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May 04, 1956 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-05-04

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MAY, MAY 4,1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE IV

FRIDAY, MAY 4, 19!6 PAGE ~1V

Students To Discuss
South African Issues

Group Head

To

Give

Talk

In the Union of South Africa
two million whites are exploiting
and policing 12 million natives and
Indian immigrants.
The problem has been a signifi-
cant one for the other African
nations who have been concerned
with its solution.. Forceful inter-
vention has often been suggested
to bring about justice.
Graduate students from the
United States, Africa and India
will weigh the desirabilities of
armed intervention in the South
African situation in a round-table
discussion at 8 p.m. today in the
International Center.
David Neal of Liberia, who will
participate in the discussion, re-
marked that the "use of force
would be premature; the situation
will rectify itself."
Resentment Rising
"Pressure is rising," the African
continued, "and increasing resent-
ment on the part of the younger
generation wfll bring an explosion
at some future date."
Neal added that the nations of
Africa haven't enough strength,
economically or politically, to enter
into a war. Armed intervention
would require aid from other coun-
tries, probably causing a split of
opinions in the West.
"If the aid," Neal concluded,
"would not come from the Western
powers the African nations would
be forced to appeal to the Com-
munist countries."
To Carry on Discussion
Other participants in the Inter-
national Students Association
sponsored discussion Are Solomon
Quaynor and Charles Lemeh of the
Gold Coast, Buddha Govindaraj
from India and Theodore Schwartz
and Murray Melvin of the United
States.
This discussion is sixth of a
series between American students
and students from other national
groups and is designed to clarify
misconceptions about the political
and cultural patterns of those na-
tional groups.
Most of the topics selected will

be of a controversial political na-
ture.
Acting as moderator, Alice Spuel-I
her of Switzerland, chairman of
the entire discussion series, will
pose questions for the other par-
ticipants to answer. Audience par-
ticipation will be invited.
Throughout the year other dis-
cussions of a similar nature will
be scheduled.
Continuing until the end of the
spring semester, they will deal
consecutively with Pakistan and
Korea.

National Co-Chairman'
Will Attend Reception
Mrs. Edison Dick, naitonal co-
chairman of the Stevenson for
President organization will be hon-
ored with a reception at 7:30 p.m.
Monday, in the Hussey Rm. of the
League.
Sponsored by the University's
newly-formed Students for Stev-
enson group, the reception is open
to the public.
Mrs. Dick will deliver an infor-
mal talk on the progress Adlai
Stevenson is making with his cam-
paign efforts. A discussion period
will follow.
"We hope as many students and
Ann Arbor residents as possible
will be able to meet Mrs. Dick
and participate in the discussion,"
David Marlin, president of Stu-
dents for Stevenson remarked.
The guest speaker is a graduate
of the University of Chicago where
she concentrated in political sci-
ence and history.
Serving as co-chairman of the
women's division of Stevenson for
Governor in 1948, Mrs. Dick was

Jro un'I
flownt

Places for you and your date
to go. 11
In Rm. 3G of the Union, couples
or singles may display their bridge
skill at weekly tournaments from
7:45 p.m .to midnight. Money
prizes will be awarded winning
teams.
* * *
Appearing at May Festival this
weekend in Hill Auditorium will be
several musical artists, and the
Philadelphia Orchestra.
At 8:30 p.m. tonight, featured
artists will be conductor Eugene
Ormandy and soprano Inge Borkh.
Mr. Ormandy will conduct the
concerts at 2:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.
tomorrow. Appearing at the mati-
nee will be Hilde Gueden, soprano,
the Festival Youth Chorus and
Marguerite Hood, conductor. To-
morrow evening, Zino Francescatti,
violinist, will appear.
* * *
At the Union Ballroom the ISA
will offer the International Ball,
"Dancing Under the Stars," from
9 p.m. to 1 tomorrow. The dance
is open to all and will be semi-
formal.

