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April 10, 1956 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-04-10

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Sixty-Sixth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICH. * Phone NO 2-3241

'Tsk Tsk - Somebody Should Do Something About That"

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

4p

Minions Are Free,
Will Prevail"

3ditorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers or
the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.

ESDAY, APRIL 10, 1956

NIGHT EDITOR: DICK SNYDER

Would Postage Increase Provide
Luxuries Or Necessities?

(Continued from Page 2)
and Metal. for Research, Devel., Design,
Prod., and Constr. 4
Detroit Edison Co., Detroit, Mich. -
Soph. and Jr. in Mech., Elect., Arch.,
Ch.E., and Metal for Summer Employ-
ment in Research, Devel., Plant and
System Design, Equipment Engrg., Pur-
chasing and Sales.
Reynolds Metals Co., Richmond, Va.-
all levels in Ch.E., Ind., Mech., Metal.,
Arch. and Science for Research, Prod.,
Fabricating, and Sales.
Thurs., Fri., April 12, 13:
The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati,
Ohio-Che.E., Mech., Ind., Civil, Elect.,
Engrg. Mech., Chemistry, Ind. Mgt., and
Ind. Rel. for Summer Positions.
Fri., April 13:
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron,
Ohio-Civil, Che.E., Mech., Elect., and
Ind. for Summer Training Program.
Mon., April 16:
Automatic Elect. Co., Chicago. Ill.
B.S. in Elect., Ind. and Mech. for Re-
search, Devel., Design, Prod., and Sales
Engrg. U.S. citizen.
Pittsburgh Coke and Chem. Co., Pitts.,
Pa.-all levels in Che.E. for Summer and
Regular Research, Devel., Design, and
Prod. U.S. citizens.

U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, Kan-
sas City, Mo.-all levels in Civil, and
Elect. for Deck Officer. U.S. citizens.
The Institute of Paper Chem., Apple-
ton, Wis.-Post Grad. Preparation and
Regular Research, Devel.,"Design, Prod.,
and Admin. for all, levels in Che.E.,
Mech., Eng. Mech., Physics, and Science.
U.S. citizen.
For appointments contact the Engrg.
Placement Office, Ext. 2182, 347 W.E.
EXAMINATION REMINDER:
U.S. Civil Service announces another
Federal Service Entrance Exam for
positions throughout the U.S., in vari-
ous fields on the entrance or junior
level. People in Statistics, Econ., Library
Science, Biol., Transportation and Traf-
fic are especially needed in the Wash-
ington area. In Ill., Mich. and Wis.
there is a particular need for Budget
Assist., Pers. Mgt. Trainees, Organization
and Methods Examiner, Claims Exam-
iner, Econ.,Statisticians, Tax Collector.
and Investigator. Both men and women
are eligible to apply. Applications must
be in or postmarked not later than April
19 for the test given May 5.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 371.

:I

TUDENTS who have recently stopped at the
post office may have seen the government's
west folly in action-the talking postage
imp machine.
Our post office department is not contented
th the conventional machines that merely
pense strips of one-, two-, three- or six-cent
imps. The department is not satisfied with
achines that accept envelopes one at a time
d stamp them automatically. Nor is the
st office happy with the installation of new
achines at stamp windows that dispense
amps in the same manner as tickets at a
>vie theater box office.
No, the United States Post' Office must be
gger and better and. more automatic than
has been with these inventions. Now that
e, movement for painting. mail boxes and
ail trucks red, white and blue instead of the
3 olive drab is well under way, the efforts of
e department can be centered on talking
imp machines.
The machines sell two-, three- and six-cent
amps in any combination up to the value of
e amount of money inserted in the coin slot.
ien, when the customer presses the "change
turn" button, a voice booms out, "THANK
)U. This has been another service of your
endly post office department." Or the
ice might say, "THANK YOU. Now buy,
me more and save yourself another trip."
ie mechanical voice has a large repertire for
occasions.
NE OF THE REACTIONS to these innova-
tions is "Why don't they improve delivery
rvice instead?" Certainly nothing varies more

across the country than delivery service. Some
cities have nothing to complain about, while
people in other areas continually lament the
sad state of mail deliveries and plead for twice-
a-day service. Mail delivery in Ann Arbor may
not be the best in the country, but there is
little to complain about justly.
However, regardless of whether or not the
new talking stamp machines are detracting
from possible improvement of mail deliveries,
there is still a problem of expense to the tax-
payers.
Right now, in a Congressional committee, lies
a bill to boost postage rates from.three to four
cents for ordinary domestic letters. The three-
cent letter is beyond a doubt one of the great-
est values today, one that has been enjoyed for
about 25 years. A four-cent letter, many
people realize, would still be a bargain.
BUT WHAT would that extra penny be used
for? Would it go to improving delivery
service and raising postal employees pay, or
would it be used to finance talking postage
stamp machines in post offices across the na-
tion?
Do the American people want these mach-
ines that say "Thank you" badly enough to
stick more expensive postage stamps on their
mail?
A raise in postage rates is something that
Congress will soon be considering. They will
also have to consider if the people will stand
for such a raise if it will just be used to in-
crease the number of talking stamp machines.
-VERNON NAHRGANG

