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October 25, 1955 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-10-25

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2S, 1955

TUESDAY. OCTOBER 2~. 1955

I,

CBOATS TO SGC:

pane Hall Director
eads Varied Life

Prize Winning Geneticist
Fears Heredity Havoc

BOB

Dr. Herman J. Muller
Warns Against 'Utopia

of Indiana U.
of Inferiority'

MARSHALL

4,

By CAROL PRINS
An avid interest in anything
from SGC to sailing a C-boat
characterizes peppy, brown-eyed
Georgianna McLean, director of
student activities at Lane Hall.
Miss McLean claims residence
in at least five states but really
considers Columbus, Ohio, as her
home. The twenty-three year old
political science major began her
undergraduate work at Macalest-
er College in Minnesota, later
transferring to the University of
Wisconsin for a summer of studies.
Studied At Sorbonne
Continuing her education at the
Sorbonne, Miss McLean worked
on th~e European Defense Council
planning in its early stages.
Pharmacist's
To Convene
This year's Annual Pharmacy
Lectures will be held tomorrow in
Rackham.
With registration beginning at
9:30 a.m., the morning session will
open at 10:30 a.m. in Rackham
Amphitheater. Prof. Richard A.
Deno of the pharmacognosy de-
partment will speak on "The Mich-
igan Pharmacy Study," and Prof.
Roscoe W. Cavell of the psychiatry
department will talk about "Men-
tal Health."
Beginning at 1:30 p.m. in the
Rackham Amphitheater, the after-
noon session will feature talks on
"Modern Gerontology," by Prof.
Otto J. Mallery of the internal
medicine department, and "Pro-
moting Professional Pharmacy,"
by Robert E. Abrams, Executive
Secretary of the American College
of Apothecaries."
Also presented in the afternoon
session will be a discussion of "The
Responsibilities of the Pharmacist
to His Profession," by Robert J.
Gillespie, member of the Michigan
State Board of Pharmacy, and Al-
bert R. Pisa, Chairman of the
Michigan State Pharmaceutical
Association Committee on Phar-
macy Manpower Needs, and Stan-
ley J. Byington, President-Elect of
the MSPA.
Concluding the day of lectures
will be a dinner at 6:30 p.m. at
the League, with Prof. Henry
Gomberg, assistant director of the
Phoenix Project, speaking on, "The
Prospects of Peacetime Uses of
Atomic Energy."

Now working on the thesis for
her master's degree at Ohio State
University, Miss McLean hopes to
enter divinity school in September
of 1956.
Most of Miss McLean's work as
student director is divided be-
tween work in the area of Lane
Hall-University Relations and in
the World University Service. The
WUS is an international student
organization representing thirty-
eight nations. Aiding internation-
al education and fund-raising are
its main projects. It is sponsored
by the Protestant, Catholic and
Jewish faith groups and the Na-
tional Students Association.
SGC of Vital Interest
The work of the Student Gov-
ernment Council is of vital in-
terest to the student director. She
believes that the group should be
an action organization w.which
handles all campus problems.
"Lots of areas can be handled by
a group of mature student lead-
ers," Miss McLean pointed out.

-Daily-Glenn Kopp
GEORGIANNA McLEAN
Directs student activities at Lane Hall

"For example, the action being
taken at the present time on de-
ferred rushing is a good start in
making the student government
group a responsible and respected
organization on campus."

Spoek Claims Modern Parents
Not Educated in Child Care

NEW YORK (P)-The hero of
the American nursery, Dr. Benja-
min Spock, says the trouble with
parents is they are not educated-_-
to be parents, that is.
"Academic education instills in
young women (and men too) that
a career is more important than a
family," the widely known peria-
trician says. "Young people grad-
uate with an absorbing philosophy
that all good is accomplished out-
'side the home."
The author of the perennial best
seller "Baby and Child Care" sug-
gested in an interview:
"Why not connect nursery
schools with high schools and col-
leges, making students aware of
their primary role in life and
getting them in the mood for it by
everyday contact with children?
As it is now the spirit of education
tends to divorce them from the
idea."
Dr. Spock, a visiting professor
at Western Reserve University,
Cleveland, Ohio, has just started
a Sunday afternoon TV program
for mothers (NBC 3-3:30). A tall,
pleasant, bespectacled man, he
says the joy of life should be in
doing things - not just reading
about them.