Maitby To
By SUE RAUNHEIM
Saturday, May 14, Richard Malt-
by and his Orchestra will be on
hand to provide dance music for
the Inter-Fraternity Council Ball.
The conductor-arranger was
born on June 26, 1914 in Chicago,
Ill., the youngest of five sons.
During his early grade school days,
he began his association with
music when he played cornet in
the school orchestra.
Upon completion of high school,
Maltby entered Northwestern Uni-
versity where he took liberal art
courses. He did not plan to enter
the music profession until he met
Virginia Hosegood, who later be-
came his wife, and insisted that he
dedicate his talent to music.
Combined Studies, Tours
He left Northwestern after one
year to work with local dance
bands while he continued his study
of advanced harmony and orches-
tration under Leo Sowerby. On
completion of his courses, he tour-
ed with several dance bands in-
cluding Little Jack Little, Roger
Pryor and Bob Strong.
Maltby joined WBBM in Chi-
cago as staff arranger in 1940.
He gained valuable experience
there by writing for diversified
groups.
Besides his work at WBBM,
Maltby found time to continue ar-
ranging in the dance band medium
for bands in the Chicago area. One
of his compositions, "Six Flats
Unfurnished," was recorded by
Benny Goodman and proved to be
one of Goodman's biggest selling
records.
Acted As Conductor-Arranger
Paul Whiteman placed Maltby
with a broadcasting company in
Chicago as a conductor-arranger.
After moving to New York City,
Maltby was in great demand as an
arranger on many television and
radio shows as well as backing
singers on recordings.
In 1951, Maltby was asked to do
a series of recordings called "Jazz
Classics." He was allowed to ex-
periment with all combinations
and he used his imagination to
write original compositions. He
has recorded over 250 sides, and
many of these numbers are used
in his dance library today.
One of his first recordings, "St.
Louis Blues Mambo," established
him commercially as an artist of
great stature. In June of 1955,
Maltby organized his traveling
band and hit the road.
Records for Several Companies
Now establsihed as one of the big
bands in the country, he continued
to record for several national re-
cord companies, turning out tunes
that are good listennig, danceable
and always in good taste. His re-
cord, "Man With the Golden Arm,"
is number nine on hit lists across
the country this week.
Maltby has played the "one-

Entertain at IFC Ball

nighter" circuit at many of the
majo rcollege dances. He has also
played at the Statler Hotel for a
long period of time.
In 1955 Maltby wrote the music
for, and conducted, the Vaughn
Monroe Color TV Show and also
appeared with his band.
Guest Conductor
He has been guest conductor on
the National Radio Fan Club sev-

30, 1935 in St. Petersburg, Fla.
She started singing at the age of
15 with her father's orchestra at
the Coloseum in St. Petersburg,
and fro mthere went on to solo
spots in local clubs.
Vocalist Wins Concert
In May, 1955, a national maga-
zine conducted a search for a
vocalist for Maltby's Orchestra.
Franky was chosen out of hun-
dreds of applicants and made her
debut with the band at the Cafe
Rouge of the Statler Hotel in New
York City.
Since then, she has been touring
with Richard Maltby. Her first
commercial recording was Heart
of Paris.
Miss Crockett has created sensa-
tions wherever she travels because
of her charm, poise and beauty.
Her excellent singing voice has
added greatly to the prestige of
the band and it is with great pleas-
ure that the IFC Ball committee
awaits her.
WAA Prepares
For Lantern Night
Twenty seven sororities and in-
dependent women's residences,
singing a total of 35 songs will vie
for first place honors at the an-
nual Lantern Night eliminations
to be held Wednesday in Hill Aud-
itorium.
Approximately ten houses will
be selected to compete for the sil-
ver loving cup and the posture
cup to be given to the first place
winners of the respective cate-
gories at Lantern Night which will
be held Tuesday, May 15, in Hill
Auditorium.

IDEAL GIFTS
JEWELRY WOOD CARVING
IVORY ARTICLES
COPPER AND BRASS ARTICLES
INDIA PRINTS
CHINESE ROBES AND JACKETS
and many other articles
OPEN TILL 9:00
INDIA ART SHOP
330 MAYNARD STREET

Annual Home Tour
Members of the Ann Arbor
Women's City Club are sponsor-
-ing the fifth annual Home Tour
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today.
This provides entertainment
for friends and relatives of stu-
dents who are i nthe city for
the May Festival. It is open to
all students, faculty, friends and
relatives.

Ann Arbor
City Market
Farm Fresh
Poultry and Eggs
WINTER VEGETABLES
AND WINTER FRUITS
OPEN EVERY SATURDAY
DURING THE WINTER

r7

I

RICHARD MALTBY
eral times and was guest "Star of
the Day" on both Monitor and
Weekday Shows.
According to present day stand-
ards, Maltby has a large band. It
consists of four trumpets, three
trombones, five reeds, four rhythm
(piano, bass guitar and drums)
and a vocalist, Miss Franky Croc-
kett. He plays the cornet.
Franky Crockett was born July

FORGET YOUR EXAMS:
Spring Formals To Feature
Tropical, Cruise Themes

MRS. EDISON DICK

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also active on the political scene
as co-chairman of the National
Volunteers for Stevenson in 1952.
Her appearance in Ann Arbor
marks the beginning of a series of
activities the University Students
for Stevenson are planning. They
hope to bring a nationally known
speaker later in the semester.
Since the group's birth in March
of this year, when a handful of
students interested in furthering
Stevenson's campaigning banded
together, it has grown to approxi-
mately 75 members. .
"Anyone who is interested in
becoming a member may sign up
at the reception, Monday," Mar-
lin said. He added that interest
is the only criterion prospective
members must possess.

