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November 13, 1955 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-13

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1955

T8E MICHIGAN DAILY

PALM Tit '

THE MICHIGAN DAIL~ ~Af~V 'w'umu'w - ~ ~aSAWE~45~I

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Journalism
Lacks Grads,
Maurer Says
"There's certainly no over-
abundance of graduate .students
in this department," Prof. Wesley
H. Maurer of the journalism de-
partment said recently.
At present, there are twenty
graduates working for their M.A.
in journalism. Thirteen are in
residence, completing the first
two-year phase, and the rest are
working on newspapers through-
out the country.
The graduate program was de-
veloped in 1948. Previous to that,
there had been a one-year pro-
gram, which the student spent
here, taking advanceddcourses in
journalism. It was then extended
;to four years, the first two to be
spent here, the remaining time
working on a cooperating news-
paper.,
Prof. Maurer feels that the
added time' is essential. Defects
in the undergraduate program,
such as deficiencies in required
courses, must be repaired; cul-
tural interests which have been
by-passed are advanced; and
special courses in advanced journ-
alism are scheduled.
These special courses offer stu-
dents the opportunity to make
an intensive study of subjects
useful in foreign news administra-
tion, domestic interpretation of
foreign affairs, foreign corres-
pondence, and other similar sub-
jects leading to administrative
positions on the press.
When this period of training is
completed, the student may apply
for intern work on leading United
States newspapers.
Reuben To Speak
William Reuben, author of the
controversial book, "The Atom
;Spy Hoax," will speak at 3 p.m.
today at the Unitarian Church,
1917 Washtenaw.
Reuben contends that all those
convicted of stealing atomic sec-
rets in Canada and the United
States were innocent, convicted on
fraudulent evidence.

Group Will Discuss
'Intellectual Curiosity'

By ETHEL KOVITZ
The growning -national concern
about the function and effects of
higher education today has causect
questions to be asked at the Uni-
versity, too.
As a result, a forum on "Does
the Literary College Thwart Stu-
dents' Intellectual Curiosity?" will
be held at the League at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday.
Sponsored by the Literary Col-
lege Steering Committee, the con-
ference will consist of a discus-
sion between two students and
two faculty members and an open
forum.
Forum Topic
The forum topic stems partly
from articles criticizing colleges
and universities today and warn-
ing of problems to come. These
articles have been unusually fre-
quent in magazines and news-
papers within the past six months.
It is impossible to criticize the
actions of a university until the
reason for those actions is de-
cided, most of these authors agree.
However, educators throughout
the country disagree on the pur-
pose of higher education.
"The purpose of an academic
institution is, or ought to be, to
produce men of singular and ex-
ceptional talent," Prof. Howard
Mumford Jones, of the English
department at Harvard, stated in
a recent Atlantic Monthly article.
'Raise Level'
On the other hand, Kenneth:
Lindsay said in another article,
when speaking of a liberal arts
school, that "the primary aim is
to raise the general education
level of a society."
The president of Miami Univers-
ity in Oxford, Ohio, John D. Mill-
ett, said recently, "Higher edu-
cation has held to a definition of
purpose which has placed intel-
lectual ability and skill at its core
. we have extended our defini-
tion of intellectual development
beyond that of any previous time
or of any other society. Yet in this
purpose of enlargement we are
in constant danger of losing our
intellectual rudder."

Authors give a reason for their
long look into the purpose of in-
stitutions of higher learning and
the extent to which these pur-
poses are being accomplished. It
is the increased enrollment in col-
leges and the further increase
predicted.
More Top Students
President Millett feels that there
is no point in increasing the num-
ber of people who go to college
unless "we first increase the pro-
portion of those of top ability who
go to college."
He also believes that the in-
creased enrollment should notgo
only to the publicly supported
schools, but also to the privately
endowed ones.
In criticizing the diversity of
universities today, President Mill-
ett speaks of the university sur-
rendering "any intellectual pre-
tense whatsoever" and becoming
"simply a way-station where
youths spend four years, the main
result of which is a postponement
of entrance into the labor market."
Prof. Jones is most concerned
about the elective system used in
most universities today. By not
having a free elective system that
allows a student to take courses
only in his own field if he so de-
sires, "we are postponing or ob-
literating the expression of talent"
as well as refusing to train him
to make his own decisions.
Linguistics Speech
To Be Presented
Prof. David L. Olmsted of the
University of California at Davis
will speak about "Linguistics and
Ethnohistory" tomorrow in Audi-
torium C, Angell Hall. His public
lecture is sponsored by the an-
thropology department.

Lawsy!
ESCANABA,, Mich. (A)-Har-
old Stone, 49, came to Michigan
to hunt rabbits and lost 32
bucks.
Stone, a resident of Kevil,
Ky., thought he could save $13
by giving a phony name and
fake Michigan address to buy a
$2 resident hunting license. The
non-resident license costs $15.
Stone was genial and chatty
when stopped for a routine li-
cense check by conservation
officers Glenn Price and Robert
Bezzi. But his southern accent
roused their suspicions.
Stone pleaded guilty to the
fraud Friday before Justice of
the Peace John Demay who
fined him $32..
Fauri To Confer
In Washington
Dean Fedele F. Fauri of the
School of Social Work leaves to-
night for' conferences with mem-
bers of the cabinet in Washing-
ton.
Chairman of the Federal Ad-
visory Council on Employment
Security, Dean Fauri will meet to-
morrow with Secretary of Labor
James P. Mitchell to schedule the
next meeting of the council.
Tuesday Dean Fauri will con-
fer with Secretary of Health, Edu-
cation and Welfare Folsom. Dean
Fauri was not at liberty to com-
ment further on the subject of his
discussion.

GUEST PROFESSOR:
Wald Says Humanities
Important to Science

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Scien e is knowing the way the
world is put together.
Prof. George Wald, professor of
biochemistry at Harvard Univers-
ity, stressed the importance of
combining the study of science
with the humanities in an inter-
view yesterday.
The professor, here at the Uni-
versity for two weeks as consul-
tant in biological sciences, feels
the tradition of education changed
a century ago.
"We have two kinds of educated
men now," the Harvard professor
said, "amputated humanists and
humanities-deficient scientists."
The study of science, he believes,
should be considered a humanity,
where one learns the nature of
the universe and how living dif-
fers from the non-living.
"Telling a child how a refriger-
ator is put together will not in-
terest him in the study of science.
However, teaching him how the
universe is created is teaching him
science. Showing him how to
apply his scientific knowledge is
teaching him technology," Prof.
Wald added.
Stressing the importance for
the educated person to combine
science with his study of art,

music and literature, Prof. Wald
referred to Shelley, Milton and
Tolstoy who all showed deep "un-
derstanding of the scientific in
their writing."

00."
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