"All knowledge," he contends,
"gets in the way of easy doing, one
reason why it is difficult for a
nurse, pediatrician or psychologist
to become an easy-going parent.
Dr. Spock maintains there is no
substitute for motherly love in
the home and adds:
"The working mother might find
excuses for maintaining a career-
more money, bigger house and car,
private schools for the youngsters
-all things her children can do
without in exchange for her devo-
tion at home. But these are not
the real reasons she works any-
way. They've been schooled to
work and it is emotionally essen-
tial to them."
"Easy does it" should be the
rule of thumb in child-bearing,
says the doctor, "But Americans
cannot accept child-raising tradi-
tions the way Europeans do. We
see-saw our beliefs because there
are so many theories, shifts and
technical advances that we are
thrown off balance.' We rely on
books, and when the books change
we go along."
It is still important to thwart
spoiling, Spock says, and many
working mothers spoil because
they have a feeling of guilt.
Old directories will be picked up
when the new ones are delivered.

Miss McLean expressed the hope
that Lane Hall and the Student
Religious Association could fur-
ther its activities and become a
campus group of major import-
ance like SGC. She indicated a
proposed change inthe structure
of the SRA similar to the change
of the Student Legislature to SGC
as an incentative in increasing
the importance of the SRA and
Lane Hall.,'
Changes in the structure are
hoped to promote participation in
activities of the organization and
classify its functions and respons-
ibilities. Miss McLean men'tioned
the importance of the role of re-
ligion in the state university.
"To often religion is concerned
with one particular church or de-
nomination and not enough em-
phasis is put on a whole under-
standing of religious life."

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (IP)-Dr.-
Hermann J. Muller, Indiana Uni-
versity"s Nobel Prize-winning gen-
ticist, says we're headed for a
"Utopia of inferiority" in which
everyone will spend his leisure time
nursing his ailments.
In an article in Scientific Amer-
ican, Dr. Muller said the threat to
future generations from H-bomb
fallout may be no greater than the
heredity dangers from some other
"hazards added by civilization."
"Those who are relatively heav-
ily loaded with genetic defects
would consider it their obligation
... to refrain from transmitting
their genes, except when they also
possessed genes of such unusual
value that the gain for the de-
scendants was likely to outweight
the loss," Dr. Muller said.
Dr. "Muller noted that modern
medicine and technology keep
alive many persons who once would
have died of inherited defects be-
fore they became old enough to
become parents.
"It is probably a considerable
understatement to say that half
of the detrimental genes, which
under primitive conditions would
havemet genetic extinction, today
survive and are passed on," he
said.
Dr. Muller was one of the first
Telephone Books
To Be Distributed
Distribution of new telephone
directories for the Ann Arbor area
will begin November 2. Approxi-
mately 30,000 copies will be given
out in the city proper. Dexter,
Chelsea, Whitmore Lake, and
Manchester have been alloted
about 5,800 copies.

scientists to warn of the dangers
to future generations from fallout
of atomic weapons, but he said:
"If the dead of the misuse of
nuclear energy awakens mankind
not only to the gentic dangers
confrinting him but also to the
gentic opportunities, then this will
have been the greatest peacetime
benefit that radioactivity could
bestow upon us."

HAS
THE

AT
BOB MARSHALL'S.

i

BOB MARSHALL'S BOOK SHOP is open approximately 300 days
a year. On every one of those 300 days you will find a-sale in
'progress-even during the Christmas gift season and text time.
o Most of the books on sale at BOB MARSHALL'S are not "cats and dogs"
which have kicked around the store for years . . . but specially-purchased
publishers remainders and overstocks. These overstock and odd lots bar-
gains are all new books and at handsome price reductions. We buy with
great care and never on a job-lot basis. Thus at all times you can pick from
the cream of all current remainder offerings from both American and British

EVERY DAY
IS SALE DAY

BARGAINS ...

-

nM-

BUY THE BEST ... BUY BALFOUR

We are headquarters in Ann Arbor for gifts
and novelties of a Michigan nature. Seal items, fra-
ternity sorority crested items, Knitwear, ceramics,
wood paddles, stationery, Jewelry, Gifts, Novelties,
Trophies and Awards.

sources.

L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY

Ii

o Because we are the largest purchaser of remainders in Michigan
* . . because we maintain continual contact in this country and
abroad with every conceivable source of supply . . . because we
seek to match the quality of our new book stock with a compar-
able sales stock . . . for these reasons you ALWAYS will find a
darned good sale in progress at BOB MARSHALL'S.

1 1321 South University

Bob Carlson, Manager

Public XRay Truck to Serve
Ann Arbor and Vicinity

IL

l

Public X-ray service is now
available to Ann Arbor residents
for the first time in five years.
The first chest X-rays were taqt-
en in a State Health Department
truck containing X-ray equipment
shortly after 1 p.m. yesterday.
The truck will be located at the
corner of Main and Ann streets
until Nov. 1.
The blue and yellow truck is
scheduled to be in Ann Arbor for
18 days.
Health officials expect to dis-
cover 11 cases of suspected TB,
11 suspected instances of cancer
and eight cases of heart disease
among each 1,000 X-ray plates
returned to Lansing.
Two of the 11 suspected tuber-
culosis cases will prove to be ac-
tive.
Since the state owned and op-
erated trucks were first employed
two weeks ago over 8,000 persons
have been X-rayed.
The majority of those already
- - - - - - - -

y

11

serviced were industrial plant
workers throughout Washtenaw
county.
Health Educator Howard G.
Hilton said, "It is the families,
friends and neighbors of these
workers w eare trying to get to
take part in the program now."
Hilton hoped that the industrial
phase would be completed by to-
night.
Hilton added, "Everyone who
has not had a chest X-ray during
the past six months should find
time to take advantage of this
survey.
"The entire process from regis-
tration to X-ray, takes less than
five minutes."
The University will have a unit,
similar to the one now in Ann
Arbor, available at the Health
Service, Nov. 9 to 15.
Surveys will also be made in the
neighboring cities of East Ann
Arbor, Ypsilanti, Dexter, Whitmore
Lake, Salem, and Willow Village.

HERE'S THE EQUIVALENT OF
33A DISCOUNT
This is NOT a misleading headline.., unlike some ads
we've read.

Right now, today, there are six large
tables loaded with real bargains in.
choice overstock and remainder titles
-prices begin at 49c, 3 for one buck.

I

This is for real . .. so read on

I

R. R. Bowker Company, publishers to the book and
library trade, have just issued their Fall, 1955 catalog
of PAPER BOUND BOOKS IN PRINT
This edition has 117 pages, contains an alphabetical
listing by author of over 4500 paper bound titles cur.
rently available plus a selective subject listing. Titles
from 42 publishers are included! Thus this fine refer.
ence tool is invaluable for every:
student
teacher
book buyer
scholar
library-builder
bargain-hunter
etc., etc., etc.

and

to call this to your attention more cogently, more forcefully,
more flamboyently, more poignantly . . . here is a special,
Bob-Marshall-type, money-saving, piggy-bank-raiding, sweet-

ness-and-light COUPON:

--

. .

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS
Monsanto Chemical Company
WIL L INTERVIEW ON CAMPUS
HARRY O. HEUNER, REPRESENTATIVE
THURSDAY & FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27 & 28

- - - ----- - ----
-f
THIS COUPON IS WORTH 25c IN TRADE
Today only, October 25, this coupon is worth 25c in trade on any
I purchase of any book from our six big sales tables .. , from 49c up. 1
cash only, I to customer.I
Two Bits--Use It Just Like Money-Oct. 25
i - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- -

'ml

"L

PAPER BOUND BOOKS IN PRINT - FALL, 1955 sells
for one dollar at our store and in stores everywhere.
THIS WEEK ONLY
a free ---- absolutely scot-free - copy of this invaluable $1.00 reference
book with every cash purchase of $3.00 or more!!!
thus when you spend three bucks you get this most useful one buck
book free ... the equivalent of 33 1/3%V0 discount.
THIS WEEK ONLY
Memo to our charge customers:
....,., .,.,......s _1 2 nn .,.

OB

11

SN

L

'S

IA

BOB

MARSHALL

BOO

.SHOP

.l



® iU

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