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May 16, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-05-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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WE~DNESDAY, MAY 16, 1956i

THE MICHIGAN DAILV

PA r*V. WtU 't.1PIt

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'

Tennis Squad
Netters End Home Season
Against Western Michigan

Fa'ces

Broncos

Tod a

Major League Standings

1

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Yesterday's Gaines
New York 6, Chicago 4
Brooklyn 7, St. Louis 5
Philadelp,bia 3, Milwaukee 1
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh-post poned
rain

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Yesterday's Games
Detroit 6, Boston 3
Chicago 5, Washington 1
Baltimore- 9, Kansas City 5
New York at Cleveland postponed.
rain

Thinclads Impress Canham
With Victory Over Hoosiers

Standing

By FRED WERTHEIMER
Well,, it looks like rain today!
For the third straight week, Mi-
chigan's tennis team is attempting
to meet Western Michigan in a
match at the Varsity courts.
If all goes according to sched-
ule, the heavens will deluge their
waters, on the world in general,
and Ann Arbor in particular, at
approximately 2 p.m. this after-
noon.
Today will probably be the last
opportunity that Michigan will
have to face the Broncos. and un-
less the courts are flooded the meet
will be played.
Today will also be the last
chance that Michigan fans will
have to see this year's undefeated
squad. The netters travel to Ev-
anston, Ill., this weekend to meet
Northwestern in their last regu-
larly scheduled match.
The squad, by virtue of its re-
cent Big Ten victories over In-
diana, Illinois, Ohio State and
Michigan State has now extended
its dual meet winning streak to 29.
Some of the statistics which the
tennis team has compiled since re-
turning from its southern tour
are amazing. The netters have
shut out six out of their eight
opponents.
Furthermore they have amassed
a total individual matches record
of 70 victories as against two
losses.
To get deeper involved in fats,
the individual players have achiev-
ed an unbelievable record of win-
ning 133 sets while losing only sev-
Broncos Weakened
Today's meet should not be much
of a. test for Michigan's power-
house. Although Western Michi-
gan came the closest of any team
to beat the Wolverines last year,
losing 5-4, the graduation of the
top three men from the Broncos
squad has considerably weakened
them..
Most of their matches this year
have not provided the netters with
strong opposition.
However last Monday's meet
against Michigan State gave Mi-
chigan more competition than the
9-0 score indicates.
Both Dick Potter and Mark
Jaffe had some troble in winning
although neither lost a set.

Milwaukee .
St. Louis..
Brooklyn ....
Cincinnati>.
Pittsburgh -.
New York ...
Philadelphia
Chicago ....

WV.
I
15
13
13
10
6
3

I
84
9
10
10
13
15
14

Pct.
.687
.652
.591
.565
.524
.435
.286
.263



Jaffe played on the erratic side'
in his first set and went down 3-1.
He came back strong to take it 7-5
and won the next set quite handi-
ly.
Potter, playing Dick Menzel who
last year finished third in the Big
Ten at number two singles, won
his first set without trouble. How-
ever, he appeared to tire in the
second set and held out to win
7-5.
Dale Jensen and Larry Brown,
who have been continuously over-
shadowed by the feats of the high-
er singles players kept up their
strong play which has seen them
lose only one match between
them.
Their doubles play has been
equally strong and they have not
lost a match, while playing togeth-
er, all year.

DOUBLES PLAY-Dale Jensen (right) and Larry Brown, Michi-
gan's number three doubles team have not lost a match all year.
Both will be in action today when the netters meet Western
Michigan here,

