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February 14, 1956 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-14

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1.4, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA

QLLIfYi dIh...
.r WITH PHIL DOUGLIS
Daily Sports Editor
FIGHTING is never condoned in any sport except boxing.
We certainly do not feel proud to see such behavior take place
in an athletic arena. But in ice hockey-the situation is different-
and what happened here in Ann Arbor the night of January 21st,
1956, will never be forgotten.
The 3,500 shouting fans-packed into the Hill Street Coliseum
like sardines at rush hour, will long mark the night as one of the
greatest emotional upheavals they have ever witnessed.
For this writer-it was one of the most memorable moments he
has ever seen. We viewed it with mixed feelings. We hate to see
poor sportsmanship take the place of hard, clean, play.
We never condone the out and out slugging of a rival on the
field of play. Yet, we saw it done dozens of times within four short
minutes, three weekends ago-and we can't say it wasn't completely
uncalled for.
Put yourself in the University of Michigan's hockey team's skates
for. a moment. You are nearing 'the end of two long evenings of
violent body contact. You have skated your way to two well deserved
victories-and yet every nerve in your body is worn-you ache from
the vicious checks you have received.
Sure-you have dished out your share of punishment too-but
that is hockey. Suddenly-with just 16 seconds left to play, you see
a teammate brutally smashed into the boards-and an elbow driven
into his face. He slumps to the ice-and lies still.
Your pent up emotions break loose. You lose your sense of
time and place--and follow sheer instinct, the instinct of the savage
game of ice hockey which you have played since childhood.
This was exactly what happened-as the greatest pitched battle
that Michigan's Coliseum has perhaps ever seen broke loose in all
its gruesome violence.
An instant later-one Michigan player accosted the burly Spartan
who sent Morley Chin into the boards. Fists flew. Within seconds,
gloves flew off all- over ice. This too is hockey. If this was in any
other sport-it would be a "shocking disgrace," akin to the hubbub
raised over the gridiron duel in this city on November 19th, 1955.
'Call to Duty'...
BUT THIS WAS HOCKEY. Players from both benches answered
the call to duty. Michigan was fighting ostensibly because a
teammate was hurt. The Spartans, burning in defeat, were bursting
at the seams with ire also.
A moment later-sthe two officials apparently had separated the
combatants-when two more men broke into fisticuffs in another
section of the swirling green and blue mass. The fight was reaching
full bloom. The huge crowd roared with mixed delight and astonish-
ment.
A hockey crowd-whether it be in Montreal, Calgary, or Ann
Arbor loves violence. Perhaps it is the fans' own inner aggressions
coming to the surface. They identify with the- combatants. It is
"bad"-yet really not so "bad"-it is part of the game to many.
The crowd-which only an hour before had showered the ice
with pennies and debris in a wild, angry demonstration against the
officials, now was in a far better mood as it lustily bellowed approval
as each blow landed on a green-shirted Spartan.
Typical of the reaction, was the remark of a young mother to
her golden-haired toddler. The tiny girl looked up quizzically as
begrizzled Bob Schiller sent some poor Lansingite into a semi-daze
-no less than five feet away. "Why are the men hitting each other
mommy?"k
The excited mother, in no mood to give an explanation, replied,
"Shut up-and enjoy it." If the young girl had asked us that question,
we probably would have quoted the famed statement of Dean of
Women Deborah Bacon-who once said "Boys will beboys," upon
another rowdy occasion.
Down went the players into heaps of furious action. Now the
coaches were out onto the ice. Vic Heyliger and Amo Bassone were
like mothers trying to separate their snarling children-only these
contestants were hard to separate. The pummeling increased-the
roar of the crowd reverberated across the haze-filled arena.
We looked out over the ice-one section was filled with gloves
and sticks-like an empty battle field. Another section was a writhing
mass of humanity-fury in all its manifestations.
Over by the boards-Morley Chin-the innocent cause of it all,
still lay motionless, while the team doctors and trainers bent over
him.
Suddenly a wave of children leaped onto the ice-dashing to-
wards the hockey sticks and gloves-seeking souvenirs. A squad of
rink attendants-many of them children themselves-dashed out to
hold them in check.
Along the sides-thousands of enraptured spectators watched the
panorama. To the uninitiated it was perhaps the most amazing thing
they ever witnessed. To the veteran hockey fan it was grounds for
comparison to that "brawl back in '47"-or the big one at Montreal-
or the gory night at New York-or a hundred other arenas ... any-
where.

