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November 11, 1955 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-11

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FUMAF, NONE 3ER 11,195!5

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE M'

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 195w THE MICHIGAN DAILY ?AOE UWE

Glee Clubs Announce Programs

By MARJ BLUTTMAN
In a Joint concert at 8:30 p.m.
tomorrow in Hill Auditorium, the
Singing Hoosiers of Indiana Uni-
versity, a male choral group of
some 50 voices, will share billing
with the University Men's Glee
Club.
Directing the visiting univer-
sity's vocal numbers and specialty
acts will be George F. Krueger,
Associate Professor of Choral Mu-
sic at Indiana.
His career has included asso-
ciation with such groups as the
Westminster Choir of Princeton,
N.J., and the Philadelphia Sym-
phony Orchestra,
Varied Program
The Singing Hoosiers, basically
a choir of men's voices, have varied
their program to include specialty
groups. The Hoosier Queens, ten
coeds who will offer song-and-
dance routines, a dance duo and a
male quartet will appear with the
glee club in their performance.
Opening the program, the In-
diana group will offer "Our Song
of Joy" followed by the lighter
"Man Is For A Woman Made,"
which includes a solo.
"Lonesome Valley" and "Ugly
Woman" are next on the bill, with
"The Eagle" closing the first por-
tion of the Singing Hoosiers' per-
formance.
Queens To Perform
Numbers by the Hoosier Queens,
the male quartet and the dance
team will provide a transition be-
Union To Sponsor
First 'Sock Hop'
In Rainbow Room
"Sock Hop," first dance of its
kind to be sponsored by the Un-
ion, will be held tomorrow night
from 9 p.m. to midnight in the
Rainbow Ballroom of the Union.
Sportswear and a bright pair of
socks constitute the mode of ap-
parel. Students may come pre-
pared to remove their shoes be-
cause the Union has a special type
of floor wax designed to keep socks
in good shape.
Couples will dance to the music
of Red Johnson and his Orchestra
which features a saxophone, trum-
pet, trombone, piano and drums.
Union officials feel that this is
one of the most unusual dances
they have ever sponsored, because
it deviates from the ordinary "run-
of-the-mill" themes. Decorations
will include two giant sized socks
suspended from the ceiling.
The dance is replacing Rain-
bow Rendezvous, which was origi-
nally scheduled.

On rth.e %J e
By ESTHER MARGOLIS
Another game . .. parties . . . hayrides . . . dances, the same fun,
yet a little different, for this weekend parents will be joining in on
the festive activities.
Sigma Delta Taus are planning their whole weekend around their
parents' advent to the University campus.
Tyler House residents will also be honoring their parents in a
similar manner.
Fathers to Arrive
Fathers will also be in the limelight at the Beta Theta Pi, Chi
Phi, Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Xi Delta, Gamma Phi
Beta, and Kappa Kappa Gamma houses.
Sigma Alpha Mus, plus dates, plus Hillel's ballroom, plus decora-
tions, equal the Samma Cabana, a nightclub affair to be put on by
the Sammies tomorrow night.
On the same order is Reeves House's party, "The Continental,"
also to be held tomorrow night. Entertainment will be offered, via a
Monte Carlo atmosphere, a band featured in night club surroundings
and an open-open house from 8 to 10:30 p.m. tomorrow.
'Hard Times' Party
Coeds attending the Delta Sigma Pi "Hard Times" party tomor-
row night, had better plan on informality, since the party is really
a square dance.
Tau Delta Phi, Winchell House and Betsy Barbour are following
through on the same scheme of old-fashioned fun. Barbour women
will be sponsoring a square dance, while the Tau Delts and Winchell
House men will be featuring a hayride.
Sigma Phi dates!! Get out your fish nets and lines for the
"Shrimp" Dance. Masqueraded mariners will be dancing to music of
a band from Jackson, Michigan.
"Hoosier Hop"
"Hoosier Hop" is the theme for the Green House dance to be held
tomorrow night with music by Carol Kenney and her band.
Cooley and Straus houses are combining forces for their dance,
"Autumn Nocturne," scheduled for tomorrow night. The dressy af-
fair will feature Alex Campbell and his Band. Nu Sigma Nu will be
holding a post-game party and feature the music of Bob Dyspurinia
and his Band.
To complete the weekend, record dances will be sponsored by the
following houses:,Acacia, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Delta Chi, Phi Kappa
Sigma, Sigma Chi, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Phi Alpha Kappa, Gomberg
House, Alpha Epsilon Pi and Kelsey House.

