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November 12, 1955 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-12

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THE MT CMGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 121, 1955

ETY THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1955

Milstein Maintains
Vlusical Tradition

"I should like to play better..,
This is the aspiration of Nath-
an Milstein, the virtuoso regarded
as one of the finest violinists alive.
A former pupil of the late Leo-
pold Auer, who taught Heifetz,
Zimbalist, Elman and other well-
known violinists, Milstein, appear-
ing at 8:30 p.m. Monday in Hill
Auditorium, represents the great
tradition for which Auer-trained
artists have become noted.
Has Musical Intensity
Auer, possibly the greatest violin
teacher of all time, combined a
thorough mastery of technique
with a spiritual intensity and re-
verence for music which has be-
come proverbial. Auer counseled
his students to start practice by
getting on their knees as if in
church or temple, for he felt great
music is an art that demands the
highest devotion.
This tradition of spirituality in
music was Milstein's inheritance.
Although Milstein appears most
often as soloist, he is an ardent
chamber music fan and often plays
with amateur and professional
groups. "Chamber music clubs can
do more than almost anything else
to enrich the musical life of Amer-
ica," he said.
Advocates Music Clubs
He went on to explain that in
small towns, players can usually
discover each other because ev-
erybody knows everyone else. "But
in big cities we should have cham-
ber music clubs where players can
meet each other and arrange to
play in quartets or other combi-
nations," he continued. Begin-
ners could work under direction
with others near their own level;
Meat Tests
Result Good

I

the better players would play with
more advanced groups.
Milstein thinks such groups
would accomplish two things.
String players would be learning
great music intimately and at the
same time enjoying themselves.
"String quartet music is some
of the finest music in the world.
Playing chamber music together
develops a real devotion to music,
not glamour through music. There
is no appeal for a show-off. Cham-
ber music is like fine conversation
among musical equals-everybody
has a chance at the theme, no one
is limited to an "ooompah" accom-
paniment. The number is large
enough for company, but not so
big as to be impersonal ' like an
orchestra or chorus."
Audience Increases Understanding
Milstein believes that amateur
performances would greatly in-
crease music 4understanding and
enjoyment. ' here is no audience
more challenging to a violinist
than an audience with a large
sprinkling of chamber music play-
ers," he said.
"They won't let you get away
with anything less than the best
that is in you, but they appreciate
to the full every nuance that is
really good."
Modern West
Dedicates New
Hall of Fame
OKLAHOMA CITY (WP) - The
stirring saga of the Old West was
revived here yesterday amid a Hol-
lywood-like blend of galloping
horses, bugles and blaring micro-
phones.
Twelve-hundred horsemen, a
full platform of founders and thou-
sands of spectators who scrambled
to vantage points around Persim-
mon Hill, joined in dedication cere-
monies of the National Cowboy
Hall of Fame site.
"This reminds me of a Warner
Brothers movie," quipped Will
Rogers Jr., son of the late famous
Oklahoma cowboy-humorist and
a top-railer in his own right.
Rogers flew here from Beverly
Hills, Calif., to serve as master of
ceremonies.
"The legend of the American
cowboy, no mater how phoney, no
matter Pow much Hollywood
horses it up, still is the great sym-
bol of America. What the knight
in armor is to Europe, what the
legend of Robin Hood is to Eng-
land, so the story of the western
cowboy is to this country," Rogers
told the gathering.

Gl eeClub's
Tour On TV
This week's "Michigan Report,"
a production of University Tele-
vision, will demonstrate that Bos-
well had nothing on the Univer-
sity of Michigan Men's Glee Club.
Members of the glee club who
participated in an extensive con-
cert tour of European cities last
summer, will relive the outstand-
ing experiences of the trip on
"The Grand Tour," today at 5:15
p.m. on Station WWJ-TV.
Their tour received enthusiastic
praise from audiences in Italy,
Germany, Austria, Switzerland and
France, where college singing
groups are usually small and in-
formal.
Prof. Phillip Duey, the glee club
director, will explain the diffi-
culties involved in arranging and
financing a concert tour of such
size, and will recount amusing im-
pressions of the European attitude
toward, the glee club's activities
on and off the stage.
All of the American folk songs,
college songy, and Broadway hits
featured on-the tour were arrang-
ed by Prof. Duey.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)

