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March 27, 1956 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 27, 1955

IL
1

ommunist Party Secretary
'ired From Tiflis 'U'

Nuclear Energy Students
Visit 'U' Atom Projects

'

'V --

OSCOW MP-Tiflis University's
imunist party secretary has
a fired for failure to indoctri-
students with communism.
fficials and teachers at the uni-
ity are under criticism for fail-
to enforce "rules for socialist
r.
[arch Technic
o Go'On Sale
ie March issue of the Michigan
Linic goes on sale today.
Kuck Fine, '58, circulation man-
, advises students to buy their
es early, since the last two is-.
were sold out within the first
days of sale.
he current issue of America's
st engineering magazine feat-
such articles as "Industrial
s of Atomic Energy" by Hank
r, '59, "Pavement Testing at
.ow Run" by Paul Gogulski, '59,
"Welding Processes in the
omobile Industry," by Allan
pecial feature is "Tears and
rs and a Few Cheers," which
uaranteed to provoke a chuckle
wo from the readers.
lie Technic will be sold in the
ine Arch, West Engineering
ding and East Hall.
rticle editor Howard Urow, '58,
that the Staff is attempting
hake the Technic the country's
est selling engineering school

These fresh indications of wide-
spread disaffection among the
youth of Georgia, Joseph Stalin's
home republic, were disclosed in
Saturday's issue of the Tiflis news-
paper Dawn of The East, which
reached Moscow Monday.
It said the students have been
cutting classes wholesale for more
than a year, many have had to be
punished at the university or ar-
rested and some have been 'guilty
of hooliganism, the Soviet term
for antisocial activity.
Previously Dawn of The East
had told of Communist party
moves against the university ad-
ministrators and said the rector,
V. Kupradze, had been charged
with failure to maintain discipline.
On March 9 students at Tiflis
were given a half holiday during
which they paraded, carrying ban-
ners displaying portraits of Sta-
lin and Lenin, the founder of the
Communist soviet state.
Dawn of The East's editorial in-
dicated that, long before the cur-
rent Kremlin campaign to smash
the Stalin myth was publicized,
students and other persons in his
native Georgia already were show-
ing renewed signs of their intense
pride in their separate nationality.
This was apparently intensified
when the full-scale anti-Stalin
drive began, and burst forth in
various local disorders.
There were no indications here,
however, of any serious trouble.

By DIANE LABAKAS
A bright future is seen in the
field of nuclear science and en-
gineering by the 54 students who
visited the University's nuclear
projects this weekend.
The students were comprised of
scientists and engineers attending
the, Argonne National Laboratory
at Lemont, Illinois where they are
enrolled in a seven months un-
classified study in the science and
technology of nuclear energy ap-
plications.
Purpose of their eight-day tour
is to supplement their instruction
at Argonne. The school, which is
operated for the U.S. Atomic En-
ergy Commission by Argonne, is
part of President Eisenhower's At-
oms-for-Peace program.
"There is tremendous potential
for nuclear energy in the fields of
transportation, water resources,
electricity, and fuel," said visiting
student Matthew J. Letich of
American Bureau of Shipping.
Shipping Progress Cited
He pointed to the recent build-
ing of a homogeneous nuclear re-
actor by the Newport News Ship-
building and Dry Dock Co. as an
example of progress made in the
field of shipping.
"This reactor," declared Letich,
'is among five projects selected by
the AEC as part of its Five Year
Reactor Development Program for
Civilian Power Reactors.
He said nuclear energy has al-
ready proved effective in the run-
ning of submarines and saw great
potential for its use in commercial
shipping.
JamesK. Jensen, of John Deere
Waterloo Tractor Works, foresaw
future tractors being run by nuc-
lear energy.
"These tractors could cost al-

