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October 25, 1955 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-10-25

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T'UESD Y* OCTOBER 25,1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILL Y

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY. OCTOBER 25, 1955 THE MICHIGAN hAlEY PAGE THREE

Rating Drops

to

Third

in AP Grid Poll

It's Clear Cut that the
Crew Cut is the Mode
" FLATTOPS
" CREWS
" PRINCETONIANS
" COLLEGIANS
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

=l,
NOTES IN THE MARGIN
by alan eisenberg
Daily Associate Sports Editor r'

.

4

Maryland, Oklahoma Gain
Top Ranking; Navy Fourth

THOUGH THE Wolverines fell from first to third place in this
week's Associated Press poll there are many reasons why Michigan
fans can be happy this morning.
Most heartening is the r'evitalized offensive attack. After the
initial quarter, Michigan dominated the game almost completely.
This was most evident in the third quarter when Minnesota had the
ball only three times - and was forced to punt on each occasion. For
the first time this season the Wolverines were able to consistently
move the ball. The winning touchdown came after a drive of 48
yards in ten plays; the first score resulted after Michigan had
marched 60 yards in only 6 plays.
A New Star for Michigan...
THEN THERE was the fine play of quarterback Jim Van Pelt.
Substituting for the injured Jim Maddock, the sophomore dis-
played the coolness of a veteran. He led the team so well that he
may have earned himself a starting berth. Van Pelt completed five
of 11 passes, good for one touchdown and 76 yards. He also kicked
the extra point which supplied the victory.
But Van Pelt was not the only one who turned in an outstanding
performance. 'Terry Barr accounted for 46 yards on the ground,
scored the first touchdown, and blocked Minnesota's try for the
extra point. Reliable Tony Branoff was a threat all day as he picked
up 57 yards rushing. Tom Maentz had a wonderful day: the big end
snared Van Pelt's touchdown pass and three others for a total of 57
yards.
Another factor in Michigan's one-point victory was its poise.
The Wolverines, instead of cracking when behind by 13 points,
increased the pressure. They
forced the Gophers to make errors
and then were able to capitalize on
the mistakes. It is only a very good
team than can come from behind
as Michigan did last Saturday.f
After a shaky start, the Maize
and Blue's defense performed
more than creditably. Minnesota
had seven first downs - 12 less
than the Maize and Blue - and,
could gain only 44 yards on the
ground in the second half.F
To add further joy in the Michi-
gan camp, no serious injuries
resulted at Minneapolis. Jim Bates
and Mike Rotunno are still havingx
trouble with their legs but they x
will be ready come game-time this
weekend.
When Ron Kramer will return to
the lineup could become the-
favorite guessing game on they
campus. No one seems to know%
when the star end will return to JIM VAN PELT
action.
The Unmentioned Subject...
THE BIG TEN championship and the Pasadena trip that goes with
it, is a subject that no one talks about at Ferry Field. Be that
as it may . . . but things are looking pretty good for the Wolverines
at the moment. Ohio State, sporting a 26-12 win over Wisconsin,
and Michigan are the only two unbeaten teams in the conference.
Since the Buckeyes can not make a return trip to the West Coast
and' . . well, as I said, things are looking pretty good for the
Wolverines.
Barr is the leading ground gainer for the first five games with
179 yards in 38 attempts, an average of 4.7 per carry. Branoff is
the workhorse of the team - 46 rushes - for 116 yards. Jim Pace
sports the best average-5.3-with 112 yards on 21 carries.
Kramer still leads the team in scoring with 25 points on three
touchdowns and eight conversions. Barr is one point behind with
four tallies.
In the passing department, Maddock has 134 yards to his credit
while Van Pelt has tossed for 125 yards. Maddock has completed
seven of 23 while Van Pelt has succeeded in eight of 16 attempts.
Branoff heads the kickers with an average of 44 yards per punt.
Kramer is fourthon the squad with 365 yards in ten boots.
A statistic that means nothing: Michigan has lost the flip-of-the-
coin in all but the Minnesota game.
Former Ring Greats Honored
NEW YORK W)--Ten former ring greats, including Gene
Tunney, Mickey Walker, Benny Leonard and Harry Greb, have
been elected to boxing's Hall of Fame. The announcement was
made Monday at the dedication ceremony for the Hall of Fame
at the Ring magazine offices. Other named were Sam Langford,
the Boston Tar baby, who fought from 1902 to 1923; former
featherweight champions Terry McGovern and Abe Attell and
Barbtados Joe Walcott, onetime welterweight king. These four
were voted in by the old timers' committee of 20.

