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February 19, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THRE

Icers

Win
11' Rallies
or Victory;
[owes Star
(continued from page 1)

WIHL STANDINGS
Team W L T Pts Pts
Lost
MICHIGAN ..... 11 2 1 15 5
Michigan Tech .. 11 2 0 15 3
Colorado College 10 4 0 14 6
North Dakota ... 7 11 0 10 12
Minnesota ........ 7 10 1 9 12
Denver........... 4 8 2 8 16
Michigan State .. 1 15 0 2 19
ONE-POINT GAMES LEFT TO PLAY
Michigan Tech-6
MICHIGAN-4
Colorado College-4

" - DAY AND NIGHT
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FEPRUARY 20
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ENROLL TODAY IN NEXT CLASS.
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Founded in 1915 Phone NO 8-7831 State and William Sts.

L

'BEST DUAL MEET EVER':
Track Squad Nips Kansas, 58-56

Special to The Daily.
much depth 'for the Jayhawks,
LAWRENCE, Kan.-A talented who had 18 of 24 letterwinners
array of Wolverines swung the axe back from the group that finished
and crushed a powerful Kansas third in the NCAA outdoor finale
Jayhawk cinder team here last last spring.
night for a 58-56 win in a dual Canham, usually pessimistic in
natch that attracted the attention viewing his own team, joyfully
of devoted track fans throughout analyzed the victory by stating,
the nation. "Balance did it for us. Our 'big
Michigan mentor Don Canham, shots' came through with firsts
who has been head coach since and the rest gave the support."
1948, labled the thriller "the best Of 12 events on the meet schedule
dual meet we have had yet, in- at the new Kansas field house,
cluding outdoor .meets." each team took six firsts. Ron
The Michigan crew had just too Wallingford, captain of the Wol-

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verines, gained the distinction of
being the lone double winner in
the close contest.
The little Canadian (he's 5'8"
and 147 pounds) romped home in
the grueling one-mile and two-
mile runs.
Wallingford broke the tape at
4:14.6 in the mile and then de-
feated Al Frame, 1954 NCAA cross
country champion, in the two mile
with a 9:21.7 clocking.
Eight of a possible 10 Michigan-
Kansas dual meet marks fell, with
but one running event having tor-
rid times. The two hurdle races
are 60 yards this year instead of
65 as in the past, so those records
will also go into the archives.
Other first-place winners for
Michigan were pole-vaulter Eeles
Lanstrom, hurdler Tom Hendricks,
quarter-miler Bob Rudesill, and
880-man Pete Gray.
Brendan O'Reilly, known for his
high-Jumping, turned in two third-
place finishes in the hurdles to
help spell the difference. He has
practiced only two weeks over the
sticks.
Another late-comer, Jim Pace
racked up a creditable second
place in the 60 yard dash, behind
Kansan ,Dick Blair, who tied his
school record with a :06.2 timing.
Landstrom vaulted 14'3%", al-
most a foot better than the second-
placers. Ron Varian gave team-
mate Gray a run in the 880,rolling
at a, 1:55.9 pace, compared to the
winner's 1:55.5.
Two Big Ten champs, Dave
Owen and Mark Booth, met super-
ior opposition. Owen's fine shot
put went over 54 feet, but NCAA
winner Bill Nieder did 58'%", his
personal best. Booth fell one inch
short of Bob Cannon's 6'6/a" high
jump.

