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April 18, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE M

WEI~NSDAYAPRI 18, 956 UE MW1GAN AILYPA-E WIRR

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4

Yanks Triumph in Opener 10-4
Dodgers Fall Victim to Phillies

Is)
S

Kansas City Downs Detroit;
White Sox Edge Out Indians

FASHION.

COMPLETE
RESTRING & REPAIR
SERVICE

By The Associated Press
Mickey Mantle'became the first
batter in history to send two
homeruns over Griffith Stadium's
distant centerfield fence in a single
game.
He led the New York Yankees
to a 10-4 opening day victory over
the Washington Senators.
Philadelphia 8, Brooklyn 6
Meanwhile Brooklyn's p r o u d
world champions almost forgot to
raise their flag as they went down
8-6 before the erratic pitching of
the Phillies' Robin Roberts. Phila-
delphia batters routed Don New-
combe in the third for five runs
and were never in danger after
that inning.
Kansas City 2, Detroit 1
The Kansas City Athletics topped
Detroit 2-1 on a two-run pinch-
hit of Gus Zernial, although the
Tigers outhit Kansas City eight to
six.
Frank Lary scored the loser's
only run on a home run in the
fifth.
Boston 8, Baltimore 1
Ted Williams, making his first
opening day appearance in four
years, slammed two doubles and
a single to aid the Boston Red
Sox's 8-1 victory over Baltimore.
Boston outhit the Orioles 16-8

the winning run. Catcher Sherm
Lollar, batted three for three.
New York (N) 4, Pittsburgh 3
The New York Giant's Johnny
Antonelli led his team to a 4-3 win
over Pittsburgh as he pitched a
six-hitter and contributed a home-
run.
Milwaukee 6, Chicago (N) 0
Hank Aaron and Joe Adcock
turned in homers to lead the Mil-
waukee Braves as they shutout
the Chicago Cubs 6-0. Lew Bur-
dette gets credit for the win, af-
ter allowing the Cubs only five
safeties.
Besides his home run, 'Aaron
took hitting honors with two for
three times at bat.
St. Louis 4, Cincinnati 2
Stan Musial connected for a
two-run homer in the ninth in-
ning to give the St. Louis Cardi-
nals a 4-2 decision over Cincin-
nati.

JOHN NARCY, newly elected
captain of the 1956-57 Michigan
swimming team, has been a top
member of Bruce Harlan's diving
crew over the past two seasons.
A junior in the School of Educa-
tion hailing from Gary, Indiana,
Narcy succeeds this year's co-
captains Mike Delaney and John
O'Reilly.

Diamrondmen
Snowed Out;
Await ,Irish
By HANK ROSENBAUM
Mother Nature didn't cooperate
yesterday as the University of
Michigan baseball team was snow-
ed out of action.
The scheduled game with West-
ern Michigan, last year's NCAA
runner-up was canceled because
of Ann Arbor's unusual spring
weather.
Coach Ray Fisher is fervently
hoping that the team will be able
to face Notre Dame today (game
time, 3:30) because of the squad's
need for experience under actual
playing conditions.
The team has been hampered
by the cold the last two days and
has been unable to practice out
of doors.
Stiff Test
Notre Dame could prove a stiff
test for the Wolverines. The Irish
have four letterman pitchers and
their complete infield return-
ing. Senior third baseman, Don
Sniegowski smacked out a .371
batting average last year and right
fielder, Jim Cusack batted .342.
Coach Fisher was a little wor-
ried about the team's lack of ac-
tivity. "It really hurts to be
rained out," he commented.;"Our
pitchers need plenty of work. We
Game Canceled
Yesterday's baseball game
scheduled for Ferry Field be-
tween Michigan and Western
Michigan was canceled because
of snow.
didn't hit too well the last two
games, but defensively we should
be at least even with the rest."
Fisher will probably start right-
hander Bill Thurston on the
mound today and finish up with
Don Poloskey. Both men are
tagged as starting pitchers this
season.

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I-M SOFTBALL:
Five .phi Delts Romp

IU

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in a wild game in wl
of nine men were stra
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Chicago (A) 2, Cle
In one of the tight
day games, the Chicag
edged Cleveland 2-1 w
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Gone are the days when young Joseph College settled for a
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his shirt collection with oxfords in many soft charcoal-suitmate
colors and a variety of neat new collar, styles. Like the Van
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an eye for correct but lively 1956 style! Only $5.00 each.