#I

Second Semester
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
June 1 to June 12, 1956
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "Time
of Class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "Time of Class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates having a scheduled examination on June
11 or 12 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
examination. The instructor may arrange with the student for
an alternate time, with notice to the scheduling committee.
Evening Schedule for Degree Candidates

AI

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND:
Do-Little CongressPredicted"~
By DREW PEARSON

I

Muffing Our Chance

A REPORT last week from the International
Rescue Committee indicates something is
vrong with the West's refugee program.
Refugees from East Europe are re-defecting
ack to their Communist homelands in alarm-
rng numbers. According to the emergency coi-
nission of the IRC, 1,158 returned during 1955
nd January of 1956. At this rate, for every
Ive persons who fled to Westerpm Europe during
his period, there was one who returned to
he Communists.
The handling of the 'refugee program has
een one of the West's big sore spots for a
ong time. The emergency commission listed
'disillusion, despair and failure of human cour-
ige" as some of the reasons why tlie fugitives
lecided to go back into the hands of the Reds
gain.
Stories are told of inadequate quarters, food,
lothing and most of all, of inadequate means
f integrating the refugees into Western so-
ieties. But somehow the stories do not re-
elve much notice.
THE TREMENDOUS FLOOD of individuals
from one society to another has little prece-

dent in history. It is one of the striking indi-
cations of the Free World's fundamental sup-
eriority to the Communists. There could hard-
ly be a more sincere endorsement a people could
pay than to flee from their homes at the risk
of their lives to come to the Western World.
.But instead of welcoming these people, of-
ficials herd them into makeshift refugee camps
and forget about them. The camps are piti-
fully short of funds, supplies and adequate
personnel.
At the start of the cold war the sudden ap-
pearance of the Communist refugees took the
Free World by surprise. Improvised camps
were thrown up to house them. The huge in-
flux has continued, but practically nothing more
was done. in all the years since then.
And now the Free World suddenly discovers
the migration is beginning to reverse.
Through the refugees the West has a chance
to demonstrate everywhere the preference these
people have for Western democracy.
It's too bad that the West is muffing that
chance.;
-TED FRIEDMAN

HARRY TRUMAN, asked by
newsmen in New York whether
the 84th Congress would be a do-
nothing Congress, said: "You can't
tell until the Congress is over."
Congressman Ken Keating (R-
N.Y.) doesn't agree. He claims the
84th Congress is getting nowhere
fast.
As Congress returned from the
Easter recess-a relatively new va-
cation idea, incidentally-it ap-
pears to outside observers that
Congressman Keating and the Re-
publicans are right. This Congress
is on the way to doing not much of
anything.
* * *
THERE ARE several reasons, as
follows:
1. Lyndon Johnson, who did a
great job last year, is now handi-
capped by a heart condition which
requires him to go back to Texas
to rest every two or three weeks.
He has taken four vacations since
Jan. ..1. Eisenhower has taken
three. You can't lead the Senate--
or the country-with a part-time
leader.
2. When Johnson works for the
nation as a whole he is superb. But
when he works for the Texas ty-
coons and his own campaign con-
tributors he is a tragic failure. This
year he has put the latter ahead
of the nation.
3. Speaker Sam Rayburn, one
of the.truly great legislators of our
time, is getting old, has been wor-
ried about the long illness of his
beloved sister, and has been absent
from Washington. Sam has also
been trying to keep peace in a
Democratic. family which has
Adam Clayton Powell, the Negro
Congressman from Harlem on one
side,.and race-conscious Georgians
and Mississippians on the other
side.
* * *'
SO WHEN it comes to passing
important legislation, here is the
result:
School Construction-Stymied in
the Rules Committee, thanks to
Congressman Howard Smith of
Virginia. Rayburn, however, can