Doctoral Examination for Gail San-
ner Crouse, Zoology; thesis: "Differenti-
ation of and Host Reaction to Homo-
plastic Intracerebral Implants of Em-
bryonic Rat Rudiments with Emphasis
on Endodermal Derivatives," Mon., Nov.
14, West Council Room, Rackham Bldg.,
at 2:00 p.m. Chairman, N. E. Kemp.
Placement Notices1
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS:
Representatives from the following
will be at the Engrg. School:
Mon., Nov. 14:'
Varian Associates, Palo Alto, Calif.-
all levels in Elect., Instru., Nuclear,
Physics, and Science for Research, De-
vel., Design, and Production.
Tues. and, Wed., Nov. 15 and, 16:
The Visking Corp., Chicago, Il.-all
levels of Chem. E. and Mech. E. for
Research and Devel., Summer and Reg-
ular.
Thurs., Nov. 17:
Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co., Milwaukee,
Wis.-all levels in Elect., Mech., Ind.,
Civil, Mining, Chem., Metal., Physics
and Math. for Research, Devel., Design,
Manufacturing, Process, and Factory
or Field Service.
American Agricultural Chemical Co.,

Detroit. Mich.--B.S. and M.S. in Chem.
E. for Research and Production.
Dow Corning Corp., Midland, Mich.-
B.S. and M.S. in Chemn., Elect., Instru..
Material. Physics and Science for Re-
search. Devel., Design, Construction,
and Sales.
Ideal Electric & Manufacturing Co..
Mansfield, Ohio-B.S. in Elect. E. and
Mech. E. for Sales.
Pillsbury Mills, Inc., Minneapolis,
Minn.-all levels, in Chem. and Physics,
B.S. in Elect. and Mech., B.S. and M.S.
In Industrial for Research, Devel., and
Production.
Corning Glass Works, Albion, Mich.
all levels in Chem., Instru., Material,
Mech., Engrg. Mechanics and B.S. and
M.S. in Elect. and Industrial for Re-
search.
Thurs. and Fri., Nov. 17 and 18:
The Atlantic Refining Co., Crude Oil
Production Div., Dallas, Tex.-all levels
in Chem., Instru., Math., Physics, and
Science; B.S. and M.S. in Civil, Elect.,
Mech., Engrg. Mech. for Research, De-
vel., and Production.
Sperry Rand Corp., Remington Rand
Eckert-Mauchly Div., Phila., Penn.--all
levels in Chem., Elect., Ind., Instru.,
Math., Mech., Engrg. Mech., Metal., and
Physics for Research, Devel., and De-
sign.
For appointments contact the Engrg.
Placement Office, 347 W.. E., Ext. 2182.

BARRACKS NEWSPAPER -- Virginia Rothfuss, secretary of the Michigan Historical Collections,
points out The Agate, a humorous newspaper written in 1846 by soldiers at Ft. Wilkins, Michigan.
Exhibit Features Upper Peninsula Past

By DON KAMIN

CHICAGO (JP)-Representatives
of the nation's meat industry were
told yesterday that the use of anti-
biotics soon may result in fresher,
Juicier and more tender meats
reaching America's dinner tables.
Researchers said good results
were obtained both when antibiot-
ics were injected into the live
animal just before slaughter or
when meat cuts were dipped into
an antibiotic solution immediately
after slaughter.
The explained that the anti-
biotics destroy the bacteria that
cause spoilage. Live healthy ani-
mals have a built-in mechanism
that keeps these bacteria in check.
After the animal is killed, how-
ever, the invaders are free to mul-
tiply rapidly and cause spoilage.
Only "trace amounts" of the
antibiotic are needed, they said,
adding that what little may re-
main is destroyed in cooking.
Dr. H. G. Luther, director of
agriculture research and develop-
ment for Charles Pfizer & Co., a
pharmaceutical concern, described
how he injected terramycin into
the animal shortly before slaugh-
ter.
He said meat from an animal
thus injected can be aged at high-
er temperatures than is otherwise
possible, permitting a more nearly
normal tenderizing action by the
enzymes in the meat itself.
He said such meats can be sat-
isfactorily kept without refrigera-
tion for as long as three days
after slaughter at temperatures as
high as 95 degrees Fahrenheit.
Baha'i Temple, Wilmette, Ill.

