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October 06, 1955 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-10-06

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rAGE SM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6 1933

PAGK 31K TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. OCTOBER 6.1955

- I 1 4

WILKINS DISCUSSES NAACP:
'U Alumnus Lauds Thurgood Marshall
By SHIRLEY CROOG

It's not everyday a potential
Young lawyer has an iopportunity
to "rub shoulders" with a nation-
ally known man. '
But for Roger Wilkins, '56 L, a
summer's job provided a chance
not only to work with law books,
but to participate with Thurgood
Marshall in some of the activities
the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People
is undertaking.
As a research assistant to Mar-
shdll, the chief consul for the
NAACP in New York, Wilkins pre-
pared memoranda for several
cases concerning segregation in
the South.
Wor'ked With Vital Issues
Working with vital legal issues,
Marshall handed Wilkens assign-
ments involving research on Con-
stitutional technicalities and stat-
ute rights.
In the courtroom Wilkins saw
Marshall as a "colloquial" speak-
ing lawyer, completely aware of
his position, duty, and convictions,
determined to win the fight for
desegregation.
During daily conferences, Wil-
kins observed Marshall, the indi-
vidual. "Always ready for criti-
cism on every side, Marshall was
the burly loud-talking, wise-
cracking, shoes-on-the-desk fel-
low worker," Wilkins revealed.
Put at his ease by the unassum-
ing attitude of his employer, Wil-
kins was able to notice Marshall's
outstanding talent for "drawing
ideas from his co-workers, exam-
ining them, testing their validity,
synthesizing them, and finally put-
ting them to -use.
Pitfalls Cited
Wilkins cited some of the pit-
Art On.View
In Alumni Hall
An exhibition of work by mem-
bers of the art school faculty of
the University of Washington is
on view in the North Gallery of
Alumni Memorial Hall.
Included are 16 paintings, one
drawing, and a group of photo-
graphs of furniture, silver and
crafts objects and a group of
textile samples.
The exhibition is in exchange
for the one by the University
faculty now displayed on- the
Washington campus and will re-
main on view through October 25.

X.
ROGER WILKINS -A
falls which the NAACP faces.
During the summer, Georgia, a
state still vehemently upholding
the segregated school law, issued
a resolution against "all those con-
nected with the NAACP," and
threatened to revoke licenses of
teachers advocating desegregation.
Wilkins went to work collecting
data to test the Constitutional
validity'of the resolution. A short
while later, however, the resolu-
tion was rescinded.
Statute Issued
"There were other cases con-
cerning segregation that came up
before the NAACP national of-
fice," Wilkins said. "Alabama
tried to issue a statute which
would tax the NAACP right out
of existence.
"In Charleston, South Carolina,
the NAACP won a fight against
segregation in the buses," Wil-
kins said.
Wilkins believes there are two
main ways which the NAACP may
employ to fight segregation. One
is through arbitration, the other
through social analysis.
"Sheer bargaining with school
boards is not an easy task," Wil-
kins asserted. "Sometimes We
run into a situation where influ-
ential citizens attempt to use their
local prestige to force the Negro

-Daily-Hal Leeds
A FIGHT TO THE END
citizen to refrain from fighting
for his rights."
Refers to Louisiana
Wilkins referred to the case in
Louisiana where Negroes petition-
ed the school board to aid desegre-
gation. Citizens counsels, consist-
ing of influential men threatened
to injure individual Negroes' se-
curity for their petitioning the
school board, and thereby forced
them to remove their names.
"I feel strongl ythat the NAACP
must fight the segregation prob-
lems by analyzing and studying
the social conditions first. Then
they must find a way to bring
about desegregation with the
slightest amount of friction," he
continued.
"The law is on the NAACP's
side in this fight for desegrega-
tion," Wilkins said, "and where
necessary, they'll use it. It's go-
ing to be a hard fight, but they're
determined to see the end."
An alumnus of the University,
Wilkins was an active undergradu-
ate. He was honored by Sphinz,
Michigauma, and the East Quad
Quadrants and last spring he was
elected to Barristers, the law
school honorary society. At pres-
ent he is a resident advisor in
East Quad and a student member
of the CGC Review Board.

