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February 17, 1956 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-17

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17, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

W& #*IV

17, 1956 THE MTCIITGAN DATTV - a ~

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'

Many Events Planned
By League For Spring

C">----

By PAT NORTON

Second semester is always an
active one for the Women's League
and this year is no exception.
Many campus activities are
sponsored jointly by the Men's
Union and Women's League.
One act being presented this
year by the Inter-House Council
and Assembly Association will be
Franz Polgar, memory expert, hyp-
notist and mind reader. This pro-
gram will be held at 8:15 p.m. to-
night at Hill Auditorium.
Gulantics Scheduled
Another activity sponsored by
the Men's Union, Men's Glee Club
and the Women's League will be
the all campus talentshow, Gulan-
tics.
This year it will be held on Sat-
urday, Feb. 25 at Hill Auditorium.
Gulantics is the only campus
show in which the audience se-
lects the winning acts. An audio-
meter will determine the three
winning acts and they will be
awarded cash prizes. About 10
-, acts will be competing for these
prizes.
The entire first part of the se-
L Religious Groups
Begin' Semester
With Discussions
By JOAN QUINTO
Student religious groups on cam-
pus have started the new semester
on a serious note with most of
their activities being centered
around panel discussions and for-
At 8:15 p.m. tonight, at the
Hillel Foundation, a Friday eve-
ning forum series entitled, "Reli-
gion in' the Modern World" will
begin.
Gamma Delta, the University
Lutheran Chapel group, will gather
at 6 p.m. Sunday for supper.
Square Dance To Be Given
On the lighter side, the Unitar-
ian Student group is planning an
ice skating party on Sunday eve-
ning at the Coliseum. The Baptist
students are polishing up their
Virginia Reel for a square dance
to be given at 8 p.m. tonight at
the Fellowship -1sl.
At 6 p.m. Wednesday the Stu-
dent Religious Association, in con-
junction with the World University
Service, will hold a Brotherhood
B lanquet at Lane Hall
Canterbury House for Episcopal
students will hold a "Get-
Acquainted Open House" for
graduate stude'nts tonight, and at
7 p.m. Sunday, the students will
participate in a group discussion'
on "Sacramental Living."
Valentine Party Tonight +
The Methodist students will
dance to records tonight at a Val-1
entine party given in the lounge
of the Wesleyan Guild. At 4:15
p.m. on Tuesday the group will
meetfora movie and discussion
on the Anerican Foreign Policy.
To celebrate the Lenten season,
the Presbyterian Student Center is
featuring a special series of wor-
ship services at the church.
The Evangelical and Reformed
student groups will meet at 5:30
p.m. at the Congregational church
on Sunday for A dinner and dis-
cussion.

mester will include petitioning and
interviewing for all the League
positions.
Petitioning for Frosh Weekend
began Monday and will end at 5
p.m. today, with interviews being
held next week.
Sophomore openings may be
petitioned for from Thursday,
March 1 to Wednesday, March 14.
Interviewing will be held from
Thursday, March 15 to Tuesday,
March 27 by the Interviewing and
Nominating committee.
Junior Posts Openy
For junior posts, petitioning will
be held from Wednesday to Mon-
day, March 5, with interviews be-
ing held from Tuesday, March 6
to Tuesday, March 13.
Petitioning for ' senior positions
is going on now and will continue
until Feb. 27 and interviews will
be held from Tuesday, Feb. 28 to
Friday, March 2.
Spring dances are also being
planned by the League. The first
dance will be held next Friday
in the Vandenberg and Michigan
rooms.
To Honor Seniors
An important date for all gradu-
ating women to remember will be
Thursday, March 22, Senior Night.
This event precedes the opening
night of Junior Girls Play. Senior
coeds march by resident groups
from the General Library to the
&ague in their caps and gowns.
After the march the graduating
coeds will go to the League Ball-
room for the traditional cere-
monies held in their honor.
Junior coeds will present their
class project on Friday, March 23,
and Saturday, March 24, in the
League.
Long Awaited Night
Another important League event,
Installation Night, will be held on
Monday, April 10. At this time
anxious coeds will learn who will
be the officers of the League, Pan-
hellenic, Assembly and Women's
Athletic Association for the com-
ing year.
On Friday, April 27 and Satur-
day, April 28 freshman coeds will
present their annual class project,
Frosh Weekend.
On these days the two teams,
the Maize and Blue, will compete
against each other when they pre-
sent their dances. Highlighting
each dance will be a musical floor-
show, written and produced by the
respective teams.
Once again this semester the
League will also sponsor bridge

