
Sanborn of Macomb County, pres-
ident of the Justice of the Peace
Association, said the judicial
groupscouldnot properly endorse
the 10-point program because their
members must maintain an impar-
tial position fitting their judicial
role.
To Submit Plan
The Union expects to submit a
plan for the operation of the Stu-
dent Book Exchange to Student
Government Council Dec.. 1.
According to Bob Blossey '56,
Executive Secretary of the Union,
"There are still a few problems we
have to work out before we will
be ready to release the plan."
SBX was delegated to the Un-
ion by SGC several weeks ago for
the Union to operate as a non-
profit student service.

1275::.....:: ElCounmtries Receiving Assistance from Russia:: 179
:::::::: "::::::::::::::":" : ::; ::::.:::.:::: ::<. Countries Offered Assistance by Russia
x. ...: ::........American.. ;Econom::::::After...
... ...... . .. ................. ........ ........ ;.........................i..ss~ A ssistan ce...x 194i .. I2S..6 ..-55 i2IL:2::"S:a ' :Kx:;:i:::.,:.i.......r.....
.. ..:e ::: .. ... . ..... .. . ... .. : . .., :":::c.: : ; . . .; . .. . ........ .. .,, , .. ... ... ..s £ . .}. , .t r , z i ., ... r . ,B ef... .. .... r e.£ . .. . ....1 1 8 0;.. ... :
.... ..... M:, .... ....................... ... .. ....... .,...,,..z 000.a.fH: ,
Fiscal Ye £a Ko...,.re ,.ta..,,...,.....E'.._
..AF......HANISTAN..""t .::: ........ £: 4 ji: i4E3£
.....................359.....RAN A er133Ecoomc Ate
...............I...A N
Assistance
Beor 12 ...::::: : ::::::::::::'::::::::::::::::::::::":: -:::::::T/O::::::Y::::AY
Fiscal Year

DISTRIBUTION OF U.S. FOREIGN AID
(Total for 1946-55 Fiscal Years: 51 Billion Dollars)
w-ELRoPA- EMiltcnary
" +a ,,.. o , sIdES .
- .
0 o o~~ .5.PACIFIC
. EOEKO :aROTHERRS
t AEconomic Aidn Economic Aid MIlitary Aid
"' ' ' a ' a ' /D ASTAS/A
0 . P4AC/C % fA/V EASTASIA
BEFORE KOREA AFTER KOREA
Total Aid 26 8Billion Total Aid 25 Billion

r .... . ....S '>....... :::::
:e .........................:: ........H...A..
::1 ............. :. ............. . . .. ..................... ...

...... ....................... ......... :::::::: : 2 1 ::..:: ; :::,:
::::::::.............-...........I.
.. .......... ....... .. ..... .. .. ...... .. .. .. ... .. . .. .. ...... .. .. .:. ... .. .. .

I I Y MW WY

Reds Drive For.Bigger Voice in Near East and Asia

By DAVID L. BOWEN
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
Western diplomats are rapidly
becoming convinced that the Sov-
iet Union is ready to launch a

economic influence, the Russian
ambassador in Cairo recently told
reporters:
"We will send economic mis-
sions, scientific missions, agricul-

powerful drive to become the eco- tural missions, meteorological mis-
nomic and military patron of all sions and any other kind of mis-
the vast region between the Medi- sion you can imagine that' will
terranean Sea and the Pacific Oc- help these countries."
ean. As the accompanying map shows,
Russia now has direct economic the scene of this new Soviet "eco-
assistance programs under way in nomic offensive" has not been a
India and Afghanistan. An Af- major recipient of United States
ghanistani mission is in Czecho- foreign assistance. In the 10 years
slovakia discussing arms ship- since the end of the war, 75 per
ments, and Russia has followed up : cent of the $51,336,000,000 the Un-:
its arms deal with Egypt with of- ited States has sent overseas has
fers of a wide variety of economic gone to Western Europe. The big-
and technical assistance to that gest shares of aid to Middle East-
nation and her Arab neighbors. ern, Asian and Pacific nations
Offers of economic aid also have have gone to those actively par-
been made to Burma and Indone- ticipating in Western defense
sia. plans -Greece, the Nationalist
As an example of the fervor government on Formosa, South Ko-
with which the Soviet Union is rea, the Philippines and Japan.
pursuing its effort to widen its Figures compiled by the De-

I
s
3
r

partment of Commerce and pub-
lished late last month show that
the most striking alteration in the
foreign assistance picture during
the past decade is the new empha-
sis on military help. In the five
fiscal years before the Korean con-
flict started, 95 per cent of the
26 billion dollars sent to foreign
nations went to build up shatter-
ed economies. Most of this was
put to work in Europe, and suc-
ceeded in practically eliminating
the threat of Communist subver-
sion there.
In the five fiscal years since the
start of the Korean War, 53 per
cent of the 25-million-dollar Am-
Yrican assistance program was aim-
ed at building military strength.
In the 1955 fiscal year, 57 per cent
of foreign aid was for military pur-
poses.
Prior to the Korean War, prac-
tically no economic aid was fur-
nished the Middle Eastern and As-

w..; -::

i

I$

MISSILE AND CONTROL EQUIPMENT DEPARTMENTS " NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION " DOWNEY, CALIFORNIA

GIFT UMBRELLA
Cwehnti
4.85

ENGINEERS,

SCIENTISTS-
PHYSICISTS,
MATHEMATICIANS
important on-campus
interviews soon!
North American Missile and Control Departments
Representative Will Be Here Nov. 30, Dec. 1.
You'll learn first hand about the advantages
and opportunities in choosing a career with
future at North American. Here engineers
and scientists are now discovering new
frontiers in four exciting new fields:

I

11

N
-F

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Reg. 7.95 to 10.95
Extraordinary savings
on couturier-slim
umbrellas
exquisitely designed
with imported
handles from france,
Italy and England
.. . each gifted
with beauty and
practicality, a
lasting reminder
throughout the
year. Choose
from a multitude
of patterns and fabrics
in costume-
complementing
colours.

ELECTRO- MECHANICAL
Missile Guidance Systems
Fire and Flight Control Systems
Computers, Recorders
ROCKET PROPULSION
High Thrust Engines
Propellants
Pumps

SUPERSONIC AIRFRAMES
Structures
Thermal Barriers
Vibrations and Flutter
NUCLEAR ENGINEERING
Research Reactors
Medical Reactors
Power Generation Reactors

:v}}riy:li: is

' I

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