In celebration of a spring that
was long in arriving, East Quad-
rangle and Taylor House of South
Quadrangle are planning spring
formals for tomorrow evening.
East Quad . .
"Blue Lagoon," East Quad's all
campus semi-formal dance will be
held from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
For couples who enjoy dancing
outdoors, a portable dance floor
has been secured. Hal Singer and
his band plus a huge fountain con-
taining South Sea Island flamingos
will help create the atmosphere
for these couples.
For those who prefer the indoor
life, Carol Kenny and her combo
will be entertaining in one of the
dining rooms. Hanging Spanish
moss, exotic birds, -and palm trees
will also add to the tropical scene.
One dining room will be trans-
formed into a club where refresh-
ments will be served.
Tickets for the dance can be
obtained from social chairman of
East Quad houses and at the door.
Marilyn Whitman and Drake
Duane are serving as general
chairmen.
Taylor House ...
Taylor house will start their
big weekend with a Cruise Picnic
and Supper at Island Park to-'
night. Tomorrow evening couples
will board the SS United States
for a "Moonlight Cruise."
The ship will sail at 9 p.m., dock-
ing again at 1 a.m. Red Johnson

and his band will be on hand to
provide the entertainment.
From the moment they board
the gang plank couples will find
themselves in a sea-going atmos-
phere. Posters will decorate all
walls. Menu covers, along with
other favors supplied by several
steamship liens, will adorn the
dining room.
The dance floor will have a low-
ered ceiling composed of angel
hair to achieve a cloud like effect.
Gardens, pools, and a fountain
complete with its own goldfish will
be seen from the dance floor.
A 15 foot smokestack with pen-
nants flying will be placed out-
side the quad on the dining room
roof to add the final touch to the
decorations.
secrtariai to your college
accomplishmnsfyou are ambitious
to get and hold one of those better
positions in s eiabous fr solgeW n .
rie oll r oege n o e
GIBBS GIRLS AT WORK
KATHARINE-
SECRETARIAL.
Boston 16,21 Marlborough St. New York 17, 230 Park Ave.
Providence 6,155 AngellSt MontclairNJ.. 33 Plymouth St.

If so, we can help YOU work out the
details of your printed needs.
We offer beautiful wedding invita-
tions, announcements, and complete
accessories, -- printed, embossed, or.
engraved.
RAMSA.Lbery PRINTEINC.
RA S Y P I T R,119 E. Liberty NO 8-7900

I

On tAe7 0a~
By SANNA SCHEINFELD "Roaring Twenties" parties of Al-
Onme would think that Springpha Sigma Phi and Delta Tau Del-
wasnheealasthwinthatepdgta, and the "Toga" party of Sigma
wa hre a ast wit all the pledg Nu, Amid the sewer decorations
are planned for this weekend.of the Phi Kappa Tau house, the
are laned or tis eeknd. costumed members and their cos-
"Spring Fever" is the theme for tumed dates will be dancing at the
the Delta Sigma Phi pledge for- annual "Apache Brawl." Spring
mal. Phi Sigma Delta is seasonal costumes?
with its "Spring Symposium" for- Red carnations will bloom at
mal. It might be Spring at that! the Tau Kappa Epsilon's annul
An unusual theme is that of the "Red Carnation Ball" and Ban-
Zeta Psi formal. As one member quet. It must be Spring-flowers!
said, "The dance will be 'Hell.'" Alpha Gamma Delta's spring
Besides a formal, Tau Delta Phi formal will feature "Lullaby of
is having a Spring pajama party Birdland." It has to be Spring-
with appropriate costumes and birds!
decorations. Maybe it is spring! It is alumni weekend at the Chi
The newlyrecognized chapter of Phi house. There's another sure
Phi Epsilon Pi is celebrating with sign of Spring-alumni! :
a dinner-dance and picnic. Gomberg and Kleinstuck plan
Theta Delta Chi and Triangle to celebrate the weather together
also plan pledge formals. with a picnic and a dance.
Costumes are in order at the It is Spring !
. .

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