'Crop and Saddle' Selects Riders;
Plans Various Team Maneuvers

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
THE FRIARS-Members of the newly formed octet which will
give their first performance tomorrow are Tom Schill, in the
center, surrounded by Rom Portwood, Marshall Franke, John
Varoch, Ted Wybrecht, Steve Hauser, Dwight Davi's and Jack
Leonard.

tween the first two groups of
songs.
The popular ballad, "I Only Have
Eyes For You," will start the
second section of the program,
preceded by "Jerry" and the more
spiritual "I Believe." Also in a
vein of serenity, "The Battle Hymn
of the Republic" closes Indiana
University's part of the joint con-
cert.
Traditionally beginning with the
hymn "Laudes Atque Carmina,"
the Men's Glee Club, directed by
Walter S. Collins of the music de-
partment, will take the stage. In
their first group of songs, num-
bers include the serious "We Give
Thanks To Thee," a rousing Shu-
bert song, "Contradiction" and a
modern American variation on a
Western theme in "Roll A Rock
Down."
'Oklahoma' Selection
Next on the program will be the
perennial favorite from Rogers
and Hammerstein's "Oklahoma,"
entitled "Everything's Up to Date
in Kansas City."
From the score of a film de-
picting the life of Hans Christian
Anderson comes "Wonderful Cop-
enhagen" by Frank Loesser. With
a bass solo, Dan Jordan will ac-
company the Glee Club to the
humorous "Dry Bones."
Providing a break between the
Glee Club's two sections of song,
will be a new organization, the
Friars. In their premiere, the oc-
tet- will feature several numbers
in a light, whimsical style.

A medley of eight Michigan
songs will comprise the next sec-
tion of the program, including the
old number "Ann Arbor Days"
which has been revived in honor of
visiting Glee Club alumni.
Other collegiate melodies will
be "'Tis of Michigan We Sing," "A
Toast to Michigan," "I Wanna Go
Back to Michigan," "Michigan
Men," "Drink, Drink, Joy Rules
the Day," featuring a solo by James
Berg, "In College Days" and "The
Victors."
Tickets for the combined con-
cert may still be obtained in the
Administration Building.

Five new members of Crop and}
Saddle, honorarary drill and ex-#
hibition team of the riding club,
were chosen recently.
Selected from many entries were!
Mary Jane Briggs, Alice Cohan,
Bill Lozano, Kim Henry and Joan
Logan, to fill vacancies left from
last year. Membership in the,
group now stands at 12, which is
the usual number.
WAA President Jay Lee Duke
and Mr. and Mrs, James Alder,
owners of the Huron River Riding
Stables, judged the entries. Skills
that were taken into consideration
were the ability and correctness of
.handling a horse at a walk, trot
and canter along with mounting
and dismounting.
Dancing on Horseback
Square dances, starting at a
walk on horseback, leading up to
a trot and then graduating into
a canter, will be one of the high-
lighted activities of the team.
Groups Plan
rDiscussions,
Social Events
With the Indiana football game
and the Men's Glee Club spot-
lighted for the weekend, church
groups on campus have planned
a program ranging from debates
to talent shows.
Gamma Delta, of the University
Lutheran Chapel, will meet to-
day at the Union and then proceed
to the I-M building for an evening
of swimming, volley ball, and sim-
ilar activities.
Canterbury House, student Epis-
copal group, will hold a panel dis-
cussion on "Authority of the
Church vs. Authority of the In-
dividual" Sunday evening.
The Congregational and Disciples
Guild will hold a Toymaker's
Workshop today in honor of a
former resident. The toys will be
sent to a hospital in Philadelphia.
Newman Club will hold a Re-
cord Dance from 8 p.m. to mid-
night today at the Father Rich-
ard Center.
Featured event will be a talent
show consisting of singing and gui-
tar picking.
Sunday evening, following the
weekly supper club, Hillel will hold
a film presentation of the "Life
of Theodore Harzel", founder of
the modern zionist movement.
Tuesday, Music Night will be held
featuring "Kol Nidre" by Jan
Pearce, Beethoven's "Sixth Sym-
phony," and "Rhapsody in Blue",
by Gershwin.

They will be conducted as
though the horse and rider were
a single person on two feet. As
team members go through the in-
tricate maneuvers, the square
dance will be completed with mu-
sic, a caller and partners in each
set of eight.
Another important part of the
program planned for the team will
be special drills. Precise maneuv-
ers in twos, threes and fours, close
order work and other formations
will also be practiced.
Whistle Signals
At first, spoken commands will
be given as students go through
these maneuvers on horseback. As
they become more proficient, the

maneuvers will be completed with
whistle signals, instead of verbal:
Other team members, chosen
previously, who comprise the doz-
en are Irwin Perelstein, drillmas-
ter of the team, Peg Davis, Anne
Livesey, Zena Gefter, Laura Wil-
son, Leona Junko and Joan Mc-
Afee.
H illelzapoppin'
Interviews for positions on
the Hillelzapoppin' C enitr al
Committee will be held from 4
to 6 p.m. today at the Hillel
Foundation, 1429 Hill.
Chairmanships available are
ticket sales, stage manager,
programs and supervisor.

