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May 30, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-05-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEMI~ED

NE SDA!

Sig

Eps

Ca t re

I-Ml

Cha mpionsh

"I

Top LCA To Win
Phi Delta Theta R
By FRED WERTHEIMER JCart
Led by the brillant four-hit of the elev
shutout pitching'' f Cal Atwood,
Sigma Phi Epsilon edged Lambda drive far c
Chi Alpha 3-0, in a tense eleven head for aI
inning duel to capture the I-M Heusel, s
Social Fraternity Softball champ- proceeded 1
ionship yesterday at Wines Field. on four s:
The victory clinched the overall Lavercomb
I-M championship for the Sig Eps, first out bu
who have, now won this crown for smashed a;
six out of the past eight years. Phi and when
Delta Theta, the defending cham- the ball bo
ions, finished a close second, andN
they were followed by last year's
runner-up Sigma Alpha Mu in With me'
third Walt Ande
Good Pitching shortstopS

Softball;
unner-up
wright led off the top
venth by belting a line
over the centerfielder's
home run.
haken up by the clout,
to walk George Lempio
traight pitches. Larry
e struck out for the
ut then pitcher Atwood
single past third base,
the leftfielder booted
th runners advanced.
Wild Throw
m on second and third
arson grounded to the
whose hurried throwl

, . . . . . . .. . .
the ge/ine...
WITH DAVE GREY

sThegame was a heartbreaking
lossfor Lambda Chi hurler Dick
Heusel who struck out eleven and
Bring Qu ck Results s allowed four oscattered elvnt
ntil the fatal eleventh.
STORE HOURS DAILY INCLUDING SATURDAYS 9 TO 5:30
So long .., i you are
traveling this summer you
might stock up on "wash n wear"
garments before you leave. '
Dacron-Cotton wash 'n wear
ARROW SHIRTS $7.50
SHIRTCRAFT SPORT SHIRTS
HAGGAR SLACKS $7.95
HASPEL SUITS! $39.75
S T A T E S T R E ET A T L I B E R T Y

to the plat~e went wild allowing~
two runs to score. Lambda Chi got
out of the inning with no further
trouble.
In the bottom of the eleventh
Atwood retired the side in order
striking out two of the three
hitters.
Lambda Chi threatened in the
first inning. Fran fLeMire led off
and was hit by a pitch. He stole
second and third to, put a runner
in scoring position with nobody
out.
Atwood struck out the next two
batters and got cleanup hitter
Ed Ellison to ground to second.
Ellison led off the bottom of the
seventh with a single to center and
Tennis Finals
Zeta Beta Tau won the I-M
S o c i a l Fraternity T e n n i s
Championship yesterday, beat-
ing Phi Delta Theta, 2-1. Con-
trary to yesterday's Daily, the
Phi Delts' victory Monday over
Sigma Alpha Mu was in the
semi-finals, not the finals.
was sacrificed to second by Dick
Good. He then advanced to third
on a short fly to rightfield.
Catcher Paul Day, who caught
well all day, picked off Jerry Mer-
ritt's foul fly on a fine running
catch to end Lambda Chi's last
threat.
In the third place professional
playoffs Monday, Alpha Kappa Psi
defeated Delta Sigma Pi 11-7, in-
stead of the other way around as
reported in yesterday's Daily.

STREAK STOPPED-General Manager Joe L. Brown of the
Pittsburgh Pirates plays desk for Dale Long, right, as the Pirates
first baseman signs a new contract for $16,500. Brown tore up
Long's old one-for $14,000-after long hit eight homers in eight
consecutive games. The streak was stopped yesterday by Brooklyn.
MANTLE CLOUTS 18TH:
NiXon Hurls Three Hitter.
As Boston Beats Yanks"

..

NEW YORK (4P)-Righthander
Willard Nixon lost his chances for
a no-hit game in the eighth inning
yesterday, but still managed a
three-hitter at the Boston Red
Sox whipped the first-place Yan-
kees, 7-3.
Nixon had a no-hit game until
Billy Martin tripled in the eighth
inning after two were out.
Mickey Mantle hit his 18th
homer of the year in the ninth.
Mantle now is nine games ahead
of the pace maintained by Babe
Ruth in 1927 when he hit 60
homers. Ruth drove No. 18 in his
48th game, on June 7. '
Ted Williams, sidelined since
April 18 when he broke some
blood vessels in his foot, returned
to the Red Sox starting line-up,
but failed to hit in four trips.
* * *
ROOKIE HITS TWO
BALTIMORE (P)-Harmon Kil-
lebrew got into the game when
Pete Runnels was spiked yesterday,
and promptly socked two home
runs for his first hits this season
to propel the Washington Natio-
nals to a 6-5 victory over the Balti-
more Orioles.
* * *
RAIN DELAYS WIN
KANSAS CITY (P)-The Chicago
LET US KEEP
MICHIGAN GREAT
Success "to the staff
and students
The Daseola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

