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April 12, 1956 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-04-12

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THURSDAY, APRIL 12 1956

--' THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGN I

~IURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1956 -' THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA(~

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Maize, Blue Teams:
Prepare for Weekend
1~~ ~~~~ _________________________________________________

WAA Plans Lantern Night Sing

G I

Freshman womcen will take overv
the League Ballroom on Friday
and Saturday, April 27 and 28,
when they present their annual
Frosh Weekend.
During Orientation Week each
freshman coed draws for either the
Maize or Blue Team: Each team
presents a dance and provides
original entertainment in the form
of a floorshow.
This year the Blue Team will
give their dance and floorshow on
Friday, and the Maize Team will
present their production on Sat-
urday.. The dances are all-campus
coed-bid events.
To Vie for Plaque
The teams are judged on the
basis of publicity, floorshow, pro-
grams, 'ticket design, amount of
dues collected, the number of tick-
ets sold and the total budget, by a
committee of judges elected by a
joint Maize and Blue committee.
The winning team is awarded a
plaque. Each team has won three
times and in 1955 both teamh tied.
Profits from this year's Frosh

Weekend will be divided between
the Student Activities Building
Equipment Fund and the World
University Service.
Three-fold Purpose.
Begun as a freshman coed pro-
ject in 1948, Frosh Weekend has
a three-fold purpose. One goal is
to unite the women of the fresh-

manclass
which is
friendship

in a mutual project,
intended to promote
and cooperation. among

97'

Initiates

its members.
Secondly, the project is designed
to teach students early in their
college life the fundamentals of
committee work. The third aim is
to acquaint freshmen with the
League and its function.
Central Committee
At the beginning of the second
semester, members of the previous.
year's Frosh Weekend central com-
mittee meet to conduct petitioning
for the new central committee.
When the new central committee
is chosen, they begin planning and
making arrangements, most of
which are kept secret until the
nights of the performances.
The work of each team includes
the selecting of a floorshow cast,
the writing of original -entertain-
ment and the planning of a pub-
licity campaign.
Frosh Weekend had its origin in
the Freshman Spread, a project
popular in the 1920's. The first
actual record of a freshman pro-
duction was a program entitled
"The History of Music" given in
1924.
This pageant consisted of a'series
of dances performed by freshman
coeds at the traditional, Lantern
Night. This outdoor program pre-
sented just before sundown, con-
tinued for nine year until 1933.

Song leaders of all sororities,
dormitories and other houses plan-
ning to participate in Lantern
Night will meet today at 5:10 p.m.
in the Women's Athletic Buildirg.
In this annual event sponsored
by the Women's Athletic Associa-
tion, choral groups from various
women's residences on campus will
vie for first place in the Lantern
Night Sing program.
Preceding this program, an elim-
ination session is held, from which
ten houses are usually selected to
compete in Lantern Night.
Eliminations To Be Held
This year the eliminations will
be held Wednesday, May 9, with
the final event scheduled for Tues-
day, May 15. Both contests will
take place in Hill Auditorium.
During the eliminations, the only
persons allowed to attend are
the judges and others directly con-
nected with the planning of Lan-
tern. Night.
'The winning house in the song-
fest will receive a silver loving
cup, with its name engraved on it.
Second and third place winners
will also be chosen.
A posture cup is also awarded
to the group having the best pos-
ture while singing. Second and
third places are also announced
for this.
Houses to Sponsor Groups
Housing groups which take part
in the eliminations, but are not
selected to appear in Lantern
Night, are assigned to sponsor a
group which will sing in Lantern
Night,
In past years, sponsoring houses
have' provided competing houses
with moral support by singing and
cheering.

Before the Lantern Night pro-
gram, all women on campus tra-
ditionally march with the Michi-
gan Marching Band down State
Street from the Union to Hill
Auditorium in the Lantern Night
Parade.
Parade Honors Women
The parade is designed to es-
pecially honor the graduating sen-
ior women, and is one of the last
functions in which they will par-
ticipate as a class.
Members of each house will line
up together as a group, with house
representatives leading their own
unit and carrying banners to iden-
tify their respective residences.

In front of Hill Auditorium, the
coeds will form a large block-"M,"
while the band plays "The Victors"
and "Varsity."
Then, with everyone standing at
attention, the University alma
mater, "The Yellow and Blue,"
will be sung.
President Announces Winners
The retiring WAA president,
Jaylee Duke, will take the stage
along with the newly-chosen presi-
dent, Charlotte Haller, to an-
nounce the winners of the Lantern
Night awards after the contest.
In previous ,years, recordings of
the participants in the contest
have been available for those wish-
ing to purchase them.

Musical Theme To,

Prevail

At Alice Lloyd Spring Dance

A musical theme will prevail at
the annual Alice Lloyd spring for-
mal which will be held from 9 p.m.
until midnight tomorrow..
The theme 'Downbeat' will be
carried out in the main lounge and
in the four individual house loun-
ges of Alice Lloyd.
In the main lounge Hal Singer's
Band will provide music for the
occasion. This music will be piped
into two of the smaller lounges
which will also be used for dancing.
Refreshments will be served in
the other two rooms. One of these
small refreshment rooms will be
decorated as tthe Blue Note Cafe
with blue; white and black as pre-
dominate colors.

