100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 04, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

sm

THE MCMGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1955

S I X H E I C H G A N A I L F R D A Y N O V M D I R 4 1 9 5

ANN ARBOR'S MOST LISTENED-TO ORCHESTRA
Ann Arbor's Most Listened-to Orchestra
ARE YOU ELIGIBLE?

cj Ii"

Illiti

Resume

Colorful

Series

.11

Grange's Running Tops List
Of Thrills in Long Rivalry

Dancing Friday and Saturday Nights

The Rainbow Combo
Featuring
lovely MARY LOU

cK.Uu5.

You must be 21
Members
and Guests only

HALL RENTALS & BANQUETS 51=111

-11

By appointment purveyors of soap to the late King George VI, Yardley & Co., Ltd., London

I

PROBABLY THE GREATEST individual pbrformance in college
football history was turned in by Illinois' great halfback, Red
Grange, in the 1924 game against the Wolverines. In the first
ten minutes of play, Grange scored four touchdowns, as the
Illini beat Michigan, 39-14.
The Jacket You'll Live in
COMFORTA BLY!

By JOHN HILLYER
Michigan has faced Illinois 40
times on the gridiron.
The Wolverines have won 26 of
these games, while the Illini have
walked off with victory on the
other 14 occasions.
All of which proves nothing, as
could be demonstrated this Satur-
day at Champaign before a parti-
san Dad's Day crowd at Memorial
Stadium.
It was demonstrated on an over-
cast, dreary afternoon in the fall
of 1924 at Champaign. This was
the setting for the tenth meeting
of the two Big Ten powers. Michi-
gan had won seven of the first
nine battles.
The clash was the Western Con-
ference opener for the two mighty
elevens, both of which were rated
as top choices for the title. The
game itself was rated practically
even.
Forgotten Factor
One factor wasn't taken into
consideration. That factor was a
spunky, slightly-built redhead who,
during his high school day in
Wheaton, Ill., delivered huge
blocks of ice to his various cus-
tomers to stay in shape for~ track.
That factor was a relatively
undersized youngster named Har-
old Grange, who went out on the
first day of freshman football at
Illinois, took one look at the mam-
moth linemen who were hurtling
themselves at the helpless backs
and crashing them to the, earth,
and decided to call the .whole
thing off, only to be driven back
by his fraternity brothers with
the threat of a paddling if he
didn't at least give it a try.
Just how much of a. factor Mr.
Grange was that day was recorded
the next day in an account of the
contest by perhaps the greatest
sportswriter of all time-Grant-
land Rice.
"I saw a Ghost .. . a Galloping
Ghost . . . " began Rice, still not
recovered from the attack of dis-
belief suffered by all assembled at
Champaign on Oct. 18, 1924. And
the Ghost was to~ haunt many
more victims after his one-man
show against Michigan.
Four touchdowns in the first 10
minutes of play-that's all Red
Grange managed to do against
Michigan in that period of time-
although he raced for another and
passed for still another in Illinois'
39-14 scalping of the Wolverines.

It is still hailed as the greatest
individual performance in the his-
tory of college football, and is re-
called whenever the colorful Mich-
igan-Illinois series is renewed.
Other Thrills
But there were other thrills-
other Saturdays of memorable
football - many of them happy
Sautrdays in Ann Arbor.
There was the 1947 battle. That
year - 1947 - saw Michigan. roll
through a six-game Big Ten'cam-
paign with nary a loss or tie. It is
said by many that this was the
greatest Michigan team of them
all.
Once again, the scene was Me-
morial Stadium on the Illinois
campus, where over 71,000 Home-
coming fans gathered to demand
as one that the finest team in the
nation be cut down to size.
And they almost got their wish.
Late in the first quarter, the
Wolverines' great All-American
from Bloomington, Ill., Bump Elli-
ott, took a punt on his own 26-yard
line and scooted behind great
blocking for the game's first score.
But Ray Eliot's battlers had not
yet begun to'fight.
Their big fullback, Russ Steger,'
broke over right guard soon after
the ensuing kickoff, and galloped
53 yards to the Michigan 16. Sec-
onds later, Steger lunged over from
the one to make it 7-7, and Me-
morial Stadium was an ocean of
hysteria.
'M' Strikes Back
Not to be outdone, however, Fritz
Crisler's power boys struck again
right after Illinois kicked off. Bob'
Chappuis, with the ball on his own
21, fired a perfect pass to Elliott,
who took it on the Illinois 44 and
.romped to the four. Then little
Hank Fonde took the pigskin off
the reverse and dove for the win-
ning score.
"Automatic" Jim Brieske con-
verted, to make the final score
read Michigan 14, Illinois 7, as
the Wolverines dug in twice, in the
second half to halt Illini thrusts.
There have been other thrilling
chapters in this distinguished
rivalry, perhaps too numerous to
mention.
There is still one factor not yet
mentioned.
Oosterbaan-coached Michigan
teams have lost four of seven times
to Illinois.
So there's at least one score to
settle.