Fraternities
Use Secret
Rush Check
To guard against violations of
rushing regulations Interfraternity
Council employs an ingenious
system of policing that would make
Pinkerton envious.
Bob Knutson, '56, IFC executive
vice-president, pointed out the
system is mainly a preventive
measure since "We've had very
few violations in the past."
Fraternity presidents are en-
trusted with the job of checking
on each other to make sure the
game is fairly played.
Divided into Districts
University fraternities are di-
vided into five districts, each head-
ed by a president (who is elected
from fraternity presidents in the
district.)
Each district president is re-
sponsible for checking on frater-
nities in other districts. A master
chart, drawn up by Knutson, uses
code numbers to identify which
fraternities come under the juris-
diction of which district presi-
dents.
Only Knutson and the district
president involved know what fra-
ternities are being checked and
when. Each president knows only
the fraternities for which he is
responsible. Reason for the secrecy
is to insure fairness.
Manpower is provided by frater-
nity presidents - all of them.
Each district president uses the
house presidents in his district
to check on the fraternities under
his jurisdiction. The presidents
work in teams of two.
Watch for Illegal Contact
They check fratenity houses,
dormitories' and eating places
around town. They watch for any
illegal contact between fraternity
men and rushees.
Both fraternities and rushees
are liable for rushing infractions.
Maximum fine for fraternities is
$100 and/or denial of pledging
privileges for one period. For
violations the rushee may be de-
nied the right to pledge the fra-
ternity that violated laws in his
behalf.
"During the rushing period,"
Knutson said, "each fraternity
will be checked several times,
dorms will be checked six or seven
times and eating places will be
watched periodically."
Cooperation with quadrangles is
achieved through th Resident Ad-
visors. All infractions are reported
to the and in turn to Knutson.
Four Professors
Write on Germany
"German Democracy at Work,"
a book by four University profes-
sors who were in West Germany
at the time of the crucial 1953
Bundestag elections, will be pub-
lished tomorrow by the University
Press.
'dited by Prof. James K. Pol-
lock, chairman of the department
of Political Science, the book is a
selective study also including
material by department members
Prof. Henry L. Bretton, Prof.
Frank Grace and Prof. Daniel S.
McHargue.
Is the German commitment to
democracy sincere and can Ger-
many remain a democracy are
some of the questions the authors
ask.

Live Fast.*.
LANSING (P) - The State
Liquor Control Commission de-
clared yesterday that the sale
of intoxicants must stop at 2
a.m. next New Year's day be-
cause the holiday falls on Sun-
day.
In its annual instructions to
licensees for the holiday season
the Commission said state law
forbids the usual extension of
the 2 A.M. New Year's Eve clos-
ing hour. Normally, It is ex-
tended to 4 A.M. to accommo-
date celebrants.
Kueher Tells
Of Research
DETROIT (JP) -- Research by
Ford Motor Company scientists
and engineers covering such things1
as a device to fight heart ailments
and a new "dream" car with some-
what fantastic characteristics was
described by company representa-
tives today.
The program was outlined to
newsmen assembled for a three-
day preview of the new Ford Con-
tintal Mark II Prestige car.
A. A. Kucher, director of Ford's
scientific laboratories and an
authority on nuclear energy, told
of work on a project called a "car-
diac manometer." He described
it as a miniature electrical meas-.
uring device attached to a tube
which could be inserted into the
heart cavity through a vein. Ku-
cher said it would measure varia-
tions in pressure on the heart
while it is beating.
Ford engineerg said the new
"dream" car has been called the
"Mystere." They described it as
an auto with an engine in the
rear, with interchangeable inter-
nal combustion or gas turbine
power. It has a glass canopy roof
with no windows to raise or low-
er. The canopy is lifted to permit
entry and exit.