round up enough votes to get it out
of committee and to a vote in the
House. So far Sam has stalled, not
wanting to inflame tempers and
tear the Democratic Party apart
with a debate over segregation.
Civil Rights-A bill to protect
the voting rights of Negroes had
made some progress in the House
Judiciary Committee and will prob-
ably reach the House floor for a
vote. A similar but broader bill is
being pushed by Hennings of Mis-
souri in the Senate. However, there
is little chance that either will be
passed.
SOCIAL SECURITY - Senator
Byrd of Virginia and the Eisen-
hower Administration are allied in
trying to block refo ms to give
pensions to disabled1 workmers of
fifty years, reduce the pension age
for women from 65 to 62, and ex-
tend pension benefits to more
white collar and professional work-
ers. Despite Byrd opposition, how-
ever, this bill will pass.
Highway Construction - The
Democrats fell for the blarney of
the big trucking lobby at first and
put the cost of highway building as
much or proportionately on the
small motorist as on the big truck-
er. Republicans took advantage of
Democratic stupidity-or obeisance

to the lobby-and changed this.
Legislators are now wrangling over
another lobby-sponsored provision
-to reimburse telephone compan-
ies and the utilities for moving
their poles when highways are
broadened.
Minimum Wage Revision -- The
new $1 minimum wage went into
effect March 1. An attempt to raise
this to $1.25 so soon won't get to
first base this session.
* * *
PUBLIC HOUSING - Senator
Lehman (D-N.Y.) is pushing a bill
to provide 600,000 low-rent, public
housing units in three years, plus
an ambitious program of low-cost
loans for the middle-income brack-
ets. Senator Capehart of Indiana
has introduced the Administra-
tion's housing bill, which provides
only 35,000 public housing units
next year.
Income Tax Cuts-No hearings
have been held, except on measures
to extend corporation and excise
taxes that otherwise would drop
automatically. There has been a
lot of talk in Democratio policy
huddles about a drive for tax cuts
for the low-income brackets. This
talk hasn't yet been translated into
action.
(Copyright 1956, by Bell Syndicate, Inc.)

I

Regular Mon.
Exam June 11
Time 9-12 A.M.
Mon.
Special June 4
Period 710 P.M.
Each student should

Mon. Tues.
June 11 June 12
2-5 P.M. 9-12 A.M.
Tues. Wed.
June 5 June 6
7-10 P.M. 4-10 P.M.
receive notification from

Toes.
June 12
2-5 P.M
Thfrs.
June 7
7-10 P.M.
his instruc-

E

tor as to the time and place of his examination.

Time of Class

MONDAY
TUESDAY

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

REGULAR SCHEDULE
Time of Examination
8 Friday, June 1
9 Monday, June 4
10 Tuesday, June 5
11 Saturday, June 2
12 Friday, June 8
1 Friday, June 8
2 Wednesday, June 6
3 Friday, June 8

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12

li i

8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Saturday, June 2
Tuesday, June 5
Friday, June 1
Monday, June 4
Thursday, June 7
Thursday, June 7,
Wednesday, June 6

4I

'+

TODAY AND TOMORROW:
Leadership and Straddle,
By WALTER LIPPMANN

A GREAT DEAL is being said abroad and
here at home about how necessary and
urgent it is that this country give firm and
clear leadership to the non-communist world.
It is easier to say that than to aio it. But I
wonder .whether the President and Secretary
Dulles have not in fact come to think of the
world situation in terms other than that of
leadership, whether, indeed, they are trying
to lead.
In the past few months Mr. Dulles has
found himself entangled in an extraordinary
series of dilemmas-in issues in which he is
damned if he does and damned if he doesn't.
He has been caught in the Goa dilemma be-
tween Portugal and India, in the Jakarta dilem-
ma between the Netherlands and Indonesia, in
the North African dilemma between France
and the Algerian Arabs, in the Palestine dilem-
ma between Israel and the Arabs, in the Bagh-
dad dilemma between Iraq and Egypt, in the
Editorial Staff
DAVE BAAD, Managing Editor
MURRY FRYMER JIM DYGERT
Editorial Director City Editor
DEBRA DURCHSLAG................Magazine Editor
DAVID. KAPLAN . .... ,............... Feature Editor
JANE HOWARD ...................... Associate Editor
LOUISE TYOR ....................... Associate Editor
PHIL DOUGLIS........................ Sports Editor
ALAN4 EISENBERG, .... ....Associate Sports Editor
JACK HORWIT2............. Associate Sports Editor
MARY HELLTHALER .........Women's Editor
ELAINE EDMONDS....,... Associate Women's Editor
JOHN HIRTZEL .................. Chief Photographer
Business Staff
DICK ALSTROM.................... Business Manager

