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October 16, 1955 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-10-16
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This is a tabloid page

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- Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sundav, October 16. 1955

Sunday, Ocher 16, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

y Boston S ymlp hony Records on RCA Victoro
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CH1ARLES MUNCH, Director
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0Boston Symphony Orchestra - Appearing at Hill Auditorium
Monday, Oct. 24.. 8:30 P.M.
o NEW ORTIJOPHO1NIC TIM1 FIDELITY HECORDIN(JIS
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Tchaikovsky "Pathelique" Symphony ..... . . 3.986
with Pierre Montea
oRavel Daphnis and Chloe . .* ... .3.98
0Charles Munch n
0Berlioz Romeo and Juliet (complete) .....7.98
o Charles Munch with soloists and chorus6
M enotti Violin Concerto.* ,. . . ..3.980
0 Tossy Spivakovsky -violinist
0 Berlioz Damnation of Faust (complete)... ... 11.98 6
o Charles Munch with soloists and chorus
9 U
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LIBERTY musSITHPS ... 204' E. Liberty
MUSIC CENTER ... 300 S. Thayer
}CDICK'S RECORD SHOUP . , . 1114 S. University
0GRINNELL BROS ..#. 323 5. Main C
UNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE ... 508 E. William 6
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Sudy cobr1,15 TH MC GNDAL

CRANBROOK TOUR
Twenty mites northwest of downtown Detroit are located a church, three private
fine libraries, an academy of art and an institute of science.
This is Cranbrook -- a striking illustration of what philanthropy can accom,

DESCENDING POOLS WITH MILLES FOUN CAIN SCULPTURES: FISH & MIERMNAIDS

By DEBRA DURCHSLAG
Daily Magazine Editor
C RANBROOK is a good old
English name. The first Ear
of Cranbrook, Gathorne Gathorne
Hardy by name, was a Britis
statesman who served in parlia
ment with some distinction an
ended up as a Viscount. Th
town of Cranbrook, England -
nestled along the Crane brook-
is considered picturesque, har
working and a tribute to Englis
agriculture.
In America we have given it an-
other distinction. Transplanted t
the Detroit area when George and
Ellen Scripps Booth established
their homestead here in 1904, th
name was first nothing more tha
a nostalgic carry-over from th
Kentish village where the Boot
family had its origins. At firs
through community needs, late]
through conscious planning, th
name Cranbrook now stands fo
a well thought-out concept of edu-
cation.
The public impression of Cran-
brook varies according to specific
interests -- religious, educationa
or cultural. To the school chil-
dren who take museum trips Cran-
brook means the Institute of Sci-
ence - to artists and craftsmen
throughout the country, Cran-
brook signifies fine art. And tc
many others, it is a good way t
spend a Sunday afternoon
TECHNICALLY, Cranbrook Is a
1927 and now including six insti-
tutions. Officially known as the
Cranbrook Foundation, the estate
is fitted out with a charter, a list
of trustees, and endowment. Its
beginning, however, was much
more casual.
The people of the area needed
a meeting house: a place to wor-
ship, to discuss, to send their chil-
dren to school. The Booths, with
the spacious Cranbrook property
at hand, donated a portion of land
and erected a Meeting House in
1918.
Perhaps philanthropy always
starts out by chance. In any event,
the modest community religious
activity soon blossomed into a deed
of gift creating Christ Church
Cr~nbrook in 1925
Meanwhile, the Bloomfield Hills
School, which had been holding
forth in the old Meeting House
had increased so much that in
1929 a new and larger building
was joined with the old, and
Brookside School for younger chil-
dren was established.
CHRIST Church and Brookside
the Booths did on their own
But with the advent of Eliel Saar-
nen, the Cranbrook plan was
crystallized. George Booth, Jr, the
son of the original donor, met
Saarinen up here at the University
while the Scandinavian architect
was on an exchange professorship.
The son had been acquainted
with Saarinen's work, and he knew
that the elder Booth had been
considering the idea of a boy's
school for some time A meeting
was arranged-and today we have
Cranbrook.
After Saarinen built his first
work, the Booth gift of the entire
estate was formalized. The Cran-
brook Foundation was established,
and Saarinen went on to map out
the Cranbrook landscape.
C RANBBOOK School for boys
was Saarinen's first Booth
commission as well as his first
major architectural achievement
in America. The school encom-
passes a group of buildings which
accommodate some 300 students uz

POTTERY ... METALSMITHING ... PAINTING -- AT THE ACADEMY OF ART

REAR VIEW OF CRANBRQUOK SCHOOL FOR B OYS, SEEN ACROSS THE ATHLETIC FIELD

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