Illinois Deals 'M' Cagers
Sixth Conference Defeat;

ENGINEERS

* MECHANICAL
* CIVIL

0 CHEMICAL
* ELECTRICAL

i
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i
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(continued from page 1)
Kramer topped the list of scor-
ers for both squads on his 10
field goals and six ffee tosses
while Ridley and BonSalle each
had 25 points.
Ridley played a terrific game in
quarterbacking the Illini offense
and lending the scoring punch to
keep the attack moving although
Jimmy Shearon kept fairly close
tabs on him until fouling out with
about seven minutes to go.
Pete Tillotson and Captain Tom
Jorgensen backed up Kramer's ef-
forts with 12 and 10 points respec-
tively.
Unerring accuracy from the foul
line kept the Illini going until they
began to hit more consistently
from the floor. The winners net-
ted 16 of 17 attempts in the first
half and finished with an overall
mark of over 76%. Michigan hit

on only 33% of its field goal
efforts while the Illini dropped
through 40%.
The defeat shoved Michigan
deeper into the Conference second
division with a record of three
wins against six losses while Illi-
nois maintained its single game
lead in the two team race for Big
Ten honors. The Wolverines now
rest in an eighth place deadlock

with Wisconsin and ahead only of
winless Northwestern.
In other Conference action Iowa
stayed a game behind Illinois by
downing Purdue, 88-75, as Minne-
sota upset Michigan State, 77-73.
Ohio State snapped back with an
83-72 win over Northwestern as
Robin Freeman notched 28. Wis-
consin trimmed Indiana, 69-67, to
complete the full slate of action.

STANDARD

Inhospitable Illini

RON KRAMER
. ..not enough

Gophers, NU
Fall Before
Gym-Squad
The Michigan gymnasts, led by
the outstanding performance of
point-grabbing all-around man Ed
Gagnier, are still going strong.
Coach Newt Loken's crew of
heavily-muscled athletes was twice
victorious during the semester
break whipping Minnesota and
Northwestern to remain undefeat-
ed in five Conference starts.
To add to the impressiveness the
string of beaten opponents has in-
cluded Illinois and Michigan State,
the two teams which finished one-
two in the Big Ten Meet last year.
Illinois went on to become National
Collegiate Champions.
Hope To Go Undefeated
Their record thus far has in-
spired a lot of hope in the Wolver-
ines for an undefeated season-
their first if they win. Only Ohio
State and Wisconsin stand in the
way.
Minnesota was the fourth squad
to fall under the pressure of theI
Gagnier perfection of performance
combined with Michigan's good
balance. The score was 64-48. Gag-
nier took three firsts and a sec-
ond against the northern oppon-
ents. Teammake Nick Wiese had
two seconds and three thirds and
Jack Burchfield led a 1-2-3 assault
on the trampoline.
Northwestern Trounced
Northwestern was also the vic-
tim of the slim sophomore from
Canada, 79-31, as Gagnier came
up with four wins. Wiese won twice
and Burchfield came through
again on the trampoline to give
Michigan a clean sweap of the
first places.
"We are all working very hard
for the undefeated season," said
Loken, in a tone which showed
some concern. Loken is worried
about the coming meet with Ohio
State. "They are very strong in
several events and we lack an im-
portant man." He was refering to
Norm Neidermeier who is inelig-
ible while making up an incom-
plete credit.
Icers Hold
Second Slot
Preparing to take on the Detroit
Red Wings tomorrow, Michigan's
ice squad holds second place in
the WIHL by a single point.
Sunday's Daily erroneously re-
ported that Michigan Tech had
climbed into a tie with the Wol-
verines by defeating Minnesota.
Actually, the Gophers trounced
Tech, 9-2, Saturday, to leave
Michigan alone in second place,
one point behind Colorado College.
After the annual Red Wing clash
tomorrow at the Coliseum, Michi-
gan returns to WIHL competition
with a weekend series at Minnes-
ota.
LATE SCORES
Iowa S8, Purdue 75
Minnesota 77, MSU 73
,Wisconsin 69, Indiana 67
OSU 83, Northwestern 72
Kentucky 86, Miss. State 65
Xavier (O.) 99, Louisville 59
DISTINCTIVE
HAIRSTYLING
for Michigan Students!!

