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November 11, 1955 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-11

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER' 11, 1955

THE MICHIGAN .DAlLX

PAGE TM

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1955 TIlE MICHIGAN I)AILV PAGE TI~

"..
1-st li 1 .. .
WITH PHIL DOUGLIS
Daily Sports Editor
MICHIGAN FOOTBALL is on the spot!
An upset-bound horde of Hoosiers from down Indiana way sweep
into Michigan Stadium tomorrow afternoon with the sole aim of
driving the final nail in Michigan's football coffin.
The Hoosiers lost by only seven points to both mighty Michigan
State and Ohio State, and boast one of top backs in the conference in
Milt Campbell, ace quarterback Chick Cichowski, and stellar end Brad
Bomba. They are far stronger than they were last year. No wonder
Michigan is on the spot.
The critical eyes of the football world will be watching Saturday,
for a Michigan loss would send Ann Arbor screaming into oblivion
as far as Big Ten title and Rose Bowl hopes go.
Wolves at the ,Door...
THE LEGIONS of Michigan fans are accustomed to seeing winning
football however. Last week these fans were bitterly disappointed.
Already, a few wolves are howling for Coach Ben Oosterbaan's job.
An angry letter appearing in yesterday's Daily was apparently the
opening salvo in a campaign which a loss tomorrow would bring into
full bloom.
Let us go on record right here and now to say that as both a
football coach and a person, Ben Oosterbaan is beyond question
outstanding. True, his coaching -;.
methods may be a bit subdued for
those fans who thrive on blood
and thunder showmanship. Ooster-
baan is not a showman. He is a;
sincere football technician who.
has produced winners consistently ':
and quietly. His 6-1 record this}
year speaks for itself.
When it comes to football, per-
haps no school in the land has
more Prestige than the University
of Michigan. It is this great tradi-
tion which we believe will stand.
her in good stead out there to-
morrow afternoon. The old axiom
goes "Michigan wins the big ones."
The very presence of what is per-
haps the most underrated foe on
the Wolverine schedule makes this
a "big one."
It is obvious that if the Wolver- BEN OOSTERBAAN
ines are to win tomorrow, they ... record speaks for itself
must present a far more intense desire to win than they had last
week. We think they will.
The Wolverines have reason enough not to treat this as an
ordinary contest. They still remember the bitter 13-9 upset at the
hands of Indiana last year. The derogatory shouts of the Illini
students still ring in their ears-as the huge 25-6 score remained
illuminated long after game in the gathering Champaign dusk.
* * *' *
The Facts A re Blunt...
YET THE FACTS ARE BLUNT. Michigar has won most of its games
by a combination of luck or one or two successful plays. It has
rarely marshalled together enough offensive strength to impress
anybody.
Yesterday, Sports Illustrated magazine added the last epitaph to
last Saturday's debacle, They closed their story on the game with .. .
"and the conference is wondering if Michigan has lucked out for the
last time."
Has Michigan lucked out for the last time?
We'll see for ourselves tomorrow.

Spirits High as GridDrills End

Wolverines
Not Slowed
Injuries
Shouts of "Get Indiana" pierced
the chilly November air at Ferry
Field yesterday as Michigan's grid-
ders wound up their heavy drills!
for the week with a spirited defen-
sive workout.-
Spirits were very high as the
reserves ran Indiana plays againstj
the varsity, which looked sharp, as
time and time again the ball car-
rier got no farther than the line of
scrimmage.
Defensive tactics were designed
to stop Indiana's versatile quarter-
back Gene Cichowski. In addition
to being a deft passer, Cichowski
showed that he is a threat as a
runner by leading the Hoosier
backs in rushing against Ohio
State.
Pass defense was stressed very
heavily by Coach Bennie Ooster-
baan. The Hoosiers have a fine
end in Brad Bomba and the Michi-
gan coach is well aware of the
havoc the Cichowski to Bomba
passing combination could raise
come Saturday.
Fullback Dave Hill, who missed
Wednesday's drills because of a
leg injury, was back in action and
showed no bad effects from it.
Also running well for the second
straight day were halfbacks Terry
Barr and Jim Pace. Both appear
to have shaken the injuries they
suffered in the Iowa game.
According to trainer Jim Hunt,
everyone will be ready for this
Saturday's battle with the Hoos-
iers. Still nursing minor injuries
are guard Jim Fox, fullback Lou
Baldacci and center Jerry Goebel,
but Hunt indicated that none were
serious enough to prevent them
from playing.
Following the defensive work-
out, a short punting drill was held,
featuring several long boots by
Jim Maddock and Baldacci. The
varsity line, playingonsdefense,
drew Oosterbaan's praise as it
dropped back nicely after the
kicks and sprung Tom Hendricks
and George Corey loose for touch-
downs on several occasions.
I-M Football
FIRST PLACE PLAYOFFS
Phi Chi 6, Alpha Chi Sigma Q
Nu Sigma Nu 12, Alpha Omega 0
SECOND PLACE PLAYOFFS
Psi Omega 13, Phi Alpha Delta 6
Phi Alpha Kappa 13, Phi Delta
Phi 0