By BOB BOLTON
"We just outlegged them," said
Don Canham. Michigan TrackI
Coach, as he accounted for his;
team's surprising rout over In-
diana Saturday.
Before the meet Canham had
figured the Hoosiers were close to
Michigan's equal on paper. But
the Wolverines came up with sev-
eral above-par performances and
literally ran Indiana into the
ground.
With the decisive victory over
Indiana under their belts, and with
,several of the formerly disabled
thinclads returning to top flight
form, the future of the cindermen
appears brighter.
Gray Runs Well
Pete Gray, who has been prac-
ticing hard since his recovery from
the mumps two weeks ago was un-
der two minutes for the 880-yd.
dash and should be in top shape
for the conference championships.
The mile-relay team, hampered
by injuries most of the season, will
also be in shape for the Confer-
ence championships.
George Gluppe, Don Matheson
and Laird Sloan all have returned
or will soon return to practice.
Dick Flodin, who todk second place
in -his first 100-yd. dash for the
Wolverines Saturday, rounds out
the quartet.
More good news for Michigan
track fans is the fact that sprinter
Jim Pace is recovered from his
back injury and should round into
shape rapidly.
In Canham's words, "Pace, if
healthy, is the best sprinter in the
Big Ten and one of the best in
the nation."

The biggest surprise of Satur-
day's victory was the performance
of Fred Potter. The tall sopho-
more took seven and one-half
points with second place finishes
in the high and low hurdles and
a third in the broad jump.

W. L. Pct.
Cleveland 15 9 .6"5
New York .. 16 10 .615
Chicago .... 11 8 .579
Boston.......11 11 .500
Baltimore . 13 14 .482
Washington 11 14 .440
Kansas City . 9 14 .391
Detroit ......9 15 .375
Games Today
Boston at Detroit
New York at Cleveland (N)
Washington at Chicago (N)
Baltimore at Kansas City (N)

Games Today
St. Louis vs Brooklyn at Jersey City
Chicago at New York
Milwaukee at Philadelphia (N)
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh

TI

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OFFSET IMPROVED HITTING:
Errors, Poor Pitching Hurt 'M' Nine

By JIM BAAD
Michigan's baseball team has
dropped two of its five Big Ten
Tigers Sox
Swap Four
CHICAGO-The Chicago White
Sox Tuesday swapped outfielder-
infielder Bob Kennedy and infield-
er Jim Brideweser to the Detroit
Tigers for outfielder Jim Delsing
and infielder Fred Hatfield.
None of the four players has
performed regularly this season,
although Delsing was regular left
fielder and Hatfield regular sec-
ond sacker for the Tigers last sea-
son.
Dodgers Buy Maglie
BROOKLYN - The Dodgers
Tuesday purchased Sal The Bar-
ber Maglie, veteran righthanded
pitcher and their old Giant nemes-
is, from the Cleveland Indians and
sold righthander Jim Hughes to
the Chicago Cubs.

starts-both of them heartbreak-
ers in the late innings.
The eleventh inning loss to Ind-
iana 'has been explained away,
but the first game of Saturday's
double header with Purdue still
has Coach Ray Fisher mumbling
to himself.
Errors and poor pitching in the
clutch were the eighth and ninth
inning weaknesses which took
away the yictory. Michigan did
well enough at the plate. The Wol-
verine hitters collected 14 hits and
scored five runs, which should
have been enough to beat Pur-
due, according to Fisher
The Michigan coach seemed to
think the turning point of the
game was an error committed by
Moby Benedict in the eighth in-
ning. It was a fairly difficult
chance, as a runner was between
Benedict and the ball as he moved
up to field it.
"I think he took his eye off it
momentarily, though," said Fish-

er, "because he had it and then
bobbled it." One runahad already
scored in the inning and the error
loaded the bases again which
seventually led to another run
scoring.
Had Benedict made the play, it
would have ended the inning.
The single error came at a bad,
time, but was not the whole of the
Wolverine troubles. Steve Boros
made a throwing error in the ninth
'which put the winning run on
second.
Batting Averages I

I
An
2 a
~.,.>A.k.'