Indiana, which had a 48-39 defi-
cit at half, began to find the
range early in the second half,
and fought its way to a 54-54
deadlock, only to see the hosts
pull away to another fair-sized
lead.
B r a n c h McCracken's quintet
kept putting on the pressure, and
knotted the count at 71-all on
guard Charlie Hodson's push shot
with six minutes remaining. Things
still seemed to be in Michigan's
favor, as the visitors were playing
without high-scoring Wally Choice,
who had fouled out a minute be-
fore.
Needless to say, it didn't work
out that way.
After both tegms had messed
up scoring chances, Indiana center
Archie Dees found an opening and
sent his team into the lead, 73-71.
Seconds later Kramer scored from
under the boards to score his 29th
and 30th points, re-tying the
score.
Dees and Wolverine Captain
Tom Jorgensen traded baskets, but
sub Dick Neal put the Hoosiers
ahead for keeps by scoring with
2:30 left in the game.
Michigan resumed the offensive
but saw a golden opportunity slip
out of its fingers when Pete Til-
lotson blew two free throws. In-
diana lost possession of the ball,
and the 5,500 spectators sensed
that this might be Michigan's
night.
They saw Kramer free under
the basket, but groaned in unison,
Wow! 61' 5-1/4"
NEW YORK (P) -- Parry
O'Brien shattered every world
shotput record - indoors and
outdoors-when he got off a
tremendous heave of 61'52/" in
the national AAU champion.
ships here last night.
O'Brien now owns every shot-
put record in the book, holding
the outdoor mark of 60'10".
Bob Backus of the N.Y.A.C.
smashed the world indoor 35-
pound weight throw record with
a flip of 63'101/".
it seemed, when he blew his easy
chance.
Indiana, putting on the deep.
freeze, added three more foul
throws before the final horn.
sounded.
The Wolverines got off to a fast"
start and pulled away to an early
16-11 lead. The visitors managed
to move into an 18-18 tie, but nev-
er saw the lead again in the first
half.
STATISTICS

r

TT!T!!=!TM

he didn't see the puck till it was
past him.
The big senior from Toronto,
Ont., then made the night com-
plete for himself and his team-
mates, as he put the game out of
the Gophers' reach at the 11:39
mark after Bob Schiller had dug
the puck out of the corner to begin
the play.
Schiller added insult to injury
at 19:44, scoring the Wolver-
STATISTICS
FIRST PERIOD: 1-Michigan, McDon-
ald (Switzer, Hanna) 7:41; 1-Min-
nesota, Yackel (Jetty) 18:30; 2-
Minnesota, Yackel (Jetty) 19:03.
Penalties: Michigan, Schiller (high-
sticking) 10:21.
SECOND PERIOD: 2-Michigan, Mac-
Farland (Rendal, McIntosh) 0.40;
3-Michigan, MacFarland (Schiller)
6:32; 4-Michigan, MacFarland (Mc-
Intosh) 11:39; 5-Michigan, Schiller
(Dunnigan, McDonald) 19:44.
Penalties: Michigan, Hanna (inter-
ference) 5:15; Rendall (charging)
13:30.
THIRD PERIOD: 6-Michigan, Mc-
Donald (Pitts) 2:33.
Penalties: 'Michigan, McIntosh
(handling puck) 5:39; Rendall (ille-
gal check) 17:44; MacFarland (mis-
conduct) 18:28. Minnesota, Schmidt
(tripping) 3:15; Newkirk (charging)
8:28; Yackel (misconduct) 18:28.
ines' fourth goal of the period.
The husky defenseman slapped a
bouncing shot from the right
boards near the blue line that
hopped over McCarten's stick.
Michigan goalie Lorne Howes
was spectacular in the nets during
the period as Minnesota tried des-
perately to keep themselves in
contention.
Michigan got off to a slow start
in the opening period. After Neil
MacDonald countered at 7:41, the
Wolverines saw their slim lead dis-
appear into mid-air late in the
stanza, as Ken Yackel beat Howes
twice within 33 seconds.
On the second goal, Howes
made a brilliant stop, but they
alert Gopher pounced on the re-
bound and slipped it into the net.
The third period was a rough-
and-tumble affair, as tempers
flared on both sides. All in all,
there were six penalties meted out,
three to each team.
Tech plays at Michigan State
this coming weekend and Colorado
hosts Minnesota, while the Wolv-
erines will play Montreal Uni-
versity.

LI'

I:

aI

*,

INDIANA

G F P T

Choice, f ......,... 9 9-11 5 27
Thompson, f ........ 1 1-1 1 3
Neal, f..............,1 0-1 2 2
Barley, f ............ 0 0-1 3 0
Dees, c..............6 2-2 4 14
Obremskey, g ....... 1 0-0 1 2
Hodson, g .......... 5 11-11 1 21
Bryant, g............5 1-3 0 11
Totals ............ 28 24-30 17 80

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FEB. 22nd
CHORAL UNION
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