Cyprus dilemma between Britain and Greece,
in the Persian Gulf dilemma between Saudi-
Arabia and Great Britain, and so on and on.
This is all rather different from what it used
to be in the pre-Geneva phase of the cold war.
Then the issues were between Communists and
anti-Communists. The line of leadership was
self-evident. But now the issues which plague.
Mr. Dulles are very often primarily among our
allies and the peoples that we are courting.
Mr. Dulles is in theory a believer, as he said
in his famous Life magazine interview, in tak-
ing a clear position so that foreign govern-
ments will not miscalculate. In actual prac-
tice, beginning with Quemoy and Matsu and
going on to Palestine, he has devoted an im-
mense amount of his energy trying not to
make clear choices in the dilemmas which
confront him. I am not attempting here to
criticize or to judge but only to describe when
I say that a large part of our current policy
is to work out ways of straddling the manys
horrid choices with which we are confronted.
T HE OLD much simpler days are past when
there was one great adversary and leader-
ship consisted in opposing him. The great
adversary is still there, to be sure, but he is
playing a secondary part in the troubles of
France in North Africa and of Great Britain
in the Middle East.
The President and Mr. Dulles give the im-
pression of being men who are not so much
trying to lead a grand alliance as they are
to disentangle themselves from its quarrel and
to become if possible mediators. This is their
line in Cyprus, in Palestine, and in effect in
North Africa. They are trying not to become

To The Editor

Content, Not Method*...
To the Editor:
THE proposed teachers' code has
carried one idea to ridiculous
proportions, the philosophy of in-
terchangeable parts. What the
code in reality does is to make
each teacher in the State of Mich-
igan a cog in the secondary school
system. By removing so much
content from the teachers' learn-
ing experience and replacing it

xith method, the State Educational
Board will successfully train func-
tionaries-not teachers.
The extreme emphasis on meth-,
od is a gross impersonalization of
teaching. Just because a teacher
can pick up a text on history and
teach the text does not make him
an historian and so, on down the
line. It takes knowledge of the
subject to teach critical methods
of analysis. It is extremely im-
portant at the high school level
that there should be greater em-
phasis on content rather than on
method for one very significant
reason. The great majority of stu-
dents will not have the benefit of
a college education. Their training
and introduction to intellectual
standards must come before they
leave high school. In order to
make them conscientious citizens,
they must have some contact with
material.
Individual specialization in the
training of the teachers is being
changed for "broad areas of con-
centration" which is another note
for concentrated areas of ignor-
ance. To become familiar with a
subject only on a sophomore level,
is no knowledge at all. Survey
courses are fine in that they give
the student some idea as to how
broad and vast different fields are.
However, they give a student con-
versant and spurious phrases in-
stead of genuine knowledge. A
good teacher must have more than
this. A teacher, to be skilled, must

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
Botany 2, 122 Thursday, June 7 9-12
Bus. Ad. 11 Friday, June 8 2-5
Bus. Ad. 12 Wednesday, June 6 2-5
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 8, 20, 182, 183 'Wednesday, June 6 9-12
Economics 71 Friday, June 8 2-5
Economics 72 Wednesday, June 6 2-5
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 102,153 Thursday, June 7 2-5
English 1, 2 Group A Wednesday, June 6 2-5
English ,1, 2 Group B* Friday, June 8 2-5
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 22, 31, 32, 61, 62 Tuesday, June 12 9-12
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32 Tuesday, June 12 2-5
Naval Science 102, 202, 302, 402 Saturday, June 9 2-5
Political Science 2 Monday, June 11 9-12
Psychology 31 Saturday, June 9 9-12
Psychology 271 Wednesday, June 6 9-12
Russian 2 Monday, June 11 2-5
Sociology 1 Group A, 60 Saturday, June 9 9-12
Sociology 1 Group B Monday, June 11 9-12
Spanish 1, 2, 22, 31, 32 Monday, June 11 2-5
*This Group B exam. is open only to students having a
*conflict with the period assigned to Group A.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Ch.-Met. 1 Monday, June 11 2-5
C.E. 2 Saturday, June 9 9-12
C.E. 70 , Monday, June 11 9-12
C.E. 181 Monday, June 11 2-5
Draw. 1,3 Tuesday, June 12 215
Draw. 2 Monday, June 11 9-12
Draw, 2x Saturday, June 9 9-12
E.E. 5 Saturday, June 9 9-12
E.M. 1 Tuesday, June 12 9-12
E.M. 2 Monday, June 11 9-12
English 10, 11 Monday, June 11 9-12
M.-I. 135 Wednesday, June 6 9-12
M.-I. 136 Tuesday, June 12 2-5
Nav& Science 102, 202, 302, 402 Saturday, June 9 2-5
Physics 53 Friday, June 1 2-5
P.E. 31, 32, 131 Saturday, June 9 9-12
SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 W.E. between
April 20 and May 4 for instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music

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