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March 27, 1956 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

N.

THE MICIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 27, 1956

_.

ORTH CAMPUS BUILDING:
Instrument Shop Extends Work Area
A new instrument shop is now ..
operation on North Campus.
The shop, formerly known as
le University Instrument .Shop,
oved into the basement of the
utomotive Laboratory Building '
cently from its old location at
20 East Engineering.
The shop's function will be to
instruct and check out various
rpes of instruments for the Engi-
sering Research Institute and any
,her division of the University
hich might need such services,
icording to Director Ora G. Blo-

Blocher, former research engi-
neer at the Willow Run Labora-
tories, replaced Prof. Orlan W.
Boston, chairman of the produc-
tion engineering department, as
director:
He said that "the shop will no
longer contract for outside jobs,
which it did while under produc-
tion engineering department con-
trol, but. will act strictly as :a
service unit of the Universtiy."
Shop manager Edward Rupke,
formerly connected with the Wil-
low Run Research Center, assert-
ed, "private contracts which inter-
fered with the shop's work in the
past made this change necessary.''
Foreman Frank Chadsey is in
charge of the plant's 17 employees,
but otherwise organization in the
shop is still; inrthe transitional
stage, Rupke said.
The shop' measures approxi-
mately 5,000 square feet. Full
length windows line the exposed
south side of the wall. Equipment
includes 10 lathes, six milling ma-'
chines, four grinders, drill presses,
inspection, stockroom, and welding
equipment and miscellaneous tools
moved from the old shop.
"The space and the lighting are
improvements over those of the
old shop," Chadsey said.
The old shop's space will be
given to ERI for use in research
work.
Faculty Plans
Quad Symposiumm
Four members of the Universi-
ty's political science department
will participate in a symposium,
"Democracy vs. Communist," at 7
p.m. today in West Quadrangle.
Prof. Lionel Laing, Prof. Henry
Bretton and Prof. Frank Grace,
assisted by William Ritchie, will
take part in the first Inter-House
Council-sponsored Faculty Debate.
Today's presentation is aimned
at highlighting the differences be-
tween the two forms of govern-
ment and the two ways of think-
ing, and is drawn from a compara-
tive European governments course.
IHC officers emphasize that the

Agricultural
Life Noted
In ,old Cities
Materials from Iraq which re-
veal the environment and exact
dates of the two oldest known vil-
lages in which man led an agri-
cultural life were revealed here re-
cently.
Robert J. Braidwood, University
of Chicago professor of anthro-
pology, delivered the general lec-
ture before the annual meeting of
the Michigan Academy of Science,
Arts an'd Letters.
Prof. Braidwood has played a
prominent role in the discovery
and examination of two ancient
villages in Iraq. Six years ago he
found Jarmo, where prehistoric
man established a farming vil-
lage about 4700 B.C. In Decem-
ber, 1954 he led a study group
from the University of Chicago's
Oriental Institute which found and
reported the even earlier village
of M'leffat, which probably ante-
dates 5000 B.C.
Describes Findings
In his speech to the Academy,
he described findings of these dis-
coveries. He traced the transition
from cave to village life and touch-
ed on the life of the present in-
habitants of the area.
Horn cores, the bonystructure
remaining after the skin is drawn
off the horns of goats, gave his ex-
pedition to M'leffat one clue to
the existence of domesticated ani-
mals 7,000 years ago he said. The
horns of wild goats were straight
and sabre-shaped, he noted, while
those of domesticated goats were
curved or twisted.
General evidence, Prof. Braid-
wood reported, indicates that the
climate and environment were not
greatly different in 4500-5000 B.C.
than now.

4

SUNDIAL -WITH
5 O'CLOCK SHADOW
Charles Segal
Clemson

*1
A

EMPLOYEES IN THE NORTH CAMPUS INSTRUMENT SHOP
Liver Spreads, Smoked Hams
May Be Sold In Metal Tubes

OSTRICH IN DANGER
Samuel Salkin
U. of California

It may not be too long before
American housewives are adding
tubes of gravy and smoked ham
to their shopping lists.
According to a recent magazine
report, foods sold in collapsible
metal tubes - already generally
accepted in Europe-are arousing
a great deal of interest in this
country.
Liver spreads, herring, anchovy,
mustards, cheeses, evaporated
milk, jellies and condiments are
among the products which a Euro-
pean can buy in a container re-
sembling a toothpaste tube.
Among the features which ap-
peal to Europeans, are the small
size of the tubes and the protec-
tion which they offer against oxi-
dation.
For successful packaging, tube
foods must be specially prepared
following laboratory investigation.
than for canned foods.
Union Membership
Union life memberships are now
available in the business office of
the Union.
Any male student who has paid,
full tuition for eight, semesters
may pick up his free life member-
ship.

-A continuous and consistant flow
must be insured as lumps would
close the opening. There must be
no separation in storage and no
settling or hardening of the pro-
duct in the tube.
Adequate tube-filling machines
are currently available in this
country and according to the arti-
cle, sterilization of tubed foods is
in some respects less complicated

NOON RUSH
IN PIGPEN
Eileen Peterson
South Dakota State

CHEMICAL ENGINEERS
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
Monsato Chemical Company
WILL INTERVIgNW ON CAMPUS
HARRY 0. HEHNER, REPRESENTATIVE
Thursday and Friday,
March 29 and 30

-- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

LUCKIES TASTE BETTER - /eaner, Fresher Smoother!
4)A7 R OD UCT OF (Mi 9Lt Rf AMERICA'S LEADING MANUFACTURER OF CIGARETTES
Readand Use The Mic ligan Daily Classifieds!

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