[GRID SELECTIONS

'NGridders Vividly Recall
Hoosier Upset Last Season

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

GAMES OF THE WEEK
Consensus (59-31-.656) Selections Appear in Capitals
Indiana at MICHIGAN 9. Oregon at STANFORD
ARMY at Penn . 10. OREGON STATE at California
Colgate at SYRACUSE 11. TEXAS A&M at Rice
Illinois at WISCONSIN 12. TEXAS CHRISTIAN at Texas
Iowa at OHIO STATE 13. Washington at UCLA
Minnesota at MICH. STATE 14. WEST VIRGINIA at Pitt
Northwestern at PURDUE 15. YALE at Princeton
NOTRE DAME at N. Carolina,

SELECTIONS
DICK CRAMER (59-31-.656)-Michigan, Army, Syracuse, Wis-
consin, Ohio State, Michigan State, Purdue, Notre Dame, Stanford,
Oregon State, Texas A&M, Texas Christian, UCLA, Pitt, Yale.
* * * *
ALAN EISENBERG (58-32-644)-Michigan, Army, Syracuse,
Wisconsin, Ohio State, Michigan State, Purdue, Notre Dame, Stanford,
Oregon State, Texas A&M, Texas Christian, UCLA, West Virginia,
Princeton.
JOHN HILLYER (56-34--.622)-Michigan, Army, Syracuse, Wis-
consin, Ohio State, Michigan State, Purdue, Notre Dame, Stanford,
Oregon State, Texas A&M, Texas Christian, UCLA, West Virginia,
Yale.
.* * * *
JIM DYGERT (55-35-.611)-Michigan, Army, Syracuse, Wis-
consin, Iowa, Mic~ ,an State, Purdue, Notre Dame, Stanford, Oregon
State, Texas A&M, Texas, UCLA, West Virginia, Yale.
JACK HORWITZ (55-35-.611)-Michigan, Army, Syracuse, Wis-
consin, Ohio State, Michigan State, Purdue, Notre Dame, Stanford,
California, Texas A&M, Texas, UCLA, West Virginia, Princeton.
* * * *
PHIL DOUGLIS (54-36-.600)-Michigan, Army, Syracuse, Illi-
nois, Iowa, Minnesota, Purdue, Notre Dame, Stanford, California,
Texas A&M, Texas, UCLA, Pitt, Yale.
* * . *
DAVE BAAD (53-37-.589) -Michigan, Army. Colgate, Wisconsin,
Iowa, Michigan State, Purdue, Notre Dame, Stanford, Oregon State,
Texas A&M, Texas, UCLA, Pitt, Yale.
DAVE GREY (52-38-.578)-Michigan, Army, Syracuse, Wisconsin,
Ohio State, Michigan State, Purdue, Notre Dame,. Stanford, Oregon
State, Texas A&M, Texas Christian, UCLA, Pitt, Yale.
DAVE RORABACHER (52-38-.578)-Michigan, Army, Colgate,
Wisconsin, Ohio State, Michigan State, Purdue, Notre Dame, Stanford,
Oregon State, Texas A&M, Texas Christian, UCLA, West Virginia,
Princeton.
JIM BAAD (51-39-.567)-Michigan, Army, Syracuse, Wisconsin,
Ohio State, Michigan State, Purdue, Notre Dame, Stanford, Oregon
State, Texas A&M, Texas Christian, UCLA, West Virginia, Princeton.
* * * *
STEVE HEILPERN (51-39-.567)-Michigan, Army, Syracuse,
Wisconsin, Ohio State, Michigan State, Purdue, Notre Dame, Stanford,
California, Texas A&M, Texas Christian, UCLA, West Virginia, Yale.

