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April 19, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-04-19

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p

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TEE

Pitchers Lead Diamondmen to 5-2

Win Over ND
I,

Indiana Will
Threaten ''
Net Chanps
By FRED WERTHHEIMER
As the opening of the Big Ten
tennis season drawsnear, Michi-
gan's squad is faced with the
perennial problem of a champion.
Its perfect record, attained in
makes this year's veteran squad
acapturing last year's Big Tean title,
team to beat. Indiana especi-
will be out to regain the crown
wicn.it had held for three years
prior to Michigan's sweep in 1955.
According to Coach Bill Murphy
the Hoosiers, along with North-
western and Illinois, will afford
the Wolverines their top opposi-
tion. Iowa, led by returning letter-
men James Andrews and Gene
SNadig must be considered as an
outside contender despite the fact
that they compiled an unimpres-
sive 2-5 record last year.
With two inexperienced men
playing at number one and num-
ber two singles, Indiana, at first
glance, does not seem to be a seri-
ous threat. However, Mike Field,
sensational sophomore formerly
ranked number one in Western
Junior singles is expected to be one
of Barry McKay's roughest oppon-
ents this year.
Bill Petrick, also a sophomore,
will play number two singles and
team with Field in the number one
doubles. Add to.this captain Carl
Dentice who has not lost a Big
Ten match in two years and you
have the nucleus of a "possible
champion.''
Northwestern will place most of
their hopes of defeating Michigan
behind Al Kuhn. Big Ten singles.
Tchampionrin 1954, and conqueror
of MacKay in last year's Big Ten
meet, Kuhn, will have to master
Michigan's ]Davis Cup hopeful
again if the Wildcats expect to
finish at the head of the field.
Paul Bennett, Jr. and Keith
Anderson, returning lettermen will
* also handle top positions on the
squad.
The Wolverines' insurmountable
strength and depth however,
should go far in insuring a repeatI
of 1955's victorious ways.

SPRAINS ANKLE IN SCRIMMAGE:

Herrnstein Hurt As Spring Football DrillsProgress

By BRUCE BENNETT
Husky John Herrnstein, the pile-
driving fullback who was the sen-
sation of last fall's freshman squad,
became the Wolverines' first
casualty of the spring season yes-I
terday when he sprained his ankle
during a scrimmage.
Herrnstein, who is rated by
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan as one
of the top candidates for the vital
fullback position, will miss the
next three or four drills, according
to the Michigan mentor,

Oosterbaan's two major experi-
ments-Ron Kramer at right half
and Mike Rotunno at center. Both
saw considerable action at their
new posts and turned in work-
manlike performances.
Kramer gave the coaches a
brief scare when he failed to get
up after a pile up. As it turned
out, he only had the wind knocked
out of him, but it was feared at
first that he might have suffered
a reoccurrence of the rib injury
which sidelined him for two games
last fall.
Oosterbaan said that he plans to
scrimmage the squad every day
from now on, with special empha-j
sis on the passing attack a d'
integrating several players at new
positions.

Bowler's Leave
Michigan's bowling team
leaves today, under the spon-
sorship of the Union, to com-
pete in the Big Ten Tourna-
ment to be held on April 20-21
at Iowa City.
Team members, chosen by an
18 game elimination previous
to Spring Vacation are Bud
Beck, Don Riesman, Irwin
Wagner, Jim Godfrey, and Fred
Gordon.
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Loses Valuable Experience
While the injury itself, is not;
serious, the fact that he will miss
several day's work is bad, since
the time allotted for spring prac-
-Daily-Dick Gaskill tice is limited.
DON POLOSKEY, WHO shared the pitching duties with winner Otherwise, the initial scrimmage
Bill Thurston in yesterday's contest with Notre Dame, fires a of the spring session went along
pitchout to catcher Gene Snider. Both Poloskey and Thurston as well as could be expected for
pitced ecellnt bll.this time of year'. Osterbaan stated
pitched excellent ball. 'Ithat the play was ragged, espec-
ially the passing, but attributed
Irish Held To F e Hits this to the fact it was only the
Irts Hel 10 ivethird day of drills.
The quarerbacking was handled,I
In 35 DegreeWeather
(Continued from Page 1)
then in position to score when Pol-
In the fifth frame the Wolver- oskey hit a deep grounder to the
rsecond baseman.