CALM AND COOL-HEADED when the pressure's on, it took
Jim Maddock (26) just one game to demonstrate his value to
the Wolverine grid squad.

By The Associated Press
Maryland and Oklahoma. dis-
playing the kind of awesome foot-
ball power that impresses the ex-
perts, moved to the top of the na-
tional rankings Monday while
Michigan tumbled to third place.
Maryland's Terrapins, unbeaten
kingpins of the Atlantic Coast
Conference, humbled Syracuse, the
team that had put the crusher on
Army the week before, by a con-
vincing 34-13 score Saturday.
Oklahoma, facing its m o s t
dangerous Big Seven rival, over-
came a bad start to bury Colo-
rado 56-21.
Michigan Overshadowed
These two overwhelming victor-
ies overshadowed the performance
of Michigan, the pacesetter for the
past two weeks, but they evidently
left some uncertainty in the minds
of the sports writers and broad-
casters participating in the week-
ly Associated Press ranking poll.
JIM MADDOCK
the difficulty of diagnosing the
other team's defense. "It's very
hard, once you get in a game, to
gain the proper perspective.", he
points out. "Very few quarter-
backs can correctly interpret the
defensive setup every time."
One of Maddock's pet peeves is
the popular conception that foot-
ball players are mere uneducated
hunks of muscle. "Everybody on
the team loves to play football,"
he emphasizes, "but we realize
that it's not the most important
thing in life.

-I

Officials Needed
All men interested in offici-
ating intramural volleyball
games should call the IM
building and leave your name
and phone number immediate-
ly. A meeting will be held
Thursday afternoon at 4 o'clock
in the IM building. Officials

11

Out of 187 voters, 62 cast their
first place ballots in favor of
Maryland and 53 named Oklahoma
first. And when the results were
all tallied on the usual 10-9-8 etc.
basis, Maryland was head 1,599 to
1,569 for the Sooners.
Michigan, 14-13 winners over
Minnesota, received only 39 first
place votes and 1,433 points.

13-2 Entry
Winner in
'Grid Picks'
John Sloan, of 325 Adams House,
West Quad, posted a 13-2 record
in last week's "Grid Picks" contest
to win two free theater tickets.
Sloan missed only on the Stan-
ford-Washington tie and the Duke-
Pitt game. Over twenty entries
had 12-3 won-lost marks.
Entries for this week's contest
must reach The Daily no later
than 5 p.m. Thursday. Mail your
selections to "Grid Picks," Michi-
gan Daily, Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, or bring them in person to
the main desk on the second floor
of the Student Publications Build-
ing.
This week's games:
1. Iowa at Michigan
2. Auburn at Tulane
3. California at UCLA
4. Colgate at Army
5. Dartmouth at Yale
6. Duke at Georgia Tech
7. Miami at Pitt
8. MichiganState at Wisconsin
9. Navy at Notre Dame
10. Northwestern at Ohio State
11. Purdue at Illinois
12. Rice at Kentucky
13. Southern Cal. at Minnesota
14. Texas at Southern Methodist
15. Texas Christian at Baylor
Baylor Line Out"
Five Baylor football players,
including the entire center of
the line, were kicked off the
team for breaking training
rules. Jim Taylor, Dan Miller,
Dugan Pearce, Jimmy Daven-
port, and Paul Carver are still
technically in Baylor but their
athletic scholarships have been
taken up and they are subject
to expulsion.