The central figure in one of the
dancing lounges will be the large
silhouette of a dance band. On the
other walls' of this room will be
posters used as publicity by various
recording companies.
Silhouettes of music lovers,
dancers and chorus lines, paper
mache .instruments and shadow
boxes will help create the atmos-
phere of Jazzland
Seventeen chairmen head the
various committees organized for
Downbeat.' Gwen Bashara and
Penny LaFlair are general chair-
men of the event assisted by busi-
ness chairman Doris Rosenberg.

Announced
By Honorary.
Alpha Lambda Delta, national'
freshman scholarship honorary,
announces its new members.
Coeds who have attained a 3.5
or higher average during their
first year are Judith Adams, Cyn-
thia Allen, Gayle Ashburn, Lynette
Beall and Marilyn Berry;
Xenia Bibicoff, 'Mary Ann Bie-
denharn, Belle Bisno, Joan Blau-
rock, Brenda Bloomberg, Elaine
Brodey, Jean Butterer, Carla Car-
gill, Sarah Colwell, Charlotte Costa,
Dorothy Cullers and Marianne
Davidson;
Pamela Dexter, Sarah Drasin,
Patricia Ehrhardt, Patricia Ellis,
Kathleen Emmons, Doris Esch,
Lynn Fieldman, Lenore Fink, Jan-
ice Forbes, Kathryn Frakes, Eliza-
beth Fries, Fern Frisby, Sandra
Gault, Beverly Grey, Toni Goldish,
Ellen Goldman, Helaine Govenar
and Diane Greenberg;
Judith Greenberg, Beverly Gross,
Joann Gugel, Barbara Halpern,
Beverly Harling, Gaily Harnden,
Susan Hattendorf, Elizabeth Hau-
ghn, Patience Hervig, Jane Hill,
Joann Hodgman, Anne Horaczek
and Elizabeth Jacobson;
Carol Jones, Sylvia Kaiserman,
Lillian Kamper, Katrina Kuzenga,
Leora Lawrence, Nancy Leach,
Linda Lee, Nancy- Leighton, Ann
Lovett, Mary Lovewell, Sandra.
Lovre, Carolyn Ludwig, Carol Luse,
Judy Meites, Patricia Millette,
Mary Morris and Aileen Mulligan;
Jane Nulty, Mary O'Neil, Pris-
cilla Oppenheim, Claire Padover,
Rosemary Palen, Gail Parr, Judith
Peery, Helen Powajba, Sue Ray,
Sandra Riehards, Barbara Roos,
Margaret Rowe, Alice Royer, Shu-
shanah Rutenberg, Judith Sanders,
Marilyn Sarver and Claire Schein;
Ellen Schreiber, Marcia Silber,
Lorraine Small, , Marjorie Smit,
Kay Smith, Shane Spanier, Sallie
Steketee, Sylvia Stempel, Susan
Stokes, Nancy Thomas, Anita Ver-
blen, Sarah Weiner, Jean Will-
oughby and Julie Windham.

INTRODUCING .
exciting new stainless
flatware pattern, MOTION.
5-piece place setting $8.50
Ask to see it at your
convenience.
JOHN LEIDY
537 East Liberty * NO 8-6779

'E

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17 Nickels Arcade

SOFTBALL. TOURNAMENT --
The following games will be played
at 5:10 p.m. today in the women's,
all campus softball touriament at
Palmer Field. Sigma Kappa vs.
Collegiate Sorosis and Martha
Cook vs. Newberry in League A;.
Alpha Chi Omega vs. Chi Omega
and Alpha Phi vs. Kappa Kappa
Gamma in League B.
BURO-CATS-There will be a
meeting of 'the Buro-Cat Secre-
tariat Committeeat 6:30 p.m.
today in the League. The room
will be posted.
BLUE TEAM - There will be
meetings of the following Frosh
Weekend Blue Team 'committees
today in the League; decorations
and a mass rehearsal will be at
7 p.m. and programs at 7:30 p.m.
* . *
LEAGUE COUNCIL-There will
be a League Council meeting at
7:30 p.m. today in the League.
MODERN DANCE - Members
of the Modern Dance Club will
meet at 7:30 p.m. today in Barbour
Gymnasium.
** . *
HILLEL -- The dramatics group
of the Hillel Foundation will pre-
sent a one act play at 7:30 p.m.
on Sunday entitled, "Pastor Knoll."
It will follow the weekly Sunday
Night Supper Club in the main
Chapel.

100%°oImptedJ Cash~mere
SPORT COATS
Hutzel's has an extraordinary group of specially purchased
short coats for the most discriminating taste . . . coats of
precision tailoring, beautiful styling in the most luxurious
fabric . . . 100% Imported Cashmere Hopsacking at an
almost unheard of low price«. . Soft shades in Misses' sizes.
39.95
All Sales Final

SWIMSUITS
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flews with a dazzling daisy duo.
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shape to be in! Elsticind.
bengalinei 19.95
MADEMOISELLE
301Soth State Street

--

Subscrlbe to The Michigan Daily

J 111 J 1 11 1
11 11 :1 S ,

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HAPPY, CAREFREE AND FLIPPANT

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DRESSES and HATS

4

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from 5.95

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100% WOOL
Boxy and fitted type at $38.00
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GROUP OF RAIN
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Corduroys, wool tweeds, $14.95.
Orig. were to 29.95.

DRESSES
one, two-piece, also dresses with
jackets, rayon crepes, silks,
some prints. Orig. 29.95 to
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of all kinds for day and evening
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BETTER HATS
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Better rings, Rhinestone neck-
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Many other unadvertised

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