By JOHN HILLYER
There have been several haunt-
ing figures in Michigan's football
history.
Of course, there was the origi-
nal ghost, the "Galloping Ghost"
himself-Red Grange. In 1953 it
was Minnesota's Paul Giel who
put on a one-man show to pin
backtheears of a favored Wol-
verine crew.
And last year-October 30, 1954,
to be exact-another ghostly fig-
ure left an indelible impression on
the minds of a stunned Michigan
eleven.
His name is Florian Helinski, a
"pretty good quarterback" who
played like an immortal that day.
Unforgettable Score
The score, as every man on this
year's Michigan squad could tell
you as quickly as his own name,
was 13-9, in favor of an Indiana
football squad which was previous-
ly winless in three Conference
games.
The Wolverines jumped' off to
a 7-0 edge, which apparently dis-
turbed Mr. Helinski to extremes.
' Helinski Strikes
Then, with deadly precision,
Helinski hit Don Domenic with
a 20-yard pass on fourth down to
the Michigan four. Four plays

later, Helinski took the ball over
himself from inches out.
A few minutes later, the Hoos-
iers took a lead that was never to
be bested. Sixty-seven yards were
reeled off, 55 of which were cov-
ered by Helinski passes.
Time and time again, the luck-k
less Wolverines penetratedito
within 25 yards of paydirt. Time
and time again, the Hoosiers
stiffened and slammed the door.
Thus, the final score-13-9-
still rings in the ears of the men
who play football for Michigan.
It is a score whichi they will
perhaps never forget.
And if they remember it this
weekend . . . Ipdiana, beware!
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By DAVE RORABACHER
"You realize what a privilege it
is to go to Michigan when you go
away and see other schools."
Such was the praise of John
Morrow, Michigan's rugged senior
tackle, who has the distinction of
being one of the few two-year
lettermen on the squad.
"It is a privilege to represent
the University," he continued. "On
the whole student support is pretty
good. The students here have as
much spirit as at any school but
the spirit here is more mature
and more critical than most. There
is less of the rah-rah.
"This is probably due to the
large number of foreign and gradu-,
ate students," he concluded.
Morrow is undoubtedly more

mature than most football players.
Head coach Ben Oosterbaan lauded
him as "a very concientious play-
er.'"
A local product, Morrow attend-
ed Ann Arbor High School for
three years where he played ball
under the tutelage of Hank Fonde.
It was during his years there that
the Pioneers began to establish
Fonde's fabulous record.
After graduation from Ann Ar-
bor he attended Staunton Military
Academy in Virginia for a year on
a scholarship. While there he was
instrumental in establishing the
academy as the Virginia state grid
champions.
Upon returning to the local
scene, Morrow enrolled in the Uni-
versity and immediately went out

for football. The Wolverine men-
tors soon switched him from his
regular tackle position to the un-
familiar center spot.
It was in this capacity that he
served through his sophomore
year when he was once again
switched to tackle.
Morrow expresses no sentiments
of preference for either position
nor does he list offensive or de-
fensive playing as preferred. "It
is a lot of fun to make a tackle,"
he explains. "But it also feel great
to make a good block."
As to why Michigan lost to Illi-
nois last weekend, Morrow was
uncertain. "Being away from home
is a disadvantage," was his only
comment. As for Indiana-that
will have to wait until tomorrow.

98

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When the Big Game is done
And your home-team has won...
To have the most fun-have a CAMEL!
It's a psychological fact:
Pleasure helps your disposition.
If you're a smoker, remember
- more people get more
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No other cigarette is so
rch-tasting, yet so mild!

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