SUMMIER FORMAL
famous "After Six"
OWN YOUR OWN-it may be cheaper
than renting !
These super stain-shy, crease resistant
wlite formal jackets are only $26.95.
Other ackets in orlon-rayon and dacron-
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11

#0~
,.. -

(10 or more times at bat)
AB
Poloskey...........10
Boros.70. .
Thurston...........18
Fox ..,............6
Ronan.,...........:'201
Sigman .. .....64 1
Benedict..........0 1
Sealby............. 63 1
Tommelein......... 68 1
Tippery............ 57 1
Snider.............,53 1
Overall Team Average 524

If
4
2S
6
?_1
6
is
18
16
16
13
11

Pet.
.400
.357
.333
.304
.300
.281
.257
.254
.236
.288
.208

Cummerbund-tie
sets from $5.
A T LI1 BE R T Y

ST

A

T E

S T R E ElT

1 x I R,:

.....

. . ....

..,.

147 .285

SANTEE LOSES FIGHT:
Court Upholds AAU Ban

What's

doing

NEW YORK AP)--Wes Santee's
hopes of regaining his amateur
status and running in the Olympic
Games apparently were crushed
Tuesday when the State Supreme
Court upheld the lifetime suspen-
sion imposed on the great Kansas
miler by the Amateur Athletic
Union.
Justice Walter A. Lynch, who
handed down a biting opinion after
six weeks' deliberation, also rapped
the knuckles of amateur officials
who seek to capitalize on sports
stars.
"He, Santee, has eliminated
himself as an amateur athlete,"
Justice Lynch said, "but not with-

out an ,Assist from some of the
guardians of amateur athletics."
The justice added: "Promoters
of amateur athletic meets should
realize that while Santee, by his
conduct, disqualified himself from
amateur competition, the fault lies
in no small part with them as a
class.

The Original Wasp, the first P & W A engine-designed,
fabricated and assembled in less than seven months. Weigh-
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power, this lightweight, air-cooled radial engine was a
milestone in aviation history and set the pattern for almost
three decades of record-breaking advances.

at Pratt & Whitney
A ircra ft

a I

The secret--they're SYNCHRO-DYNED!

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The irons feature an exclusive tough alloy steel with a
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If you're interested in whittling strokes off your game (and
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PLAY SPALDING CLUBS AND BALLS-golf's most winning
combination.

shoes
are
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Today's leadership . .. a
reflection of policies established
in aviation's infancy
Back in The Roaring Twenties, the magic dream pictured Ameri-
can families someday using the light personal airplane as freely as
the family car. Among the realists, however, was a handful of men
who were unshakable in their conviction that the real future of
aviation lay with bigger aircraft, higher speeds, greater ranges -
all possible only through engines of higher power and more relia-
bility than those of that era.
In the spring of 1925, six of these men of vision founded a
company in Hartford to undertake the development of a new air-
craft engine- an air-cooled type. The year's end heralded their
first success-Pratt & Whitney Aircraft's "Wasp".
This talented group of men continued to improve their power-
plant designs, developing engines of steadily mounting power that
operated efficiently and dependably. They contributed much to
aviation's progress -so much so that currently three-quarters of
the world's commercial airliners and many of our nation's first line
military aircraft are P & W A-powered.
Today's P & W A powerplant designs are supported by the
very finest research facilities and equipment, and a technical staff
that is continually being strengthened. That nucleus of six men has
grown into one of the world's leading engineering organizations.
Yet to this very day, engineering achievement at Pratt & Whitney
Aircraft is guided by its founders' simple policy . . . the best air-
planes can be designed only around the best engines.
World's foremost
designer and builder
ofaircraft engines
ISRATT £ WHITNEY

The Wasp Major, a 28-cylinder engine with pistons arranged
in four rows of seven each and a 3800-horsepower rating.
Its power and performance having never been equalled, the
Wasp Major represents the apex of the art of building
reciprocating engines.

The Double Wasp, an 18-cylinder, two-row piston engine
rated at 2400 horsepower for basic use. Its rating increased
by water injection to 3400 horsepower, the Double Wasp
was instrumental in turning many a military crisis into an
aerial victory in the decisive battles of World War II.

The 1-57 Turbojet, first jet engine in history to be officially
rated in the 10,000-pound-thrust class. In quantity produc-
tion since early 1953, the J-57 has continuously undergone
progressive development. It gives every indication of having
almost unlimited growth possibilities.

>

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