Try us for:
0 WORKMANSHIP
e Personnel
s Service
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

MICHIGAN
Tillotson, f..«..
Tarrier, f.......
Lingle, fI.......
Kramer, ca......
Wright, g ......
Jorgensen, g ,...
Shearon, g ...
Raisor, g.......
Totals....,...
Michigan .....
Illinois.........

G F P T
6 %-3 3 12
1 3-4 1 5
1 1-2 1 3
10 6-9 4 26
1 0-0 2 2
3 4-4 2 10
2 0-0 5 4
1 2-2 0 4
25 16-24 18 66
........32 34-66
........38 51-89

ILLINOIS
Ohl, f.........
Schmidt, f.....
Brothers, f...
Paul, f .........
Stout, f-c ...
Ridley, g.......
Paul Judson, g .
Altenberger, g ..
Phil Judson, g,.

G
1
4
0
0
3
9
9
5
0

F
2-2
2-2
1-3
0-0
4-5
7-10
'7-7
0-1
0-0
0-0

P
1
3.
0
0
1
2
4
1
e
z

T
4
10
1
0
10
25
25
10
0
4

Iferviews With Engineering Seniors Will Be Held
FEBRUARY 21, 1956
For Positions As Engineers In The
Manufacturing Department
STANDARD OIL COMPANY
( Indiana )
Contact Your Placement Office For An
Interview Appointment

Totals.........33

23-30 14 89

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GENE KRUPA
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HARRY JAMES
TEDDY WILSON

"

*

Sudden Calm...
CHIIpREN WERE ELATED-grown men bellowed "ata boy-hit 'im
again." The fight meanwhile grew worse-if that was possible.
And suddenly-within seconds-it ended as soon as it had started.
But wait-suddenly a Michigan player leaped into the stands-
over the players' bench-and tore into a foe who apparently had
thrown some new verbal abuse at him. The two players rained
slashing blows upon each other, and in the confusion, it is altogether
possible that a few fans got in some licks also.
The roar grew louder-and suddenly the officials had it all in
hand again. The brawl was over. An announcement was made call-
ing the game a completed one. It would have been foolish to play
out the final 13 seconds. Someone might have gotten hurt.
We devote a column to this melee not because it was an ex-
ceptional event. It happens in pro hockey almost weekly. Yet, in
collegiate hockey here at the University of Michigan, such large
scale imbroglios are not too prevalent-though smaller ones do erupt
from tine, to time.
We do not offer this piece as a condemnation. Nor do we offer
it as praise either. We retell the story of this pugilistic ending to a
weird semester of Michigan sports, basically to give the many hockey
fans that were not there a picture of what they missed-to report an
event which may have been neglected otherwise.
We certainly do not approve of such spectacles-but when they
do occur-they add a flavor to the game that makes hockey unusual
among sports.
Vic Heyliger once said "'taint hockey if you don't bump em -
They sure "bumped 'em" that Saturday night at the Coliseum.

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