ISA Slates
Panel Talk
For Students
Third Debate in Series
Will Feature Forum
On Higher Education
European and American gradu-
ate students and one faculty mem-
ber will present an analysis of
the American system of higher
education at 8 p.m. today in the
recreation room of the Interna-
tional Center.
Third in a series of Internation-
al Student Association sponsored
discussions, the debate is entitled
"American Education Through
European Eyes," and will cover
the academic, social and political
aspects of the United States edu-
cational system.
Representing Europe will be
Charles Spillman, a graduate law
student from Switzerland, Odile
Benoit of France, Ole Lando of
Denmark and Hans Yager of Ger-
many.
American Viewpoints
American viewpoints will be
offered by Milton Tamres, assist-
ant professor of chemistry and
James Prendergast of the law.
school.
Beginning the program Spillman
will present a brief summary of
the main points of the system of
education in Europe, followed by
Prendergast who will cover the
same points on education in the
United States.
Designed to Clarify
The entire series, consisting of
discussions between American
students and students from other
national or regional groups, is de-
signed to clarify misconceptions
about political and cultural pat-
terns of other nations.
Alice Spuellher of Switzerland is
in charge of the entire series.
Throughout the semester other
discussions between American and
international students will be of-
fered.
Continuing until the end of May
the discussions will deal consecu-
tively with the countries of India,
Japan, Turkey, Africa, Pakistan
and Korea.

By MARY BETH GODFROY
Varied entertainment is offered
this weekend for those students
who are still recuperating from
finals and those recovering from
the shock of registration with all
its closed classes.
Tau Delta Phi "Hoodlums" and
their dates will gather tonight for
a "Blackboard Jungle" party,
while guests of the Alpha Epsilon
Pi's will attend the "First Week
Frolic." Entertainment at inter-
mission will be provided by mem-
bers of the fraternity.
Members of a new social frater-
nity on campus, Phi Epsilon Pi,
will be initiated and officers for
the year will be installed this eve-
ning at the Union. Saturday night
they plan a party in the Ann Arbor
room of the League with Dick
Gerber's band providing the music.
They were active on campus un-
til 1941 returning this fall and
purchasing~ a house. These new
actives have pledged for a semes-
ter but they will continue to be
a colony until next fall.
The "Big Red" of Gomberg is
planning a sock hop for this Sat-
urday night preceded by an open-
open house.
A banquet and pre-party is in
store for Alpha Kappa Kappa
members and their dates before
the Caduceus Ball.
LITTLE CLUB TO OPEN
"Little Club" will open its
doors again this semester from
9 p.m. to midnight today in the
North Lounge of the Union.
Paul Brodie and his four piece
combo will be the featured
dance band.
Couples who would like to
dance in a sophisticated night
club atmosphere are invited to
attend. Tickets may be pur-
chased at the main desk of the
Union.
This is the first in a series of
six "Little Club" dance to be
presented every Friday night
until Spring Vacation.

SOCIAL SWING AGAIN:
Campus Houses To Hold
Record Dances, Parties

"Neo-Nonsense," a dance fea-
turing modern art decorations, is
on the agenda for Huber and
Taylor houses with Don Young
and his band furnishing the enter-
tainment.
In keeping with the season a
Valentine motif will prevail at the
Sigma Alpha Mu house as Earl
Pierson's band provides the music.
The Baptist Church will be the
scene of a square dance held by Psi
Omega.
Other houses will be holding
pre-parties before the Caduceus
Ball, while Delta Tau Delta, Phi
Alpha Kappa, Sigma Alpha Epsi-
lon, Theta Delta Chi, and Sigma
Chi will be holding informal re-
cord dances.