Blue Ink, Silk Paper, and Quin-.
quinon Quill printed a hand-writ-
ten newspaper in 1846.
These names were the pseudon-
yms of the editors of a newspaper
called The Agate, which was writ-
ten by and for soldiers at Fort
Wilkins, Michigan, and which is
now one of the features of the
current "Michigan's Upper Penin-
sula" exhibit on display at the
Michigan Historical Collections.
The paper is "mostly foolish-
ness," F. Clever Bald,, Assistant
Director of the Michigan Histori-
cal Collections, said. "But the
paper is notable for the small
watercolor of Ft. Wilkins on its
front page, showing the barracks
on a strip of land between Lake
Fanny Hooe'and Lake superior."
The exhibit, which is on display
in three glass eases, presents a
varied account of the history of
the Upper Peninsula.
Included in the display is the
indenture of the sale of half the
De Bonne - de Repentigny Seig-
Airse, Wiley
To Debate
"Our Foreign Policy-Right or
Wrong?" will be the question when
Senators Alexander Wiley (R-
Wisc.) and Wayne Morse (D-Ore.)
debate at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Hill Auditorium. ,
The discussion is sponsored by
tho Oratorical Association and is
part of the University Lecture
Course.

niory at Sault Ste. Marie in 1751.
Included in this sale is all the
land on which the city of Sault
Ste. Marie, the oldest city in Mich-
igan and the third oldest city in
the United States, now stands.
Picture Loggers
"Lumbering in the Northern
Peninsula" is a collection of photo-
graphs depicting loggers in 1891
working at the camp at Hermans-
Four Confer
In St, Louis,
The Adult Education Association
opened its three day national con-
ference in St. Louis, Missouri, yes-
terday.
Fifteen hundred educators are
attending the conference to dis-
cuss how adult education pro-
grams can improve community
living.
The conference will also feature
outstanding programs that have
been brought about through co-
operative citizen activity. Work-
shops and discussions on goals and
methods of teaching geared to the
needs of adults, as well as areas
of social concern are also included
in the program.
University personnel participat-
ing in the conference are: Prof.
Howard Y. McClusky and Prof.
Watson Dickerman of the educa-
tion school; Blue Carstenson and
John Hawley of the Extension Ser-
vice.

ville. Loggers are shown hard at
work pulling the "big wheels"
which were used for hauling logs
to the old train which 'carried
them to the camp.
The mines which made Michi-
gan first in. production of copper
from 1847-1887 and first in pro-
duction of iron, ore from 1890-
1900 are shown in the display. Pic-
tured is the "Old ~ Historical
Stump" in Negaunee, where in 1845
iron ore was discovered in the
Lake Superior region for the first
time. The ore was found under
the roots of a fallen pine tree by
the chief of the Chippewa Tribe
of Indians.
Contrasting the Sault Locks in
1853 and the present-day Sault
Canal, another case features the
world-renowned Soo Canal. Dr.
Bald's book, "The Sault Canal
Through 100 Years," which was
written for the Sault Locks Cen-
tennial Celebration, is included in
the exhibit.
Rock Collecting
Rock collecting is one of the
unusual and interesting hobbies in
the Upper Peninsula. A booklet
about rock and agate collecting is
included in the Sports and Hobbies
section, which also shows maps of
scenic trails and winter sports in
the Upper Peninsula,
The many beautiful waterfalls
and pictured rocks, including
"Miner's Castle," a sandstone peak
where "Father Marquette preach-
ed to the Indians in their canoes
below," conclude the exhibit, con-
firming the reason why the Upper
Peninsula of Michigan is a favor-
ite vacation spot.