White Sox were halted by rain for
an hour and 15 minutes in the 12th
inning yesterday before they fin-
ished a 3-run rally that gave them
a 7-4 victory over the Kansas City
Athletics.,
BELL SMACKS THREE
CHICAGO (AP)-Outfielder Gus
Bell smashed three homers to pro-
duce seven RBI's in a five for five
batting day, to give Brooks Law-
rence his sixth victory without a
deafeat in Cincinati's 10-4 triumph
over the Chicago Cubs yesterday.
LONG STOPPED
PITTSBURGH ()-Don New-
combe stilled Dale Long's booming
home run bat and the Pittsburgh
Pirates 10-1 yesterday, for his
seventh victory of the season.
Long, who blasted eight home
runs in eight games to set a new
major league record, went hitless
in four times at bat Tuesday.
a jor League
Standings

A Final Look Ahead
The approach of summer seems to be a reoccurring theme in the world
of Michigan sports. For most of us, it is the lull before the fall
season of football.
It was about the same time last year that we were looking ahead
somewhat vaguely to another big grid year. Other sports also looked
promising, but they were pretty distant in our minds. And somewhere
in the shuffle, the activities of Michigan athletes in the summer had
been slighted.
It's about the same story as last year, only there are a few major
changes in the script and the outlook.
Schedulewise, Kalamazoo will be the scene of the NCAA tennis
championships from June 25-30. About two weeks earlier on the West
Coast, the NCAA track championships will be held at Berkeley, Calif.
and the University of California; while golf will be held at Ohio State
late in June.
, * **
Build up to a Big Year ...
Tennis star Barry MacKay will be touring with other Davis Cup hope;
fuls abroad and later back in the United States. Training camps
and further tryouts for the various Olympic squads will also be held
in the summer months ahead. The big build-up is coming; and before
we know it, one of the potentially biggest sports years will be upon us.
From a strictly "Michigan
standpoint," the overall picture
can't help but lean toward the
optimistic, as most Wolverine
teams seem to be reaching their
peak years all at once-veteran
squads with promising new talent
particularly in baseball, golf, ten-
nis, hockey, basketball, gymnas-
tics, and swimming. In fact, you
can keep on easily down the list in
strength to include track and
wrestling. All of Michigan's teams
have a chance-on paper at least
-to do well next year.
But no matter how you look at
it, the sights for Michigan sports
have to point primarily to foot-
ball. And in looking back, to ap-
proximately the same setting last
year, a few thoughts come to mind.
Objectively, this appears to be
"the season." Michigan's senior-
laden team should be stronger--TERRY BARR
again by the personnel-than last .back again
year's.
]Depth will be missing to a certain degree in several key spots, but
a basically veteran football team will take the field against UCLA
September 29, the second Saturday of classes.
Michigan should be in the thick of the conference title race, and
with the Rose Bowl barriers of Ohio State and Michigan State ri
moved, it seems inconceivable to hush any talk of a trip to California.
But the season is not going to be that simple. I remember how last
fall almost everyone was up when Michigan was up, and down In
spirit when the gridders' fortune hit a late-season wall. Michigan
footballers are going to have to fight for the title, and Michigan fol-
lowers are going to have to give out full support. Although many* ma
overlook it, the proverbial "school spirit" can have a great deal to
help or hurt a team's performance.
It could be a great year-for all of us.
Football Schedule
September 29-UCLA-here
October 6-Michigan State-here
October 13-Army-here
October 20-Northwestern-here
October 27-Minnesota-here (homecoming)
November 3-Iowa-at Iowa City
November 10-Illinois-here
November 17-Indiana-here
November 24-Ohio State-at Columbus
Horseshoe Champions
Delta Tau Delta captured the were Jim Reider, Dick. Zimmer-
S o c i a 1 Fraternity horseshoes man, Jack Demorast, George Ner-
championship early this week, sesain, Rick 'St. John, and Bill
when they defeated Lambda Chi Nueman.
Alpha, 3-0. The Lambda Chi's had been the
Members of the winning team defending champions.

NATIONAL'
w.
Milwaukee .. 17
St. Louis .... 22
Pittsburgh .. 19
Cincinnati «. 19
Brooklyn ... 18
.New York . 14
Philadelphia 11
Chicago .... 9
AMERICANI
W.
New York .. 26
Cleveland ... 20
Boston...... 19
Chicago .... 16
Baltimore 17
Detroit .....16
Washington . 16
Kansas City 15

LEAGUE
L. Pct.
9 .654
14 .611
14 .576
15 .559
15 .545
19 .424
21 .344
22 .290
LEAGUE
L. Pct.
13 .667'
15 .571
17 .528
15 .516
20 .459
21 .432
22 421
22 .405

G.B
22/
2%
61z,
9
10%
G.B.
4
5%
6
8
9
9/
10

Van Boven STRAWS
These hats were made to our own dimensions
and block from only the finest and lightest
of straws. You will find the new colors
and style concept add a refreshing note
to your summer wardrobe.
om $6.00
ft:* ' :..a t,[

c;
Ie

c

0

11I II I

III

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