100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 17, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Y 17, 1956

TIl- MCIIIGAN DAILY

Y 17, lOSS THE MICHIGAN DAILY

U' PLANS IN FAR EAST:
Hatcher Describes Chopsticks, Courtesy In Orient
By LEE MARKS .... ..........,.....**- N

Susan B. Antony's Life
Dedicated To Suffrage

One of the skills acquired by
University President Harlan H.
Hatcher during his recent sojourn
to the Far East is an ability to
manipulate chop sticks.
"When I got over there I con-
formed exclusively. I gave up
knives and forks," President Hat-
cher noted smilingly.
Asked about his proficiency with
the Oriental eating implements,
President Hatcher replied, "I be-
came reasonably expert-at least
I got myself fed."
Notes Kindness
Kindness of government officials
in the countries visited was term-
ed by the President "most grati-
lying,,
As an example, he mentioned an
experience in the Philippines. The
President and his travelling com-
panions, Theodore Drew and Reg-
ent Charles S. Kennedy, were
lunching with Philippine President
Ramon Magsaysay.
"He asked us if we were going
to visit Bagio, the old Philippine
capitol where the Japanese sur-
rendered the Philippines. We re-
plied that we hadn't planned to
because we couldn't get trtanspor-
tation.
Furnished Private Plane
"When President Magsaysay
learned we couldn't get there he
insisted on furnishing us with a
private plane."
As a high point in his trip
through the Philippines, the Presi-
dent mentioned the plane return
from Bagio.
"We flew over Battan, right ov-
er the death march territory, and
then circled fallen Corregidor three
tufnes. You can still see the
wrecks of sunken Japanese ships.
"Seeing those blaces and the
final gaunt surrender of Corregi-
Meteoronomy
Details Told
J
(continued from page 1)
stitution that appeared in yester-
day's Daily. He hastened to add
that the amendment suggestion
was prompted by his legal battles
over gaining custody of his two
daughters. His ex-common law
wife is now caring for them.
Perusing his collections of ar-
ticles we discovered that he had
invented a unique and original
weather forecasting system called
"meteoronomy." Having always
had an interest in weather condi-
tions, we quickly asked him about
"meteoronomy." .
;'Well," he said, smiling >sadly
and removing the end of a badly
chewedl cigar from his thin lips,
"in 1949 I worked out a theory for
the coldest day in the year (Feb-
ruary 25) and gave it to the papers
in Boston as a prediction based on
'meteorofloiy.'
"But when February 25 came it
was one of the nicest days in years
and I haven't done anything more
since."
We were al set toleave when
B allengr ased us to dinner,
promising to caricature us. But,
after the strain of two classes
(in espitemology and metaphysics)
and learning the "Theories of
Magnetic Equilibrium and Meteor-
onomy," we felt somewhat non-
gregarious and politely declined.
Peace Conference
The Annual Working Conference
of the University Peace Center As-
sociation will be held at Judd Hall,
University of Chicago, on February
18 and 19.
The conference, which is spon-
sored by Hiram and Oberlin Col-
leges and the Universities of Chi-
cago and Wisconsin, is actually a
workshop session with lectures by

many prominent scientists and
professors.
The aim of this group is to get
peace centers established at other
universities.
Housing will be furnished free
ofecharge to all the delegates and
meals 'will cost fifty cents.
Further information may be
obtained from Mrs. Callahan at
the Office of Student Affairs; 1020
Administration Building.
Ann Arbor
City Market
Farm Fresh
Poultry and Eggs
WINTER VEGETABLES
AND WINTER FRUITS
OPEN EVERY SATURDAY*
DURING THE WINTER

LEFT TO RIGHT: DR. KENNEDY, DR. HATCHER, GENERAL C. L. CHENNAULT, THEODORE

By MARY ANN THOMAS
Susan B. Anthony has been call-
ed the greatest woman this coun-
try has ever produced, but
50 years after her death, her fame
is seldom remembered.
In many ways, however, her
fame has been preserved. A big
California tree was 'named after
her, monuments have been erected
in her honor and her statue stands
in the Hall of Fame. But more
than all else, she is remembered
for her greatesthachievement, wo-
man's suffrage.
Women of today, on the whole
take their right to vote as a
natural occurrance, without any
cognizance of the long years of
debate and maneuvering that it
took to win this right. Susan B.
Anthony was one of the women
who led that battle.
Born in 1820 in a small' New
England town, she did not enter
the suffrage movement early. She
was thirty before her friend Eliza-
beth Cady Stanton introduced her
to the principles of Jeffersonian
democracy, to which she remained
an avid adherant until her death.
A woman of action and aggres-
sive in ways, she devoted her life
to the cause. SI' traveled around
the country making impassioned
speeches, buttonholing lawmakers,
spreading her faith in the princi-
ples of democracy in which all
citizens should have the right to
Vote regardless of race or sex.
She lived her life almost entirely
without beauty. A confirmed
Quaker, her excursions into the
aesthetic were enjoyable but rare
and unnecessary. She had a real
Italian Club Meets
The first meeting of Il Circolo
Italiano this semester will be held
at 8 p.m. tonight -in Aud. A, An-
gell Hall.
Members will view the film "Il
Cristo Proibito." It was named as
one of the best foreign films of
1953 by the National Board of
Review.
Since this is the club's first
meeting, semester club member-
ships for those interested will be
available at the door for 50 cents.
The film is free for present mem-
I irs of the club.