Come

Sunday

YOUR BIG RED LETTER DAY'.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00A.M.,. 9:00
A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.,L 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone No 2-1121.
William C. Bennet, Pastor.
10:00-Sunday School.
11:00-"Giving Christ Pre-Eminence." Rev. Roy
Gustaf son.
6:00-Student Guild.
7:00--"How God Saves Sinners." Rev. Roy Gus-
tafson.
Wed., 7:30-Prayer Meeting. We extend a cor-
dial welcome to each of you.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, Eugene
A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship. Glenn Cunning.
ham will be the speaker at the 9:00 Service.
Dr. Abbey will preach at 10:45 "Living in a
Responsible Society."
9:30-10:30 A.M. Two discussion groups, one a
Bible Study Group of the Sermon on the
Mount, the other "The Teachings of Jesus."
5:00 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Program, "Is there a Life
After Death?"
7:30 P.M. Fireside Forum, "Choosing a Marriage
Partner." Dr. Peterson, of the Sociology Dept.
will be the speaker.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, Open
Daily.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH'
State and Williams Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45 .A.M Nursery, all departments of Church
School and Junior Church in Douglas Chapel.
10:45 A.M. Public Worship. Dr. Parr will preach
on "OUR MOST DIFFICULT SUBJECT."
5:30 P.M. Pilgrim Fellowship will have "Project
Night."
7:00 P.M. Student Guild. Supper at 6:00 o'clock.
Dr. Marie Rasey of Wayne University, guest
speaker on "SPIRITUAL VALUES IN EDUCA-
TION."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
EdwardH.sRedmanvMinister.
10:00 A.M. Unitarian Church School. Unitarian
Adult Group. Prof. George Hourani on "Islam."
11:00 A.M. Services of Worship: Rev. Edward H.
Redman preaching: "Man's Concepts of God"
6:30 P.M. Unitarian Student Group - transport
from Lane Hall and Stockwell at 6:15 P.M.
Dr. Herbert Smith, Dramatics Dept. of Adrian
College, repeat on "Role-Playing."
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Countil)
Hill St. & Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor.
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Worship Service.
10:00 A.M Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. Supper followed by Program. Prof.
Ralph Hammett, Speaker. "Church Art & Ar-
ch itecture."

to Church

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herold of ,Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundvs-1,~00-1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Services, with ser-
mon by the pastor, "When Religion Is A Joy"
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. At 6:45 the group
picture for the 'Ensian will be taken, followed
by a program on "The Glad Church and the
Sad Church."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service
7:00 Evening Service.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev, Andrew Missiras
9:30 Matins
10:00 Sunday School.
10:30 Divine Liturgy
Sermon in Greek and English.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Reverend Press -
"A Grateful Heart."
7:00 P.M. The Student Group. Prof. Gordon
Van Wylen of The School of Engineering,
"Christ Is Able,"
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
Minister: C. H. Loucks
Ministers: C. H. Loucks and Duane L. Day.
Student Advisor: Beth Mahone
Sunday, Nov. 13
9:45 Guild Bible Class, We are studying the
parables of Jesus.
11:00 Worship Service. "The Courage To Be" -
Minister Loucks.
6:45 The Guild will hear Dr. C. 1. Itty of India
who will speak on the general theme "Revolu-
tion and Reconciliation."
ME.MORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets.
Rev. Marvin Jewell, Interim Minister.
10:45 Morning Worship. Sermon: "Christ, Lost and
Found."
9:45 A.M. Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
6:00 P.M. Supper, Congregational Church. Speak-
er: Dr. Marie Rasey, Wayne University: "Spir-
itual Values in Education."
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
Sunday services at 8. 9, 11 A.M. and 8 P.M.
Breakfast following the 8 & 9 A.M. services.
5:30 Buffet Supper.
7:00 Educational Series.

SPIRITUAL UNITY
The Hope of the World

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In all the sacred scriptures there
s the promise of a world Saviour
who will bring universal peace and
prosperity.
In the Christian scriptures, He is
spoken of as the ,Spirit of Truth;
in the Jewish, the Lord of Hosts;
in the Moslem, the Great An-
nouncement; in the Buddhist, the
Fifth Buddhc; in the Hindu, the
Laid Krishna.
In the Baha'i Scriptures, this prom-
ise of the 'return' of God's Mes-
senger is fulfilled in the Person and
writings of Baha'u'llah.
His message is a call to religious
unity, and not a new path to im-
mortality. It is the ancient path
cleared of the debris of the imag-
inations and superstitions of men

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue.
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Sunday 11 A.M. II

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
. mA TImlnT r.EMTFR

I

11

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