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May 30, 1956 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-05-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

*lV .La950..

THE M CHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN.

30. 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVE?~

.

[ICHIGAN UNION PRESIDENT:
[agazines, Union Activities Interest Todd Lief

By PETE ECKSTEIN
Those who hold that a man's
haracter is revealed by what he
eads may ponder the fact that
odd Lief's favorite magazines are
'he New Yorker, Advertising Age
nd Mad Comics.
The New Yorker, by way of in-,
erpretation, might lead us to
onclude that the former Union
'resident is an English major. He
njoys such contemporary writers,
s J. D. Salinger, Conrad Aiken
nd Thomas Wolfe, and he wants
to write a novel someday" but
asn't had time to begin it.
Advertising Age might give a
lue as to Lief's occupational ob-
ective. He'll begin working for the
Tni Company as soon as he grad-
.ates, learning the trade "from
he advertiser's point of view."
While he wouldn't trade his Uni-
ersity years "for anything," one
wearies of studying and cramming.
I'm very anxious to get out and
o something in the business
rorld."
An Unrevealing Choice
As for his third favorite, Mad
omics, Lief denies his taste tells
nything revealing. "It's just a lot
f chucks."
A roommate insists that "Play-
oy" should also go on any list of
fief's favorite periodicals, but no
urther explanation was offered.
He finds he has more time for
,ch things as magazines now that
ew officers have taken over at the
rnion. "You look forward to your
etirement," he remarked in his
w-pressure, philisophicalway.
But when it comes, it's hard to
djust to. You feel like you're
heating, not attending a meeting
r working on a project."
Except for special occasions
like having his picture taken)
Aef has shed the repp ties that
larked his tenure at the Union.
Lut the charcoal stacks, battered'
oafers and shirts with button-
own collars and rolled up sleeves
o on. Cigarette in hand he leanedc

back, and stretched his legs under
one of the new tables in the Union
Snack Bar.
Conversation drifted to the con-
test to name the room. "We had
a couple of good entries. I espe-
cially like the 'Arbor-Eatum. An-
other good one was 'Joe's and the
Orient.' It would give people some
place to go back to."'
He described the Snack Bar as
his favorite part of the new addi-
tion. "The atmosphere here is very
relaxing." He admitted, however,j
that he doesn't often have trouble
relaxing.

.4

A Casual Sort
"I've been characterized as
somewhat of a casual sort of a
guy. I guess that's true. I very
seldom clutch, even when I haven't
studied for an exam."
A Union employee passed by,
staring good-naturedly but point-
edly at his shoes on the seat.
Lief was born in St. Louis, where
he lived 12 years before moving to
his present home in Glencoe, Illi-
nois.
An inauspicious beginning for
the future head of a University
student organization, his high
school extra-curricular work was
limited to being "in a few plays."
At the University he started out
in the combined literary college-
business administration school pro-
gram. "But I soon realized 'it
wouldn't give me the kind of edu-
cation I really came to college for.
"After all, I have alifetime to
learn a business, but the four years
in college are the only time I'll
have to learn what are. called the
'finer things.''
Lief wasn't sure his University
training would be of much prac-
tical use to him in the world of
Madison Avenue and Toni twins.
But. he wasn't worried about it.
"The liberal arts background is
valuable in a different way."
While Lief values his whole acp-
demic experience highly, he lists

the Union has been thrust outside
itself. Student government was an
entirely new kind of obligation,
and I'm sure the Union will rapidly
grow to appreciate its opportuni-
ties in this area."
Lief was overheard telling a co-
worker, "I hate to point out trends.
Unless you're a genius, you're usu-
ally wrong." And while disclaim-
ing the genius implications, he was
willing to discuss a trend or two in
the University.
"I'm apprehensive over the ter-
ribly fast growth of the Univer-
sity. It's inevitable, though, and'
we'll just have to adjust to it
somehow,
"In theory a large school can be
just as effective as a small one,
but the problem is bridging the
gap between theory and practice.
A Factory Texture
"The University assumes day by
day the texture of a factory. In
some ways' it's getting too large
to provide the academic learning
environment.
"I don't think I could ever send
a son of mine here if the Univer-
sity had 40,000 students and no
way to insure an academic envir-
onment.
"No, it definitely wasn't a mis-
take coming here. The University
is the finest state university in the
country without a doubt."
Lief was willing to make capsule
comments about other aspects of
his life at the University.
Coeds? "I have no complaints
about Michigan coeds," he said en-
thusiastically.
His famous vocabulary? "I make
a point of reading the dictionary
at least five hours a day."
Sports? "Golf's the greatest."
Academic freedom? "People tend
to confuse phrases and labels like
'academic freedom' with some sort
of undercover work. They give
them a sinister aspect. That
shouldn't be the case."
University anecdotes? "I'll never
forget the chap who, in the pres-
sure of studying for a philosophy
final, stole a book on ethics from
the library."
Smoking? "I began it during
finals my freshman year. I could
give it up if I wanted. In fact, I'm
always in the process of giving it
up."
Cutting classes? "It's a handicap
in getting 'A's."
His ever-present pack of winter-
green Life Savers? "I asked my
grandmother once why they call
them 'Life Savers.' You know what
she said? She said, I don't know.'
"I've been frustrated ever since."

Open Rush
IFC Pledges
Aunounced
The following men were pledged
during the Spring, 1956 open
rushing period:
Acacia, Kenneth Brugess, '59E,
Robert Cherba, '58E, Bruce Geh-
man, '59E, David Littell, '59, Eu-
gene Miller, '59, John Ohlson, '59;
Alha Delta Phi, Robert Ford, '58;
Alpha Epsilon Pi, Harvey Ruben-
stein, '60; Alpha Phi 'Alpha, M. C.
Hamlin, '58, Douglas Strong, '59;
Delta Chi, Duncan Hudson, '59
A&D, Paul Menard, '57, Robert
Quay, '58; Delta Sigma Phi, Ross
Whaley, '59; Kappa Sigma, Ellis
Davis, '60E.
Also pledged were: Phi Kappa
Sigma, William Borough, '58E,
Clarence Carl, '58E, Gene Gar-
baccio, '59E, Eric Garbutt, '58E,
Fred Julian, '60Ed, Bert Korhonen,
'59, Robert Lutz, '59E, Donald
Shepherd, '58, Gerald Smith, '60;
Phi Kappa Tau, John York, '59E,
Richard Kane, '59E; Sigma Alpha
Epsilon, David Faul, '58, Jamil
Khoury, '57, Michael Shatusky,
'58Ed; Sigma Alpha Mu, Larry
Levy, '59, Sigma Chi, Jerome
Victor, '58.
Others include, Tau Kappa Ep-
silon, Richard Bailey, '57, Thomas
Lewis, '59E, John Rasmussen, '58E;
Triangle, John Noerr,''59Ph, Rob-
ert Schulz, '58E; Trigon, David
Blood, '59E; Zeta Psi, James
Leach, '57. Charles Miller, '59E,
Francis Newton, '59, Harold Sch-
midt, '59, Robert Waldeck, '58E.
Prof. Fontaine
To Visit Here
Prof. Rene Fontaine, professor
of surgery at the University of
Strassborg, France, will be here
today through Friday Dr. Freder-
ick Coller, chairman of the depart-
ment of surgery announced yes-
terday.
Prof. Fontaine will speak 'on
"The Practice of Surgery Behind
the Iron' Curtain" at 8 p.m. to-
morrow in the second floor amphi-
theater at University Hospital.

Another shipment, Genuine
All-Dacron sleeping bags
Full size 36" by 83"
Advertised price $27.00
SPECIAL PRICE $19.95
Fox Sporting Goods Store

624 S. Main

Phone NO 2-4407

I

SPECIAL!

FOLLETT'S
will buy
YOUR COLLEGE
TEXTBOOKS
for
CASH,
IT'S SO EASY to sell your discarded books
to FOLLETT'S. Textbook values decrease
rapidly as new editions and more up-to-date
books are constantly being published. SELL
YOUR BOOKS as soon as you have had your
exams and get today's top value for them.

-Daily-Bill Van Oosterhout
TODD LIEF-Former Union President takes life easy.

SEMI-ANNUAL

1.*,

PANT SALE
Complete Stock of Dress Pants

"The Mind of Primitive Man,"
taught by Prof. Leslie White of the
anthropology department, as the
"most stimulating and challenging
course I've ever taken, although
it's misnamed. "You don't always
agree with what's being taught,
but your appetite's been egged on
a little."
Prof. G. B. Harrison of the Eng-
lish department he considers "one
of the deepest, most profound men
I've ever taken a course from. I
was immediately impressed by his
wisdom."
But, Lief maintains, "anyone
who claims he's learned at college
all he came for has the wrong
idea. After four years you just be-
gin to realize what you don't know
-but at least you know where you
can find out."