allergy from romance and died a
spinster.
Susan B. Anthony lived a simple,
dedicated life, so much so that
friends often wondered how she
could manage. When she died in
1906 her total estate amounted to
only $4500, all of which she be-
queathed to the suffrage move-
ment.
Women were first allowed to
vote in 1920. Susan B. Anthony
did not live to see that day, but
she had given hey life to make
that day come.

dor made a marked impression,"
President Hatcher exclaimed.
Purpose Was Inspection
Main purpose of President Hat-
cher's recent one-month tour of
the Far East was inspection of
University operations in Manila.
The President, who returned
Jan. 29, expressed satisfaction with
the University's special program in
Public Administration carried out
in conjunction with the Univer-
sity of the 'Philippines.
"After a period of transition,
the University of the Philippines
will carry out the program by
themselves," the President declar-
ed.
In Formosa, the President in-
spected the University of Taiwan.
"It is a growing institution, con-
stantly expanding."
Asks to See Dorms
After visiting the Medical School
and the School of Engineering,
President Hatcher "asked to see the
dormitories.
"Their newest dorm, which holds
about 450 men, cost between three
and four hundred thousand dol-
lars.
(South Quad, with accommoda-
tions for 1200, cost $5,700,000.)
"We got there about lunchtime.
Their kitchen, far smaller than
anything we're accustomed to,
consists of three brick, kiln-like
structures. One was filled with
rice, one with fish stew and the
last with steaming vegetable stew.
"The students brought in their
canteen kits, spooned out the food
and sat on benches while they
ate it.

"Their rooms are spacious and
have four double deck beds lining
the walls. In the .center is a long
table where they study.
"I thought of the gleaming
stainless steel appointments we
have in our kitchens and consider
standard," the President remarked.
President Hatcher, Regent Ken-
nedy and Drew had tea with
Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek
and his wife during their stay in
Formosa.
"We visited with them for about
an hour and a half and, at Mad-
ame Chiang's request, visited an
orphanage she runs for 300 home-
less children.
"They (Generalalissimo Chiang
Kai-shek and his wife) are truly
the wonderful people their ad-
mirers have declared them to be,"
President Hatcher commented.
President Visits Akahito
In Tokyo the President met
Crown Prince of Japan Akahito,
who visited the University two
years ago.

"He immediately, asked about
Wally Weber (fresiman football
coach) and how our team had
done."
During the trip the President's
wife and children stayed in Hono-
lulu.
President Hatcher said visits to
University clubs in Honolulu, Ma-
nila, Hong Kong, Formosa and
Tokyo were "one of the high spots
of the trip."
"Numbering between 100 and
150, they are imbued with the old
Michigan spirit. We found a
heavy percentage of leadership.
Wherever we went, the Michigan
Club members were the doctors,
engineers, government leaders and
businessmen.
"In Taipei," the President noted,
"17 members of Parliament and
two vice-ministers were former
University graduates."
President Hatcher noted he met
many recent graduates, such as
Chuck Elliot, '52, former Daily
Managing Editor and Eric Vetter,
'53, former Daily City Editor.

Pioneer and leading producer of silicones
will have a representative on campus
February 22 to interview 1956 graduates.
Contact PLACEMENT OFFICE for interview appointment

Mo

DAY AND NIGHT

CLASSES START
FEBRUARY 20
TYPING OPTIONAL
Over 400 Schools in U.S. will assist you in review or placement.
ENROLL TODAY IN NEXT CLASS.
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
Founded in 1915 Phone NO 8-7831 State and William Sts.

What's doing
at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft

Did you get missed on Valentine's Day?
HERE'S A 14 'CONSOLATION PRIZE FREE!

." *
. \. j. ",
* U 9 *e

r,.
49

.6
'("V

-j °
...

ro

Jet Engines Tested
in World's Most Complete -
Privately Owned Turbine Laboratory
Located on the bank of the Connecticut River
at East Hartford is a singular development facil-
ity-the Andrew Willgoos Turbine Laboratory.
Here, behind windowless, thick concrete walls,
many types of engineers find a never-ending
challenge in the development and testing of
advanced aircraft engines.
Test methods used by Pratt & Whitney Air-
craft in their unique laboratory are highly com-
plex. Tests are conducted on full-scale experi-
mental engines at simulated altitudes up to
76,000 feet. Extremely high speed airflow, with
pressure and temperature accurately controlled,
duplicates speeds as high as Mach 2.75. To re-
produce such prodigious flight conditions, ex-
traordinary equipment had to be devised. For
example, a 21,500-hp driving dynamometer sup-
plies the enormous power needed to test jet
engine compressors over a range of speeds from Andrew Willgoos 1
800 rpm to 16,000 rpm. Cooling water fr
The time lapse between development and the rate of 160,(
production of hew engines is reduced consider- a million people.
ably by the advanced facilities of the Willgoos
Laboratory. An outstanding example of results
achieved through concentrated engineering ef-
fort and complete research support is the Pratt'
& Whitney Aircraft J-57 turbojet. Today the ,
unchallenged leader in its field, the J-57 is
merely the forerunner of greater aircraft engines
that will power the preeminent military and
commercial aircraft of the future.

. ''-.A

f"
1I

I p
7f
n
f
GIG 04 *$
"
o 'tom p'f !
?-
x3p
TART
s p
)MER

B-45 flying test-bed is shown here with an experimental jet engine suspended directly berneath
the bomb bay. Its regular engines are idled while in-flight performance of the turbojet is
observed and recorded. The perfect cc'mplement to the complex ground-testing facilities of
the Willgoos Laboratory, the flying test-bed is another vital factor in reducing engine
development time.

ONLY ONE
BROKEN H
PER CUSTC

DID YOU SEE THE
DE|"A aL'"DiC

I

,,,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan