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May 04, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-05-04

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FRIDAY, MAY 4,1956

..... .....

PAGE THREE

- FRIDAY, MAY 4, 1956 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

__

t

FRATERNITY RELATIONS COUNSELOR:
Dean Zerman Recalls Fraternity Life

By RILL HANEY

Q.

"I thought fraternities were for
rich boys, drinkers, and snobs."
A rather unusual comment com-
ing from assistant dean of men
in charge of fraternities, William.
S. Zerman. But this was his opin-
ion of the Greek letter men when
he graduated from the army to
the Michigan campus in 1946.
"The last thing I wanted to do
was get in a fraternity here," Zer-
man explained. "But my only
two friends were rushing, and they
more or less dragged me along."
In those days it cost a dollar
to sign up for rushing, and though
Zerman thought at the time "it
was a waste of money," it turned
out to be "my best investment."
Voted Outstanding Senior
Zerman's college and post-col-
lege records show what effect "the
fraternity way of life" has had
on him and he on it. He was
corresponding secretary for the
Phi Gams' and his final year was
voted "outstanding senior."
"I worked hard at the frater-
nity," Zerman said, "not only be-
cause I grew to appreciate the
values of that way of living, but
because you only get out of some-
thing what you put into it."
Zerman's reward was 17 job of-
fers waiting for him . after he.
graduated with a journalism de-
gree. He turned down high pay-
ing positions in sales, sales rela-
tions, and public relations to take
a post paying $200 a month as
national field secretary for the
Phi Gamma Delta national system.
More than 100,000 miles of trav-
eling in two years gave Zerman
"an excellent insight" into stu-
dent personnel relations and op-
erations of over 90 colleges and
universities in which he lived.
Worked on Campus Activities
Work on campus activities as a
student at Michigan provided an
important foundation for the in-.
sight into personnel relations
which post-graduate positions sup-
plemented.
"All my life I wanted to come to
Michigan and play football,"' Zer-
man reminisced, "but one day Al
Wistert and Lenny Ford joined
forces on a block that turned all
my football dreams to nightmares.
I can still see those guys coming
at me."
Zerman focused his attentions
then on the type of work he has
followed ever since, public rela-
tions and organization. The year
he was sales manager of the Mi-
chiganensian the yearbook rung
up more sales than it had before
or since.
Revised Union Opera
Then he set to work on revising
the Union Opera and spent two
years turning the first show, "Frog-
gy Bottom" into a success which
set the pace for the brief pros-
perity of the Opera.

"Actually it'isn't so unusual that
I find myself in this kind of a job
now," Zerman explained. "I've
been doing some sort of p'ublic re-
lations work all my life it seems."
Earns Respect and Praise
Zerman's success in the "dean-
ing business" at M i c h i g a n
have earned him respect and praise
from I e a d i n g administrators
throughout the country.
He has mastered a new type of
job in a field (student-personnel
relations) which has just recently
"come into its own as a specialized
business and is now being accept-
ed into the framework of higher
education."
Zerman will be leaving this cam-
pus this summer for Ohio Wes-
leyan where he will be Assistant
Dean of Men in 1956-57,and Dean
of Men in 1957-58. t
But in the four years he has
served Michigan he has impressed
the University that there is defi-
nitely a necessity for a full-time
fraternity counselor and that this
man's success is realized in direct
proportion to the amount of time
he spends on his job.

Mimes Tap
Thespians
In the morning, in the night.
Sons of Thespis show their might,
With chimes of Mimes,
They came a tapping,
Broke down the doors
With noisy rapping,
In, their quest for tragedy and
mirth,
Selected those who showed their
worth.
Enacted a drama in two parts
In honor of the actor's art.
The play is cast,
The curtain falls,
The chosen few have heard their
call!
Mimes have spoken!
Thus Thespis looked with favor
upon:
Brawling Bogart Brehm, Croon-
ing Como Crawford, Flashy Fisher
Florence, He-man Hudson Horner,
Kind-hearted Kerr Ketchum, Kud-
dly Killgallen Killeen, Krazy
Kreisler Knox, Misty Mansfield
McKinney, Masterful Mason Me-
dalie, Merry Merman Moore, Man-
handling Monroe ,Moore, Omnipo-
tent Olivier Oates, Ruthless Rath-
bone Russell, Sizzling Stanwyck
Smith, Sinister Sinatara Stone.

Segregation
Pressured
ByCourt
(Continued from Page 1)
"We don't have to ask that
people become completely unpre-
judiced," the psychologist: added,
"just that they become less an-
tagonistic."
Refusing to predict how long
the desegregation process might
take, Prof. Peak did believe it will
take the longest in states like Ala-
bama, Mississippi, Georgia and
South Carolina where there is
"more resistance, more ingrained
prejudice and (she emphasized) a
,greater proportion of Negroes.
"It will take time," she explain-
ed, "The Supreme Court meant
with its demand for all deliberate
speed that there ought to be just
as much pressure as there can be
without an explosion.
"There should always be pres-
sure," she summarized, "but it
should be adjusted to the local
situation.",

"

TAKE
A
BREAK'

KEG BEER
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114 E. William St.
Between Main and
Fourth Ave.
Phone 7191
OPEN
Daily 10 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Sundays Noon to 7 P.M.
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-Daily-Jim Owens
BILL ZERMAN-Pipes, personality, public relations and some
times pugnacity have characterized Zerman's University career.

"Even then it was a struggle to
get complete coordinated support
of those University components
which should have been interested
in the revival of one of Michigan's
oldest and better known tradi-
tions," Zerman explained.
With such college experiences
and two years of public relations
work for Phi Gamma Delta behind
him, Zermai was a "wanted man"
or colleges sorely needing better
student-administration relations.
Offered Position
In August, 1951, he was offered
a counselling position by the Dean
of Men at Purdue University.
"I wasn't interested," Zerman
said, "because I had heard stu-
dent - personnel workers didn't
make enough money 'to live de-
cently on, and I found this, in
many instances to be true; especi-
ally for the number of hours you
put in."
The ordinary work week for
such a job is usually 50 hours a
week and oten 60, plus the time
in the evenings which are usually
spent at banquets and meetings.
Because Zerman considered him-
self a "full-blooded Michigan man"
he contacted some of his friends
in Ann Arbor for advice.
Erich A. Walter, then dean of
students, told him if he was going
to do this kind of work why not
do it for Michigan?"
No Appropriation
The only snag preventing such
a coalition was that no such posi-
tion existed at the University at
that time and the Regents were

reluctant to pass an appropriation
for the new office.
So Zerman accepted a position
with the National Association of"
Manufacturers in Detroit where
he "received a tremendous insight
into labor-management relations
in this state."
Then in August 1952 Walter
called Zerman and told him the
job as assistant dean of men in
charge of fraternities was open
and Zerman "jumped at the
chance."
Three Receive
Wilson Award
For Teaching
Three University students have
received National Woodrow Wil-
son Fellowships.
H. Donald Cameron, '56, Salva-
tore U. Manzo, '56 and Norman C,
Thomas, '53, received the one-year
awards given to those "demon-
strating marked promise for the
teaching profession and possess-
ing the highest qualities of intel-
lect, character and personality."
The awards are for $1250 plus
tuition and are sponsored by the
Association of Graduate schools.
Two of the winners will do grad-
uate work at Princeton Universi-
ty. Cameron will continue in Clas-
sics and Thomas in political sci-
ence.

4

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