r

r----

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B*H*o *

will receive pay for this work.
The top teams with won-lost
records and first place votes in
parentheses:
Team W L W Tot.
1. Maryland 6-0 (62) 1599
2. Oklahoma 5-0 (53) 1569
3. MICHIGAN 5-0 (39) 1433
4. Navy 5-0 (4) 1177
5. Mich. State 4-1 (4) 937
6. UCLA 5-1 (2) 909
7. West Virginia 5-0 (13) 557
8. Auburn 4-0-1 (8) 516
9. Notre Dame 4-1 462
10. Southern Cal. 5-1 335

FARMER'S
MARKET
Detroit Street
Open Wednesday and Saturday
for
Farm-Frsh Fruits, Vegetables,
Poultry and Eggs

THE LEE JET $7.50. You
can always tell a college man
- by the Lee Jet he wears. For
no other hat in recent years has
so completely captured youth.
ful imagination.

By JOHN HILLYER
Iowa had just rolled up two
quick, stunning touchdowns, to
take the lead on Michigan's young
gridders, 13-0, last autumn.
An apathetic mixture of groans
and wry laughter emerged from
the Michigan stands. This looked
like an "off" year for the Wolver-
ines, who had been crushed by
Army the previous Saturday,
Then something happened -
something which few people pres-
ent that day could put their fing-
ers on. In one mighty effort, the
men in Blue put together a couple
of six-pointers themselves - and
made both of the extra points -
to win, 14-13.
The leader of this vaunted dis-
play was a sturdy, untried young
quarterback with a number 26 on
his back.

"There's no doubt but what that
was my biggest thrill playing for
Michigan," said Jim Maddock.
"I'll never forget that day for the
rest of my life."
Maddock, a 5-11, 190-pound
junior from Chicago, enjoyed
quite a successful high school ca-
reer in the Windy City. Playing
for Fenwick High in the same
backfield with another Michigan
back-Ed Shannon-he received
all-Catholic League honors at
quarterback.
While in high school he also
played guard on the Fenwick bas-
ketball team, averaging about 10
pounts a game while Jim Barron,
now a Michigan cage star, was
copping most of the laurels on
the same team.
Maddock enjoys calling signals
for the Wolverines, but stresses

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Texas A & M 5-1
Georgia Tech 5-1
Holy Cross 5-0
Tex. Christian 5-1
Ohio State .3-2
Pittsburgh 4-2
Duke 4-1
Miami Ohio 5-0
Washington 4-1-1
Mississippi 5-1

313
111
(1) 50
49)
41
38
351
20
14
11

Everything about
the Jet . . . the
lower, telescope
crown, the nar-
rower brim with its
on-the-go snap..
make it a sure

Lloyd Swamps Hinsdale, 20-0;
Gomberg Posts Win by Forfeit

I

LA. Tops Western Division;
Browns Are Strong in East

By JIM BAAD
After another week-end of
banging heads, the National Foot-
ball League standings are only a
little more jelled than they were
before.
The Los Angeles Rams and the
Cleveland Browns are definitely as-
suming the roles of the teams to
beat for their respective division
championships, and the Chicago
Bears may be on their way up.
The Rams handed the Detroit
Lions their fifth straight loss beat-
ing them Sunday, 24-13. This
gave thr Rams undisputed right
to first place in the Western Di-
vision. It also left the Lions with
sole possession of the cellar, and
very little hope of ever getting
out.
Browns, Steelers Tied
The Cleveland Browns are still
tied with Pittsburgh for the East-
ern Division lead as both teams
won last weekend, the Browns roll-
ing over the Green Bay Packers,
41-10, and Pittsburgh beating the
New York Giants, 19-17.
Comparing the two teams, the
Browns seem to hold the edge
over Pittsburgh despite their equal
4-1 status. Both teams shave
shown the necessary offense, but

Cleveland has displayed a strong
defense that has allowed only 44
points scored against them since
their four game winning streak
began.
The Chicago Bears, after win-
ning their first game two weeks
ago, felt thatsthey were on their
way to a title bid. Action last
week (lid not damoe 1 these hopes,
as tl-ey powered past the San
F,mco 49ers, 34-23.
Bears to Play Rams
The Bears play the Rams next
week and this should be a decid-
ing contest for both teams. If the
Rams win, their supremacy is all
the more strengthened, but if the
Bears show themselves stronger,
it would be a harsh setback for
the leaders and 'a key victory on
the march upwards for Chicago.
The Washington Redskins man-
aged to hold on to their third
place position in the Eastern Di-
vision by sneaking past the Balti-
*more Colts, 14-13.r
The Chicago Cardinals played
the Philadelphia Eagles to a 24-24
standstill, leaving both their re-
cords intact since ties are not
counted in the National Football
League.