SAVE $289
ON TRIP TO
EUROPE
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trip to Europe . . . if you hurry!
See England, France, Italy, up to
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Travel now while you still can. Ap-
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Write today for FREE folder and
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$295-$1045
Space Limited! Write Today!
See your Local Agent or Write:
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WHY PAY
FOR
PARKING?
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J.G.P.-Tryouts for Junior Girls
Play will be held from 3 to 5 p.m.
today, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
tomorrow, and from 3 to 5 p.m. on
Monday.
SENIOR SOCIETY-There will
be a Senior Society meeting at
9:30 p.m. on Monday, and an
executive meeting at 8:30 p.m.
Members are requested to return
their money to the Alumni Office
immediately.
* * 4.
LEACUE-Petitioning for senior
positions in the League will be
held until 5 p.m. on Monday. In-.
terviewing for these positions ill
be held from Tuesday to Friday,
March 10.
* * *
WAA-Petitioning for W.A.A.
positions is now going on and
will continue until Wednesday,
Feb. 29. A mass meeting will be
held at 5:10 p.m. today in the
W.A.B. Petitions should be turned
in to the League (Jaylie Duke's
box) by March 1. Sheets will be
available at that time to sign up
for interviews.

I

NEW SHIPMENTS- of
USE*D TEXTBOOKS
arriving daily!
NEW BOOKS IF YOU PREFER
For that hard-to-find textbook
try

i

II

lessons. These classes are for all
students who are interested, in
learning how to play bridge or; who
wish to improve their game.
Faculty members and residents
of Ann Arbor who are interested
in bridge are also invited to par-
ticipate in these lessons.
BRIDGE LESSONS OFFEREDs
Beginning Tuesday the Wom-
en's League is offering bridge
lessons to allsstudents, faculty
and residents of Ann Arbor.
Starting at 7:30 p.m. the
classes will be held every Tues-
day for eight weeks, and will
include instruction in beginning
and intermediate bridge for
both individuals and groups.

SA N DL E R OF BOSTON BRINGS YOU THE YOUNGEST PUMP
IN THE WORLD. See 'the young short vamp, young and new widened
throatline, squared away... the young-and-slender shapely heel, looking
so much higher than it is. Everywhere, it's soft and flexible, light and
graceful. Wedgewood Blue - Apricot Red 10.95

F OLLET'I
MICHIGAN BOOKSTORE
322 South State

BOB GRAHAM, Mgr.

VAN BOVEN SHOES
17 NICKELS ARCADE

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THEY'RE HERE!
Those
"Snappits"
You asked for

SAECASHM ERE
R S95
SHORT SLEEVE PULLOVERS

OF 300
tSWEATERS
$P695
Long Sleeve Cardigans, Long Sleeve Pullovers (with
or without mock turtle neck) -- Plus Closeout of
novelty and dressmaker styles. Originally priced
21.95 to 29.95.

c/

Snap to any .Iength. you like at 2.25
PLASTIC PASTEL "SNAPPITS"
at 1.00

Reg. price

17.95

Also 1, 2 and 3-strand neck-
laces and dog collars in white,
pink, blue - plus earrings to
match from 1.00.
NAVY PEARL
DOG COLLARS
1- aid 2-strand at
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0 FROM TWO of the world's finest manufacturers of Cashmere sweaters. Most of tre sweaters are brand new, specially pur-
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0 ALL FIRST QUALITY, full fashioned cashmeres.
i COLOR RANGE includes spring pastels as well as basic year round shades. Shell pink, fern green, maize, white, cornflower,
black, light grey, raspberry, light blue, camel, oatmeal, amber, slate, lilac, turquoise, taupe . . . not all colors in all styles
but still an excellent selection.
* SIZES 34 to 40, and a limited number of size 42's in the long sleeve cardigan.

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