GRID SELECTONS
GAMES OF THE WEEK
Consensus (51-24-.680) Selections Appear in Capitals
1. MICHIGAN at Illinois
2. ARMY at Yale
3. Baylor at TEXAS
4. Duke at NAVY
5. Indiana at OHIO STATE
6. Louisiana State at MARYLAND
7. MICHIGAN STATE at Purdue
8. Minnesota at IOWA
9. PRINCETON at Harvard
10. Southern Methodist at TEXAS A&M
11. Stanford at SOUTHERN CAL
12. SYRACUSE at Penn State
13. Utah at COLORADO
14. WASHINGTON at California
15. WISCONSIN at Northwestern
* * * *
SELECTIONS
DICK QRAMER (50-25--.667)-Michigan, Army, Texas, Navy,
Ohio State, Maryland, Michigan State, Iowa, Princeton, Texas A&M,
Southern Cal., Penn State, Colorado, Washington, Wisconsin.
ALAN EISENBERG (50-25-.667)-Michigan, Army, Texas, Navy,
Ohio State, Maryland, Michigan State, Iowa, Princeton, Texas A&M,
Southern Cal., Syracuse, Colorado, Washington, Wisconsin.
* * * * +
JIM DYGERT (49-26-.653)--Michigan, Army, Texas, Navy, Ohio
State, Maryland, Michigan State, Minnesota, Princeton, Southern
Methodist, Southern Cal., Syracuse, Colorado, Washington, Wisconsin.
JOHN HILLYER (49-26-.653)-Michigan, Army, Texas, Navy,
Ohio State, Maryland, Purdue, Iowa, Princeton, Texas A&M, Southern
Cal., Syracuse, Colorado, Washington, Wisconsin.
* * * *
JACK HORWITZ (48-27-.640)-Michigan, Army, Texas, Navy,
Ohio State, Maryland, Michigan State, Iowa, Princeton, Southern
Methodist, Southern Cal., Syracuse, Colorado, Washington, Wisconsin.
PHIL DOUGLIS (47-28-.627)-Michigan, Army, Texas, Navy,
Ohio State, Maryland, Purdue, Iowa, Princeton, Texas A&M; Southern
Cal., Syracuse, Colorado, Washington, Wisconsin.
* * * * *
DAVE BAAD (46-29-.613)-Michigan, Army, Texas, Navy, Ohio
State, Maryland, Purdue, Iowa, Princeton, Texas A&M, Southern Cal.,
Syracuse, Colorado, Washington, Wisconsin.
STEVE HEILPERN (46-29-.613)-Michigan, Army, Texas, Navy,
Ohio State, Maryland, Michigan State, Minnesota, Princeton, Southern
Methodist, Southern Cal., Syracuse, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin.
* * * *
JIM BAAD (45-30-.600)-Michigan, Army, Texas, Navy, Ohio
State, Maryland, Michigan State, Iowa, Princeton, Southern Methodist,
Southern Cal., Syracuse, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin.
- DAVE GREY (45-30-.600)-Michigan, Army, Texas, Navy, Ohio
State, Maryland, Purdue, Iowa, Princeton, Texas- A&M, Stanford,
Syracuse, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin.
* * * *
DAVE RORABACHER (44-31-.587)-Michigan, Army, Texas,
Navy, Ohio State, Maryland, Michigan State, Iowa, Princeton, Texan
A&M, Southern Cal., Syracuse, Colorado, Washington, Wisconsin.
PassinGame Dominates
Intramural Football Action

Yardley brings you
good grooming in a bottle-
London style
From London, the world's center of fashions for men, comes
Yardley After Shaving Lotion. It softens and braces the
skin in wondrous style. It helps.to heal inadvertent nicks.
It counteracts skin dryness caused by hard water shaving.
It was created for those who value good grooming. At your
campus store, $1.10 and $1.50 plus tax. Makers and dis-
tributors for U. S. A., Yardley of London, Inc., New York.
Read Daily Classifieds
...* *