By JIM VOGT
Lloyd House, behind the aerial
artistry of Bruce Fox, dumped
Hinsdale, 20-0, in the top game
of yesterday's I-M football slate.
The first time Lloyd got the
ball, it scored on a 30 yard pass
from Fox to Don Dueweke in the
end Zone. Fox hit Dueweke again
for the extra point, and from there
on it was all Lloyd.
Lloyd, now one of the four un-
defeated teams, is boasting a 3-0
record. Since it meets winless Hu-
ber next week, it is an overwhelm-
ing favorite to finish the regular
season undefeated.
Lloyd has an excellent chance
to repeat as residence halls foot-
ball champion.!
Highly touted Gomberg had ant
easy time protecting its undefeat-
ed record. Its opponent, Greene
House, failed to show up, so the
Big Reds won by forfeit.
In the high scoring game ofj
the afternoon Adams House posted
a 30-6 win over hapless Reeves.
Dick Peterson accounted for twol
tallies, one on a 30 yard pass from
Dick Ericksen and the other on a
pass interception. Fred Steele and
George Rakolta also crossed, the
stripe for Adams.
A touchback high-lighted Wil-
liams' 8-0 win over Kelsey. For
Williams' other score fullback Jack
Lewis intercepted a Kelsey pass
on his own 18 and ran it back to
the two. On the next play he ran
around right end for six.
In other league action, Ander-
son nipped Wenley, 7-6, and Tay-
lor House blanked Strauss, 6-0.
.f

Michigan and VanTyne finally
broke into the winning column, as
Michigan whipped Scott, 12-0, and
VanTyne handed Huber a 14-0 set-
back.

...

TO SENIOR MEN
Majoring in Business Administration
If you would like to become a key man in a rewarding,
vital industry, look into your career possibilities with the
Michigan Bell Telephone Company.
We can now offer a wide variety of excellent posi.
tions to college men with good scholastic records who
have majored in Business Administration.
To arrange a personal interview, just get in touch
with your Bus. Ad. Placement Office.

MEN, LADIES . .
For that neat and trim
haircut you've a l w a y s
wanted -- See U of M
Barbers today !
715 N. University

leader wherever worn.
Pre-shaped forever, water-repel-
lent treated.
See yourself in the Jet . . .I
any of its dark-for-Fall colors,
Big-Hat-On-Campus
900
Rabideauflarris.
119 South Main
Open Tues. thru Sat.
9 to 5. 30
Monday 9 to 8:30

Our
and 27.

representatives will be ON CAMPUS October 26

MICHIGAN BELL
Telephone Company

I

r

r

Fall Ensemble Suits

Worsteds - Flannels
Tweeds - Gabardines
by
Clothcraft - Winston
Hyde Park -
49.50 to 65.00
TOPCOATS'
Tweeds - Gabardines
39.75 to 65.00
MALLORY HATS
7.50 to 12.50

NUMBER 5 MESSAGE TO FRESHMEN
More Freedom in College
Number 4 will follow
YOU HAVE FOUND more freedom in managing your own time schedule
than you had in high school. This greater freedom definitely implies a
greater responsibility on your part to utilize time to your own advantage.
If you do not shoulder this responsibility, you'll fail to acquire the skill
which you need and which will be yours for the doing. Necessity whets
one's wits for the struggle of life. College training should bring to light
the hidden talents and abilities of each individual and should give neces-
sary disciplinary guidance. To succeed will require long, continued, and
exacting work.
Your work in college places you in business for yourself. This may
be your first experience on being on your own. The outcome will depend

ALL STUDENTS
INTERESTED IN
JOINING SGC
ADMINISTRATIVE WING
ARE INVITED TO
ATTEND

11

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S.GC
MASS

Administrative Wing
MEETING

a

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