--CAMPUS--"
211 S. State
NO 8-9013
--DOWNTOWN.
iuicsu s205 EL Libert
musicNSHOPSNO 2-0675
for the Finest in Recorded music

NATHAN MILSTEIN

FASH IONS,

CELEBRITIES, PARTIES:

Editor Tells of 'Mademoiselle' Activities

I

Events Around Campus

By SUE RAUNHEIM
Ellen Adams, ex-guest editor of
Mademoiselle Magazine, has come,
to the University to receive her
master's degree in English.
Last June, the attractive drama
major from Bloomfield Hills, Mi-
chigan, was chosen to be a guestI
editor of the magazine through
their College Board Contest, one
of 20 women to receive this honor.
She left Northwestern Univer-
sity where she was studying and
went to New York to live at the
Barbizon Hotel for a month.
Expressed Surprise
Miss Adams expressed surprise
at being chosen guest editor and
commented that at the time she
entered the contest she did not
think she had a chance to win.
While at Northwestern, Miss Ad-
ams took a course entitled "Cham-
ber Theater." This consisted in.
the staging of novels and short
stories. At this time, Yul Bryn-
ner, star of "The King and I,"
happened to be studying photo-
graphy there.
She arranged for an interview
with him and wrote up his im-
pressions of the campus. This ar-
ticle won her the editorship of
their August, 1955, issue.
A Year's Experience
When questioned as to her ex-
perience in New York, she re-
marked that "A year's worth of
experience is crammed into one
month. Then different editors in-
terview you to decide whether they
can use you or not."
She believed the experience was
very helpful since she was able
to see a national magazine in op-
eration. She remarked, "This

Fashion shows were a great
source of enjoyment to Miss Ad-
ams. She viewed the new fall
fabric line and on Seventh Ave.
she saw the new coats and dresses
for fall.
Besides these informative trips,
Miss Adams was entertained so-
cially at a cocktail party given by
a New York cosmetic firm. She
also met Edna Chase, editor of
Charm Magazine.
Each guest editor was given the
chance to meet any celebrity she
wanted and Miss Adams chose Ar-
thur Miller, author of "Death of
a Salesman."
After talking with him a while,
she was mainly impressed with his
keen insight. He told her "You
must not only show why a man
does something, but you must also
show why he almost did not do it."
Before leaving New York, a for-
mal dance was given inshonor of
the guest editors. Miss Adams'
stay was completed with a casual
party at the home of one of the
Mademoiselle editors.

MESSIAH
SAT. 8:30 - SUN. 2:30 - DEC. 3-4
Tickets 50c-75c

J

_

CHORAL UNION SERIES
MONDAY 8:30
November 14
HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets $1.50 - $2.00
$2.50 - $3.00 - $3.50
UNIVERSITY
MUSICAL SOCIETY
Burton Tower f

.,

ELLEN ADAMS
gave me an opportunity to see
what I liked and disliked about
the type of work."
While in New York, the guest
editors were shown through the
copy and editing rooms of the
New York Times.

BURO-CATS - Buro-Cat Secre-
tariat committee will meet at 4
p.m. today in the League.
SECRETARIES - There will be
a meeting for all coed secretaries
on campus at 4 p.m. today in the
League.
BASKETBALL CLUB-All stud-
ents interested may attend the se-
cond and final organizational
meeting of the WAA-sponsored
Basketball Club at 4:15 p.m. to-
day in Barbour Gymnasium. No
skill is necessary and students
should come dressed to play. +
* * *
FIELD HOCKEY GAME-Mem-+
bers of the Field Hockey Club will+
compete with Ypsilanti State"

Teacher's College coeds in a game
at 4:30 p.m. today.
S* s
SOPH SCANDALS - There will
be a meeting of the ushers com-
mittee of Soph Scandals at 8 a.m.
tomorrow in Rm. 338 of Mosher
Hall.
* S S
REFRESHMENT COMMITTEE
Soph Scandals. refreshment com-
mittee will have a meeting at 9
a.m. tomorrow in the League.
* * * .
TOURNAMINT CAPTAINS -
Captains in the WAA-sponsored
Basketball Tournament are re-
quested to attend the basketball
clinic at 5:10 p.m. Wednesday in
the Women's Athletic Building.

Belle of the holiday season...
a bouffant b ro cade dress
Whirl thrc
festivitie

ough the
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BOOTS
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