be accepted through Dec. 15, 1955. For
applications, write to The Ford Foun-
dation, 477 Madison Avenue, New York
22, New York. Further information may
be obtained in the Offices of the
Graduate School.
Fellowships for Women are being
offered by Sopoptilist International As-
sociation for 1956-57. These fellowships
are for women in unusual fields who
hold at least a Master's Degree and
are well established in their chosen
field. The stipend is $3,000.00. The
deadline for applications is Dec. 1,
1955 and candidates will be notified by
March 1, 1956. Application forms may
be obtained from Mrs. Alida H. Dyson,
3700 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles
18, Calif. Further information is avail-
able in the Office of the Graduate
School.
Astronomy Department Visitors' Night
(Only high school age and older ad-
mitted.) Fri., Oct. 7; 8 p.m., the Ob-
servatory (across from University Hos-
pital). Tour of the Observatory and
observation with telescopes of the
Hercules Cluster and a double star.
Note: Individual children accompanied
by adults will be admitted. Special
children's nights have been scheduled
for Oct. 28 and Nov. 25 at the Angell
Hall Observatory.
Academic Notices
The Extension Service announces that
there are still openings in the following
classes to be held in Ann Arbor:
changing Order in Asia, 7:30 p.m.,
Thurs., Oct. 6, 131 School of Business
Administration,
Registration for this class may be
made in Room 4501 of the Administra-
tion Building on South State Street
during University office hours, or in
Room 164 of the. School of Business
Administration on Monroe Street, 6:30
to 9:30 p.m. the night of the class,
Law School Admission Test: Applica-
tion blanks for the November 12 ad-
ministration of the Law School Ad-
mission Test are now available at 110
Rackham Building, Application blanks
are due in Princeton, N. J. not later
than Nov. 2,- 1955.
Doctoral Examination for Hunein
Fadlo Maassab, Epidemiologic Science;
thesis: "Approaches to the Biochemical
Analysis of States of Viral Develop-
ment," Fri., Oct. 7, 1006 School of Pub-
lic Health, at 2:00 p.m. Chairman, W.
W. Ackermann.
Psychology Colloquium. Friday, Oct. 7,
4:15 p.m., Aud. B, Angell. Dr. Donald
Marquis will speak on "The Psychology
of Graduate Psychology." Open to
public.
Inorganic - Analytical - Physical
Chemistry Seminar. Thurs., Oct. 6, 7:30
p.m., in Room 3005, Chemistry Build-
RENT
a typewriter
and keep up
with your work
Portables
Standard Office
Machines
Wide Carriage Machines
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State St.
Since Phone
1908 NO 3-2481

I U

Clifton
Fadiman

Dr. Rudolf Henry
Bing Hull

Albert
Dekker

LECT'

R

ing. Dr. R. B. Bernstein will speak on
"Source of the Oxygen in Precipitated
HgO and Ag2O18 Isotope Effect in the
Reaction of OH- with HG ad Ag ."
Seminar in Applied Mathematics will
meet Thurs., Oct. 6,, at 4:00 p.m. in
Room 247 West Engineering. Prof. John
W. Carr III will speak on "An Introduc-
tion to Digital Computing Machines."
Events Today
Carillon Recital by Percival Price,
University Carillonneur, 7:15 tonight:
Modern Flemish Carillon compositions.

(BUCK MEYERS
and his Orchestra
Available for your
dancing pleasure
Phone Ypsilanti 33 84M
Read The Classifieds

SE

Oct. 12 -- Gen. Carlos P. Romulo
"America's Stake in Asia"

Oct. 18 -

Dr. Rudolf Bing
"What Makes Opera Tick?"

Nov. 15 - U.S. Sen. Alexander Wiley
U.S. Sen. Wayne Morse
Debate: "Our Foreign Policy-Right or Wrong?"

Nov. 21 --
Jan. 10 -
Feb. 20 -
Mar. 6 -

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Henry Rull
"An Evening With Mark Twain"
Clifton Fadiman
"Reading I've Liked"
Dr. Norman Vincent Peale
"Positive Thinking"
Edith Atwater
Albert Dekkir
"Two's A Company"

1

(Continued from Page 4)
Upsilon, Reeves, Sigma Alpha, Epsilon,
Sigma Alpha Mu, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu,
Sigma Phi, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Taylor,
Theta Chi, Theta Delta Chi, Theta Xi,
Triangle, Trigon, Zeta Beta Tau.
,October 9: Hayden, Phi Delta Phi, Psi
Omega.
The Ford Foundation is offering fel-
lowships for 1956-1957, for study and
research on foreign areas and foreign
affairs. They are available to seniors,
graduate students, young faculty mem-
bers, and scholars who have the doctor-
ate. Applicants should be under 40.
Work should pertain to Africa, Asia,
the Near East, the Soviet Union or
Eastern Europe. Study and research
may be undertaken in the United
States or abroad beginning as early as
the summer of 1956. Applications will
ItJ

SEASON TICKETS: Main Foor $7.50-Balcony $6.50
BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY
HILL AUDITORIUM

F

PETE SEEGER
SINGS AT
HARTFORD AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH
6300 HARTFORD, CORNER MILFORD
DETROIT
Tickets 1.50 Advance-On sale at Grinnell's

Gen. Carlos
P. Romulo

U. S. Sen.
Alexander
Wiley

U. S. Sen.
Wayne Morse

Dr. Norman
Vincent Peal*

I

11

SPECIAL STUDENT RATE' $300
STUDENTS and WIVES
Second Balcony Unreserved

I

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YOU'LL BOTH GO FOR THIS CIGARETTE!
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