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October 16, 1955 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-10-16
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

14

Ptae Eight,

Sun, n O~-rnkp~r1 F 1 OA.Sry d',S/J~ JId/

Sunday, October 16, 1955

0

THE MICHIGAN DALLY

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Educational Objectives

Academy
Plan

"MORE PEOF

(Continued from Page 7)
brook ventures, initiated in 1930.
It was originally planned as a
supplement to the private school
programs, but it was soon evidentl
that its facilities served a widerl
need. Handsomely housed by Saar-1
inen in its present hillside loca-
tion in 1938, the Institute attracts
large numbers of visitors daily and
Michigan school children come
over by the -busload.
Fulfilling its self-imposed edu-
cational objective, the Institute
maintains traveling exhibits as
well as the popular museum dis-
plays. It conducts study groups,
demonstrations and field trips.
Original books and pamphlets are
circulated throughout the coun-
try, and its publications even reach
an international audience.
A fine library, an observatory,
an auditorium, laboratortps, class-
rooms and a lapidary shop with
devices for cutting and polishing
stones round out the list of Insti-
tute resources.
This year it celebrates its 25th
anniversary by opening the first
public planetarium in the state,
named after Prof. Robert R. Mc-
Math ofthe astronomy department
who has served as a trustee of the
Institute since its outset.
BUT PERHAPS the institute that
best sums up Cranbrook is the
Academy of Art. In a sense, the
entire Foundation is an academy

of art-the area planned from the
beginning as a place for creative
ability to ripen. Brookside, Kings-
wood and Cranbrook have all been
formulated closely around the fine
arts.
When Saarinen, Carl Milles and
other artists came to Cranbrook
in the late 1920's to design build-
ings, an informal academy was
already underway. With this back-
ground, the formal establishment
of the Academy was assured.
Academy buildings, designed un-
der Saarinen's hand, are some of
the most impressive on the Cran-
brook grounds. They are sur-
rounded by Milles sculpture, ter-
raced pools and elegant landscape.
The Academy is, needless to say,
the object of much photographic
activity.
The educational atmosphere of
the Academy, however, is what
means the most,-and it more than
matches the setting. Students and'
teachers work together under the
most natural conditions. They
are people with common interests,
rather than instructors and pu-
pils.
The Academy idea was to have
each instructor as "a practicing
artist whose continuing growth in
his own art would help him stimu-
late and advise his students"-
and the idea has been eminently
successful.
See ACADEMY, Page 9

SECTION OF THE 1955 CRANBROOK ACADEMY OF ART STUDENT'S SHOW: now on tour of
colleges and universities in the South and Midwest.

i

Academy
Projects

EXAMPLES OF THE WORK OF MAIJA GROTELL-inter-
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STAFF includes people like Maija
Grotell, head of ceramics, a
top ceramist who is asked to ex-
hibit so often that she has to keep
a list to make sure that she doesn't
send the same pot to the same
place twice.
The deep appreciation of their
craft by instructors like Miss Gro-
tell is evident. When we came in,
she had a small square of clay in
her hands, fingering and smooth-
ing it as she talked to us.
And then there is Marianne
Strengell, head of weaving and
textiles, whose workshop was a
splash of red and yellow yarns
and rich fabrics. Typical of Aca-
demy instructors she supplements
her class interests with her own
project-designing fabrics for au-
tomobile upholstery at the mom-
ent.
The first president of the Aca-
demy of Art was Saarinen. He
designed their buildings, and then
they asked him to head their staff.
It was Saarinen who brought Carl
Milles to Cranbrook, the Swedish
sculptor who along with Saarinen
helped give Cranbrook its inter-
national reputation.
When Milles died in his home
at Milles Garten, Sweden last
month, the largest collection of
his sculpture outside his own coun-
try was located at Cranbrook.
Many of his major works were
commissioned in the huge studio
there which Saarinen built for
him, now divided into smaller work
shops.
Milles' famous "Orpheus" foun-
tain (cover picture) which is lo-
cated in Stockholm can also be
seen in recasting at Cranbrook.
Without the Orpheus, however-
exact duplication was not allow-
able. "European and the Bull," the
dramatic Explorer statue, "Jonah
and the Whale" and other Milles
bronzes are a beautiful comple-
ment to the red and yellow tones
of the Cranbrook buildings.
THE PRESENT staff is up to the
stature of its predecessors.
Zoltan Sepeshy, who took over as
Academy director when Milles left
in 1950, is a well-known painter
whose oils are owned by most of
the major museums. He is a grad-
uate of the Royal Academy of Fine
Arts in Budapest, studied in Paris
and Vienna, and worked under
Milles at Cranbrook as head of the
painting department.
The international character of
the Academy's staff and its fine
reputation have attracted a great
many foreign students, with 13%
of the students coming from Cana-
da and abroad. Of four outstand-
ing scholarships awarded this year
three went to foreign students.
N 1942 the Academy was offi-
cially recognized as an institute
of higher learning when it was
chartered by the state and given
the power to grant degrees. Ap-
plicants of 18 years of age who
are high school graduates or the
equivalent qualify to apply to
Cranbrook. Students are accept-
ed on the basis of their work and
the course of study they plan to
follow.
Three degrees are given at Cran-
brook: Bachelor of Fine Arts, Mas-
ter of Fine Arts, and Master of
Architecture. Non-degree students
are also accepted but enrollment
is limited to 101.
A six-week summer session is
also included in the Academy pro-
gram, with courses abbreviated but
similar in content to the regular
curriculum.
THE ORIGINAL founders of
Cranbrook, Ellen Scripps Booth
and George G. Booth died a few
years ago, having done well by
Cranbrook. They saw the Meeting
House that they had erected in
1918 grow into a Foundation of
six independent institutions. Saar-
inen died in 1950, Milles died last

month-but capable people have
come to take their place.
Cranbrook now belongs to the
public.
PICTURES BY JOHN HIRTZEL
AND THE CRANBROOK PHOTO-
GRAPHIC DEPARTMENT.

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