most double as much as the ones
presently used," he asserted. "The
materials used to build such an
engine are what is contributing to
cost, but the cost will come down
as scientists acquire more techno-
logical knowledge about the ma-
terials," he said.
Wide Aircraft Field
"Perhaps the widest area in
nuclear research is being conduct-
ed in the aircraft field," stated
Louis B. Wehle, Jr., of Grumman
Aircraft Engineering Corp.
He said projects being conductedI
by the University's Phoenix Proj-
ect and soon to be completed Ato-
mic Swimming Pool Nuclear Re-
actor are helping to accelerate the
growth of nuclear energy.
Wehle also praised atomic ener-
gy establishments at Oak Ridge,
Tennessee, Shippingport, Pennsyl-I
vania, and Detroit.
Cash, Snow Gone
At Same Time
Ann Arbor's snow removal funds
and the winter they had been al-
located for appeared to be near
the end today.
The city's 1955-g6 snow removal
budget totaled $58,000 of which
$42,000 was spent by the end of
February, according to Assistant
City Engineer Fred Mammel. The
remainder hadbeen expected to
last through March.
Severe storms such as last Fri-
day's seven inch snowfall may
easily have raised removal expenses
above the budgeted $58,000, Mam-
mel said, but the funds would be,
supplied by appropriations for gen-
eral maintenance work.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
USED CARS
1952 FORD, 37,000 miles, like new.
Phone NO 2-0738. )143N
1950 Ford Convertible. Good condition.
Reasonable. Cali NO 3-4129. Sun. 3-5,
Weekdays 4-6. Ask for Ivan. )142N
1952 PLYMOUTH 4 door sedan, heater,
seat covers, excellent condition. NO
2-9853 evenings only. )138N
OUR LOW
OVERHEAD
saves you money!
50 new and used cars to choose from.
Come out today to the BIG.NEW lot
at 3345 Washtenaw.
Fitzgerald
LINCOLN - MERCURY
Phone NO 3-4197
Open evenings till 8
1941 FORD Club coupe, good tires, no
rust, runs perfectly, $95.

BUSINESS SERVICES
Springtime
Is
Picture Time
Used Camera Clearance

ARGUS C3's-With
$34.95 to $39.95.

case and flash,

YOUNG DEMOCRATS PANEL DISCUSSION

"The Means of Securing Integration
in the South"
PROF. LESLIE - History Dept.
PROF. CUTLER - Psychology Dept.
BOB EVANS --NAACP
DAVE MARLIN - Law School
Women's League: Wednesday, 7:30, Rm. D, E
Also Club Elections

1952 CHEVROLET 2-door, grey,
clean and low mileage, $445.

real

KODAK PONY 135's - Complete
withcase and flash, $25.m
KODAK PONY 828-F 4.5 lens, 20.
SPARTUS-35 m m camera, $6.
KODAK 35--With coupled range-
finder and case, $25.
KODAK-8 m m movie cameras, $20.
REVERE 88-8 m m movie camera
with F 2.5 lens, $25.
REVERE TURRET-Magazine 8 m
m m movie camera, with F 1.9
lens, $89.50.
KODAK-Duoflex cameras, $9.
IKOFLEX-Automatic Reflex with
F 2.8 Zeiss Tessar lens, $69.50.
GRAFLEX 22-Latest model, like new
and with case, $67.
VOIGHTLANDER - Vessa 11 with
coupled rangefinder, F 3.5 Skopar
lens, $69.50.
AUTOMATIC ROLLEIFLEX - F 3.5
Xenar lens and full MX sync., like
new, with case, $155.
KODAK-Folding cameras, from $8.
Purchase from
Purchase
Camera Shop
1116 S. University Phone NO 8-6972
Have your camera checked
FREE
by our camera repairmen
DISCOUNTS
10 to 50%
On All
Cash and Carry Sales
EVERY DAY
VARSITY FLOWER
SHOP
1122 South University
Near Church St.