WEEK4NDER,
* Finest virgin wool suede.
Metal insulated Milium
satin lining.
Wide shoulders ...,
straight up collar.
* 100% wool worsted knit
trim.
You'll want to wear the
"Week-Ender" all week
long. It's the one lacket.
that seems to automati-
cally vary its insulation
to match theweather ...
always comfortable,
always distinctive.
TICE & WREN

I-M Volleyball

;::

LP, Ide6

Sigma Nu 4, Phi Sigma Kappa 1
Tau Delta Phi 4, Sigma Phi 2
Lambda Chi Alpha 5, Psi Upsi-
lon 1
Theta Chi 5, Kappa Sigma 1
Delta Tau Delta over Phi Kap-
pa Sigma (forfeit)
Theta Xi 4, Beta Theta Pi 2
Alpha Tau Omega 4, Alpha Del-
ta Phi 2
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 6, Tri-
angle 0
Phi Sigma Delta 6, Alpha Sigma
Phi 0

o, Men

Phi Kappa Tau 4, Theta Delta
Chi 2
Pi Lambda Phi 5, Zeta Psi 1
Zeta Beta Tau 6, Trigon 0
Sigma Alpha Mu over Delta
Kappa Epsilon (forfeit)
Psychology 5, English 1
Education 6, Astronomy 0
Air Science 3, Psychology B 3
Physical Education Majors 6,
Sociology 0
Natural Resources over Econo-
mics (forfeit)

By JACK STOVALL
Michigan's victory over Iowa via
the air lanes appears to have ef-
fected the attacks of a majority
of the intramural football teams,
as 16 of 18 touchdowns scored in
six games yesterday were by means
of the passing game.
In social fraternity action, Kap-
pa Sigma, led by Frank Swanson,
routed Phi Epsilon Phi, 25-0.

1107 S. University - Across from Ann Arbor Bank

-1

EGYPTIAN MUSIC BOXQ
Inlaid Ivory or Leather
"Home Sweet Home
"Moulin Rouge"
INDIA rE SHOP
550 MAYNARD STREET -

Swanson passed to John Moore
and Haven Doane for two tallies
and scored on a 30-yard run. Glen
Thomet scored for Kappa Sigma
on a 50-yard punt return.
In the other social fraternity
game, Delta Sigma Phi dropped
Delta Chi, 14-0, as Harvey John-
son passed for two counters, one
to Bob Johnson, the other to Bud
Osmun.the conversion were made
by Osmun and Dick Hoek.
In professional fraternity con-
tests, in the closest game of the
afternoon, Psi Omega squeezed by
Phi Rho Sigma, 8-6. A hard-charg-
ing Psi Omega line threw Charles
Hamilton to the ground in his own
end zone for two points early in
the first half. Psi Omega's touch-
down was scored on a 20-yard
aerial from Larry Kinstle to speedy
Dick Wheeler. Charles Hamilton
threw to Jack Ison for Phi Rho
Sigma's tally.
Alpha Omega Wins
Alpha Omega's Milt Siegel pas-
sed for three touchdowns as he
led his team to victory over Alpha
Kappa Psi, 20-13. Tom Strang
threw for two TD's for the losers.
Phi Alpha Kappa needed only
one play to defeat Alpha Kappa
Kappa, 6-0. On the first play of
the game, Roger Postmus threw
to Dewy Heetderks for the lone
touchdown.
Phi Chi defeated Delta Theta
Phi, 14-12, on Bill Lukash's pas-
sing ability. Lukash passed for all
14 points for Phi Chi. It was also
a one-man passing game for Delta
Theta Phi as Clarence Dwitten-
strom threw for his team's two
touchdowns.

"-'V.::.. <
K -
There are two important reasons why the Martin
Star is rising...and why your career can rise along
with it:
...The finest aircraft plant, engineering, electronic,
nuclear physics and research facilities on the eastern
seaboard.
.An entirely new management concept in Ad-
vanced Design and weapons systems development,
embracing creative engineering ranging upward
from nuclear powered aircraft to anti-gravity re-
search and tomorrow's satellite vehicle.
There are exceptional opportunities for dynamic

Fine Ouality
Suburban Coals
of
'5' WOOL and CASHMERE
ti 424.95 up
Grey, Light Tan,
Charcoal Grey
AA

Especially
for YOU-
DESIGNED HAIR STYLES
IV 4( & vfa6be
715 N. University

L

UI

f1I A I V "4%1c

y I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan