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October 15, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TSE MICMGAN DAILY

ATURDAY, OM

10_ j

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, 0(71

A MODERN LEGEND:
German Choir Gains Recognition

Y'

for Dinner or Snack

..it's MILK MAID!

The story of the Obernjirchenv
Children's Choir, like the part
almost takes on the aspect of
legend.
But this story is a modern fairy
tale, one that began not "once
upon a time," but just a very few
years ago.
Obernkirchen is a town nestled
in a valley in Lower Saxony, not
far from the legendary Pied Piper's
Hamelin.
Social Worker's Idea
A short time ago, a social worker
named Edith Moeller was seeking a
way to raise funds for the town's
orphanage. She conveived the idea
of organizing a choir of musically
talented children to give local con-
certs, in order to earn money for
the orphanage.
In the summer of 1953, the Choir,
not only unknown, but barely con-
sidered in the professional class,
entered the International Eistedd-
fod in Llangollen, Wales. Chal-
lenging the 25 larger, more exper-
ienced singing groups from all
over Europe, the children walked
off with first prize.
Success 'Phenomenal'
At the Wales festival they sang
a song written for them by Miss
Moeller's brother, Friedrich. It
was "The Happy Wanderer," a
tune that swept them to instant
and quite unexpected fame.

Their first concert tour last sea-
son was phenomenally successful.
The group will make their Ann
Arbor debut at 8:30 p.m. Monday
in Hill Auditorium.
Membership in the singing group
does not depend on either pro-
fessional, social, religious or poli-
tical standings. The children are
sons and daughter of professional
people, federal and municipal em-
APO To Begin
Poster Display
Poster distribution to University
bulletin boards will begin Tuesday,
October 18.
Any poster of general interest to
the campus may be put up. All
posters must have the Alpha Phi
Omega approval stamp before be-
ing displayed.
Posters found on the University
boards without this stamp will be
removed and held in the APO
office for claiming or request to
stamp and repost.
APO's office on the second floor
of Lane Hall is open for approval
of posters from 1 to 5 p.m. week-
days and from 9 to 12 Saturdays.

ployees, artisans, farmers and
laborers. Some are refugees from
Germany's Eastern Zone.
Spirit of Unity
The spirit of unity fostered
among the members of the Choir
is Miss Moeller's carefully planned
policy. She maintains an intimate
and friendly connection with the
homes of the children. Even their
parents consider themselves mem-
bers of the Choir community.
Obernkirchen's farmers still
maintain their old homely tradi-
tions. The women working in the
fields are attired in bright red
skirts, like the generations of wo-
men before them.
Authentic colorful copies of
Obernkerchen's historic costumes
are worn by members of the Choir
-blue velvet jackets, black shirts,
grey striped skirts and long white
stockings.
The children are no different
from children in America in that
they occasionally are mischievous
and join in games with gusto.
But their favorite food is not
ice cream; surprisingly enough.
The American edible which im-
presses them most, which they
never tire of and which they con-
sume with great glee is, of all
things, corn flakes!

HALF FRIED CHICKEN
FRIED SHRIMP
Delieious MALTS and SHAKES
CURB AND TABLE SERVICE

,;

MILK MAID DRIVE-IN RESTAURANT
370 Washtenaw near Pittsfield

Open 'tit 2 A.M.

Phone NO 8-7146

11

--Daily-Dick Gaskil
"PUT SOME LIFE IN THOSE EYES!",
Student Finds Expression
Stifled Camera Snout

Come

to Church

I

1

N, --®

By ROBERT F. JONES

"Now, let's see some EXPRES-
SION," the photographer grinned,
stepping out from behind his bulky
camera.
Expression was the last thing I
was capable of at that moment.
An eternity of microscopic chin-
adjustments, face-tiltings and
spine-straightenings had reduced
me to a feeling of sculpted im-
mobility. So this was Senior Pic-
tures. The words themselves seem-
ed accompanied by the distant jar
of a brass gong.
'Let's See Some Life'
"C'mon now, let's see a little
life," my inquisitor said. I grinned
stupidly.
"No. Relax your mouth. It's all
taut."
Indeed, it was. Every muscle was
as of wire. A dutiful puppet, I
relaxed my face, feeling the musc-
les slump to the pull of gravity.
"Now wait a minute," the photo-
grapher snarled. "Your eyes.
Senior Pictures
Sales Continued
Senior picture sales have been
extended to Friday, Oct. 21, ac-
cording to Ensian staff members.
All seniors who have received'
their proofs are requested to bringj
them to the Student Publications
Building between noon and 5 p.m.
or 7 and 9 p.m.

They're dead. Let's get some life
in those eyes!"
I injected a quick dose of life
into my eyes, but from his ex-
pression I knew it was no good.
Unconsciously, I 'shifted the posi-
tion of my left scapula. I could
actually FEEL the life flood into
my eyes.
'You Slumped!'
"What? What?" the photogra-
pher cried. "You slumped!" I
quickly snapped back to my posi-
tion of attention.
He snorted. Guilt pressed more
heavily on my shoulders. I tried
again with the life thing. Heumust
have sensed my feeling of futility,
and with no further ado, clicked
the shutter.
I bounded from my seat, but his
voice snared me in my tracks.
"No, no. We've five more to
take."
After that it wasn't bad. He'd
given up on me: I concentrated on
the sounds of photographic action
emanating from the other side of
the room. The second photogra-
pher was running a coed through
the ritual. Definitely more photo-
genic than I, she possessed in addi-
tion the ability to look alive while
actually captivated by her mus-
culature.
Maybe some day they'll succeed
in extracting blood from turnips,
silk purses from sow's ears.
But never will they get life into
my face under a battery of white
light and the snout of a Senior
Pictures camera.

Sunday

1

i

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00
A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:45 A.M.-Meeting for worship.
6:30 P.M.-Young Friends.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
Sunday services at 8, 9, 11 A.M. and 8 P.M.
Breakfast following the 9 A.M. service.
Coffee hour and informal open house at Canter-,
bury House following Evensong at 8 P.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, Eugene
A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship.
5:30 P.M. Supper and Fellowship
6:45 P.M. Worship and Program-

u

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone No 2-1121.
William C. Bennet, Pastor.
10:00 .A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Shadows Of The Cross.
6:00 P.M. Student Guild.
7:00 P.M. The Lame Shall Leap
7:30 P.M. Prayer Meetings.
We welcome you.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church -- Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sat. at 4:00: Open House After the Game.
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Services, with the
pastor preaching on "How To Witness Effec.
tively." (Holy Communion in the 10:45sere
ice).
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. At 7 the officers
will conduct the candlelight initiation ceremony
in the chapel for new Gamma Deltans.
Wednesday, 7:30 to 9:00: Training meeting for
Campus Evangelism.
Thursday, 8:00: Pastor's Church Membership
Class.
Thursday, 8:45 to 9:45': Chapel Choir Practice.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
'Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00. Morning Service "The Keys of the King-
dom"
7:00 Evening Service.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Father Eusebius A. Stephanou
9:30-Matins Service.
10:30-Divine Liturgy.
11:00-Greek Sermon
12:00-English Sermon.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Reverend Press-
"Life's Real Purpose".
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.

.N

GRADUATES

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
State and Williams Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr

CHURCH

in Engineering, Mathematics, Physics

LOCKHEED

AIRCRAFT

N California Division
Georgia Division
* Missile Systems Division

representatives
will be on campus TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18
to discuss your future in Lockheed's expanding research
and development. For interview see your Placement Officer

CORPORATION

Church School and Nursery at 10:45. Junior
Church in Douglas Chapel, 10:45.
Public Worship at 10:45. Wendell Orr, accompa-
nied by the choir will sing Christiansen's
"Built on a Rock." Choir anthem, "Glorify the
Lord." Sweelinck.
Dr. Parr will preach on "The Folly of 'A Change
of Climate.' "
Pilgrim Fellowship in the Youth Room 5:30.
At 7:00 p.m. the Student Guild will meet at the
home of Dr. and Mrs. Hoobler of the Medical
School. Dr. Hoobler will speak on "Religion,
Ethics and Medicine." The Graduate and Pro-
fessional Group meet at the Guild House at
8:30 P.M.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
Minister: C. H. Loucks
Student Advisor: Beth Mahone
Sun. Oct. 16
9:45 Guild Bible Class; Parables of the King-
dom.
11:00 Worship Service: Layman Sunday, Prof.
Wm. Kerr, Speaker.
6:45 Guild.. "Even your best friend won't tell."
Prof. Robert Blood, Speaker.
Wed., Oct. 19
4:30-5:45 Tea in Guild house.
Thurs., Oct. 20-7:00. A.M.. Yoke. Fellowship
Chapter two "Campus Gods on Trial."
Fri., Oct. 21-8:00 P.M. Guild hike and wiener
roast.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor.
Sunday-9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services and
Holy Communion.
10:00 A.M. Bible Class.
6:00 P.M. Supper honoring Lutheran Interna-
tional Students. Speakers from Germany and
Jerusalem.
Thursday-7 :15 P.M. Discussion Series Led by
Prof. Gerhard Lenski-"Science & Religion."

,,
x
.,

All three divisions of Lockheed are engaged in a long range expansion program in their fields of endeavor.

I

California Division activities
in Burbank
cover virtually every phase of aircraft,
both commercial and military. 46 major
projects are in motion, including 13
models of aircraft in production-
extremely high-speed fighters, jet trainers,I
commercial and military transports, radar,
search planes, patrol bombers. The
development program is the largest and
most diversified in the division's history.1
New positions have been created for
graduates in: Aeronautical, Civil,,
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering
and Mathematics and Physics.r

At Lockheed
in Marietta, Georgia
new C-130A turbo-prop transports and
B-47 jet bombers are being manufactured
in the country's largest aircraft plant
under one roof. The division is already one
of the South's largest industries.
In addition, advanced research and
development are underway on nuclear
energy and its relationship to aircraft.
A number of other highly significant
classified projects augment the extensive
production program. 0

Missile Systems Division
in Van Nuys, California
specializes in the technology of guided
missiles. Its research and development
cover virtually every field of scientific
endeavor, and offer engineers and
scientists problems of increasing
complexity. Positions are open for B.S.,
M.S. and Ph.D. candidates in:
Aeronautical, Electrical and Mechanical
Engineering and Mathematics and Physics.
In addition, a scholarship program leading
to M.S. Degrees has been established for
those able to qualify for graduate standin.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" W Z ABC Net.
work Sundays-i1:00.1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister.
Mrs. Gerald Bailey, Parish Assistant.
9:15 A.M. 8th-9th grade class.
10:00.A.M. Church school. Unitarian adult group
Mr. Robert Hunter reviewing: "The People's
Padre."
11:00 A.M. Service of Worship-Sermon by Rev.
Edward H. Redman: "The Story of the
Church."
6:30 P.M. Unitarian Student Group Supper Meet-
ing Pick-up at Lane Hall and Stockwell at
6:15. Supper Reservations NOrmandy 2-0085.
Miss Kay Schumacher to talk on the national
work of Liberal Religious Youth, and show
color slides of her European Liberal Religious
Conference tour.
luAUAAIDIAE 1U4DICTIAM CUtDI _U

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 .Washtenow Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister.
Wri. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant

}
t

New positions have been created for
graduates in: Aeronautical, Civil,

>?

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