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hich a total Phi Delta Theta, playing with
nded on the only five men, defeated Delta Chi
9-3 in Intramural softball yester-
eveland 1 day at South Ferry Field.
test opening Pitcher .Bill MacFarland, with
o White Sox two infielders and one outfielder
hen the In- behind him, gave up three scat-
alked across tered hits and struck out eight in
one of the strangest I-M games
ever played.
The Phi Delt's were never head-
ed as Phil Mitchell walked in the
first inning and then proceeded
to steal second third and home.
With the score 1-0 in the top of the
third MacFarland tripled and
scored on Tom Jorgenson's infield
single. Four more runs crossed
the plate during'that inning end-
ing all hopes of Delta Chi.
Lambda Chi Alpha, runner-up
last. year, romped to a 13-2 victory
over Phi Kappa Tau. Dick Heusel,
elected to last year's all I-M soft-
ball team struck out six men and
. a gave up only two hits in a game
which went three innings due to
the time curfew.
e thinks One-Hitter Pitched
Cal Haywood of Delta Tau Delta
him to came as close as possible to a no-
n Apples hitter in the Delts 9-0 triumph
SApples over Zeta Psi. A bunt single in the
ception- bottom of the sixth and last inning
in which the runner was called
special- safe on a very close play spoiled
Haywood's chance for a perfect
game.
Dave Cobb of Delta Upsilon shut
out Tau Delta Phi 5-0. Cobb per-
mitted two hits while striking out
eight and was considerably helped
by the time limit.
Four runs were taken away from
Tau Delt when DU failed to bat in
- HOT-L the bottom half of the fifth inning.
'4 Stew Evans accounted for two runs
by hitting a home run with one
man on base.

Sigma Alpha Epsilon, defending
champions outclassed Tau Kappa
Epsilon 12-5 as Ron Poland pitch-
ed a two-hitter.
In the highest scoring game of
the day Chi Psi crushed Delta
Kappa Epsilon by scoring 16 runs
in the first inning. They went on
to win 19-15 led by the three run
homer of Corky Smith.
Psi Upsilon also had a field day
at the plate trouncing Alpha Epsi-
lon Pi 17-3. Hurler Phil Fast not
only held AEPi to two hits but also
homered with one man on base.
James Gilmore did likewise for the
victorious Psi U's.
In other contests Zeta Beta Tau
edged Theta Delta Chi 7-6; Tri-
angle downed Phi Kappa Psi, 11-7,
Beta Theta Pi shut out Trigon 7-0
behind the four-hit pitching of
Gordon Barnes, Theta C~i beat
Sigma Phi 12-3, and Alpha Delta
Phi blanked Acacia 7-0.

Formerly Infamous Activity,
Golf Becomes Modern Sport

STOlRE

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DA I L Y

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By NELS SHERBURNE
Golf, although considered today
to be a perfectly legal recreational'
activity, has not always enjoyed'
such a high position of social ac-j
ceptance.
Its early history is marked with
years of strife and friction with
the Scottish government. Many
famous people had a direct effect
on its development into a game en-
joyed throughout the world.
Banned By Lawj
Credit for golf's development in
the 14th century is attributed to
the "land of the heather." The
early knowledge of the game which

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we have today is traceable to the
edicts against its play.
In 1457, Parliament passed a
proclamation prohibiting play dur-
ing the ,month of March. It was
felt that golf was using valuable
time which should be spent prac-
ticing archery.
Competition continued among
the plebians, and the government
soon found it necessary to punish
land owners and players with life
imprisonments and heavy fine.
Noble Likes Game
James IV, a famous Scottish
nobleman,favored the law but
was induced into playing one day
and soon became an avid visitor to
the links. The working class upon
learning of his participation began
to take up the game earnestly.
The laws were not enforced dur-
ing the latter years of his rule.
It was during Queen Mary's
reign that golf reached new
heights of popularity, among the
people of the world. Her tours
led to the diffusion of the game to
the cultures of Europe.
Caddy Adopted
It was in France that the term
"caddy" was adopted, referring to.
those who chased the golf balls.
Scotland gave birth to the most
famous golf courses in the world.
Such courses as St. Andrew's and
Prestwick are unparalleled for
their scenic beauty and difficulty
of play.
The golfers who shoot on these
magnificent courses seldom give
thought to the struggle of their
ancestorstfor the establishment of
the sport.

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