I --Daily-Peter Song
SCRIMMAGE YESTERDAY FEATURED RON KRAMER (LEFT)
IN HIS NEW POSITION AT RIGHT HALF-BACK.

for the most part, by Jim VanPelt
and Bdb Ptacek. The 200 pound
Ptacek showed the group of in-
terested onlookers some superb
blocking a vital asset for the sig-
nal calling position in the Michi-
gan system.
Byers, Sisinyak Impressive
Meanwhile, at fullback, Herrn-
stein's absence gaveJim Byers and
Gene Sisinyak a chance to dem-
onstrate their abilities and bath

drew Oosterbaans praise for their
fine play.
The scrimmage was also the first.
test under game conditions for

fl

tops in spring wear

Benedict reached first on an error
and then stole second. Fox walked,
and Tommelein sacrificed the run-
ners along with a good bunt.r Tip-
pery was intentionally passed, fill-
ing the'bases.
Boros then forced Benedict at
the plate, but in attempting the
double play, Notre Dame's catcher
threw wide to first allowing Fox
to round third and score. Al Sig-
man rolled one back to the pitcher
for the third out.
Fine base-running by Bob Seal-
by yielded Michigan's fifth run.
Sealby led off the sixth inningl
with a double. On the next play,
Snider grounded to the third base-
man. Ordinarily Sealby would have
held the bag, but he outfaked the
third sacker and advanced on the
latter's throw to first. He was

Defense Strong
Three errors in a game tends to
make the defense appear weak
when glancing over the statistics,G
but Michigan looked far from poor
in the field.
Highlighting the field play were
three double plays. Tippery to
Benedict to Sealby accounted for
two of them, and in the third
Benedict scooped up a grounder
near the bag, stepped on it and
fired to first, edging the runner
by two steps.
Statistics
NOTRE DAME

Dirty Buck
W hite Buck

r
I

AB R
Carideo, ss ....4 0
Hurley,2b .... 4 0
Cusack, rf .... 4 0
Kohurst, c .... 3 0
Nespo, cf .... 4 0
Jaeb, 3b ..... 3 1
Lesso, -b .... 3 0
Yaeger, If .... 3 0
Bujnowski, p.. 3 1
Totals........ 31 2

H
2
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
5

l

POPULAR CHOICES:
Sports Staff Picks Dodgers,
Yankees To Win Titles Again

"We, too!"
That's all the Daily Sports Stiff
can add to the nationwide accla-
mation of Brooklyn and New York
as favorites to retain their major
league titles in 1956.
Of the 31 staff members who
voted before the beginning of the
season, 25 named the World
Chamipon Dodgers to finish at the
top of the National League. There

were 21 ballots expecting the
Yankees to repeat in tle American
League.
On the basis of crediting eight
points for first, seven for second,
six for third and so on, the Dodg-
ers received a total of 240 out of
248 possible points. The Yankees
total was only a shade less-237.

MICHIGAN AB
Benedict, ss .. 3
Fox, cf ........3
Tommelein, if . 3
Tippery, 2b .. 3
Boros, 3b .... 3
Sigman, rf 3
Sealby, lb .. 4
Snider, c .... 4
Thurston, p 2
Poloskey, p .. 2
Totals.........30
Notre Dame . 010
MICHIGAN . 3001

RBI
0
1
0
0
0
0
I
0
0
2
RBI
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
4'

R H.
1 0
2 2
1 1
0 1
0 1
0 0
1 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
5 7
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Following
rankings by

is the list of complete
the sports staff:

Brooklyn .........
Milwaukee ...:....
St. Louis ..........
New York .......
Philadelphia ....
Chicago..........
Pittsburgh........
New York .........
Cleveland .........
Boston ........
Chicago..........
Detroit...........
Kansas City .......
Baltimore ........
Washington.....

NATIONAL LEAGUE
1 2 3 4 5
25 4 2 0 0
4 15 8 3 1
0 7 10 8 5
2 4 8 7 7
0 0 1 8 7
0 1 2 4 7
0 0 0 1 4
0 0 0 0 0
AMERICAN LEAGUE
21 9 1 0 0
3 12 7 9 0
4 6 15 5 1
3 4 6 12 6
0 0 2 5 23
0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0

6
0
1
3
9
13
5
0
0
0
0
1
23
4
3

0
0
0
0
0
3
14
8
0
0
0
0
0
4
16
11

8
0
0
0
0
0
1
7
23
0
0
0
0
0
3
11
17

Total
240
204
172
164
113
113
71
39

5
7

21
3

MAJOR LEAGUE SCORES
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Boston 8, Baltimore 4
New York 9, Washington 5
NATIONAL LEAGUE
New York 5, Pittsburgh 4
No other games played.
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