"The Michigan Union is. here to
serve the entire campus, and that
Union must always be sensitive to
the demands, wishes and pre-
judices of students and have the
responsibility to see that they're
satisfied."
"The Union has stepped out of
itself a little bit. It's started to
realize that there's a larger area
to deal with than it thought be-
fore.
A New Complexion
"It's taken on a new coed com-
plexion, reflecting the continuously
changing atmosphere of the cam-
pus. The Union senses that change,
and in order to be accepted by that
campus it must react to it."
Sitting on Student Government
Council for a year he found "an
unusual experience, for me and
for the Union. For the first time

FOLLETT'S
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322 South State Street

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A Little Overwhelmed
His first semester at the Univer-
sity, Lief tried out for the Union,
although he admits, "the freshman
is a little overwhelmed by all the
opportunities open to him."
But in retrospect, "it's been most
rewarding to work with a group of
guys so interested in things out-
side themselves. The Union is one
of the most meaningful and perm-
anent organizations at Michigan."
Lief was asked to review what
he considers real progress by the
Union since he has been a part of
it, for example, the new addition.
"You can look at it, measure it
and weigh it," he said of the wing.
"But other, more qualitative
changes, can't be as objectively
measured. There's been a new feel-
ing of what the Union's responsi-
bility to the campus should be.

Social Security
in 3 seconds

-A

Sunday

STICK
DEODORANT
Quickest, cleanest deodorant
you've ever usedl Simply glide stick
under arms-it melts in instantly.
Contains THIOBIPHENE*,the most
effective anti-bacteria agent. It's
the New Kind of Social Security
-gives you absolute assurance.

TO, ALL RESIDENTS
OF QUADS AND DORMS:
Did you know that GREENE'S will pick up and
store your woolen garments, bedspreads, blankets?
Why cart your belongings home and back? Before
you leave for the summer drop your clothes and
spreads at the house desk. GREENE'S will pick
them up and return them in the fall.
FULL COVERAGE INSURANCE
FIRE --THEFT --MOTHS

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mosses Daily at '7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00
A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
iP.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. -11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns,
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00 to 1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
William B. Hutchinson, Eugene A. Ransom
Ministers.
9:00 and ,10:45 A.M. Worship, "Word To The
Frontier," Dr. Abbey preaching,
Next Wesleyan Guild meeting will be an open
house for summer school students on Sunday,
June 24 at 7:30 P.M.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
% REFORMED
423 South Fourth Avenue
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Morse Saito, Student Director
10:45 Worship Service.
7:00 Student Guild.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Chester H. Loucks and Duane L. Day, Min-
isters. Student Advisor: Beth Mahone.
9:45 The student class will conclude its studies
on the life and character of Jesus.
11:00 Sermon: "ON TRUTH." Reverend Day.

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8 o'clock Holy Communion at St. Andrews Church
(Breakfast at Canterbury House following th.
9 o'clock. )
11 o'clock Morning prayer and sermon.
5:45 Buffet Supper.
7 o'clock open house.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Rformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washteriaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service.
7.00 Evening Service.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:45 A.M. Friends Meeting.
10:45 A.M. Sunday School.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & South Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9 and 11:00 a.m. Worship Services
10:00 a.m. Bible Study
5:30 p.m. Meet for a Picnic.

4 to 5 months' supply,
*Trademark

plusta

no more
" runny liquid
" sticky cream
9 'messy fingers

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 Sunday School.
11:00 "JESUS THE GREAT DELIVERER."
7:00 "PURSUING THE WILL OF GOD."
Wednesday 7:30 Prayer Meeting.
We Welcome You.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister.
Wm. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant

At leading department and drug stores.
SHUL TON
New York Toronto

CALL

IISE DIIIIi i:J .M (,lldrnan autsto omindtiat i

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister.

Sunday: Morning worship at 9:15 and
Dr. Kuizenga preaching.
Sunday: 5:30 P.M. W.S.F. picnic and
at the Baker's.

11:00 A.M.
open house

SEND

-1111 4A.Of% A AA fL:I J.._... '_r3 t-_

1 11

- !- -% r% l ! 2 1

III

11 10:30 A.M. Children 'and adults for combined final 11

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