BOARDERS
BOARDER WANTED, call any evening,
NO 2-8312. )17S
HELP WANTED
MALE, general porter work. 8 to 12 hours
per week. $1.00 per hour. Call at 6:00
or after 10:00. NO 2-5614. )100H
SALES CORRESPONDENT-experienced
and efficient businesswoman desiring
permanent position dictating letters
to printing customers. Ability to use
dictaphone, knowledge of good cus-
tomer relations and sales letter writ-
ting techniques helpful.I
Edwards Brothers, Inc.
2500 S. State )99H
STUDENT ORGANIZATION is interest-
ed in finding a non-student woman
with business procedure to work aft-
ernoons from 3 to 5, and Sat. morn-
ings 9 to 12. Phone NO 2-5514 between
5 and 6 P.M. only. Ask for Fred Shel-
don. )98H
WANTED-Male to supervise children in
.after school hours. 25-35 years. Call
NO 5-5414 after 9:30 P.M. )97H
WANTED-Water front director for sum-
"Y" camp. Approved Red Cross in-
structor, Call Mrs. Gross, Y.W.C.A.,
NO 2-2581. ) 96H
COLLEGE MEN to work as group coun-
selors in 12 week summer eprogram at
Methodist Children's Village, Detroit.
Salary and maintainance. Previous ex-
perience preferred. Call Mr. De Muth,
KE 14060 between 9 and 5 P.M. week-
days. ) 95H
MATURE ENGINEER to do architectur-
al porcelain enamel layout, field work,
and handle office work. An excellent
opportunity to grow with a new in-
adustry. Salary commensurate with
ability. Phone 3-2407. )93H
WANTED--Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Excellent salary. Morning de-
livery, no collecting. Call NO 2-3241.
)84H
WANTED-Cab drivers. full or part timo.
Apply 113 S. Ashley. Ann A -bor Yellow
and Checker Cab Company. Phone
NO 8-9382. )70Bl
FOR SALE
GOLF CLUBS. 2 used sets - $35.00 each.
NO 3-4829. )163B

PERSONAL
INTELLIGENT, responsible young man
seeks employment as baby sitter, Ex-
perienced. Reasonable rates. Call Red
Phillips. 409 Allen Rumsey. NO 2-4401.
)128F
WE GIVE LOANS TOO-until your sub-
scription starts! Student Periodical,
NO 2-3061. )127F
FOR SALE - Telephone parts. Cheap.
Hurry. Phone NO 2-3119. )125F
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breasted tuxedos converted to
single-breasted, $18, or new silk shawl
collar, $25. Write to Michaels Tailor-
ing Co., 1425 Broadway, Detroit, Michi-
gan, for free details or phone
WOodward 3-5776. )118F
LOST AND FOUND
LOST--Sigma Alpha Mu pin. Contact R.
Arnove, 5 Wenley, W.Q. )154A
FOUND-Woman's watch on South U.
Phone NO 3-4145 F33. )152A
LOST - Man's gold LeCoultre watch
vicinity Couzens Hall. Reward. Phone
Jos. Haselby, NO 3-3393. )153A
LOST on either Hill, Packard or Main
Streets, yellow envelope containing
checks and cash for the Ann Arbor
Trust. Please return to 805 Oxford or
call Ken Hildebrand, NO 3-3474. Re-
ward. )1511*
SPORT GOODS
GOLF EQUIPMENT
Stop in and visit Michigan's best
equipped Pro-Shop. All-makes. Golf
clubs, bags, caddy carts, and ac-
cessories. Shag balls $2.00 per doz.
Open 12 noon to 8:30 P.M. Bob Ap-
plegate's Golf and Gift Mart. 200 N.
4th Ave. )188
TRANSPORTATION
LEAVING for Buffalo, New York, Friday.
Will take 3 passengers. Call NO 8.
9683. )46G
AVIS RENT-A-CAR OR TRUCK for
local or long distance use. Reason-
able daily, weekly, or hourly rates.
Nye MotoraSales, Inc., 210 W. Wash-
ington St. NO 3-4156. )155
RIDERS to Madison, Wisc. Leave Satur.
day A.M., March 31. NO 3-1511. Ext.
2651. Mr. Littig. )450
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

;.

t

4

..

College Roundup

NNNOW

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
BLAZEIRS
Sponsored by WAA
Oxford Grey, Navy, and White Flannel.
Also White Shetland Wool.
Skirts & Shorts Also Available
SALES OPEN TO PUBLIC
ORDERS TAKEN
March 27 .. . from 10 to 6
At Women's Swimming Pool

By TED FRIEDMAN
At Syracuse, the Men's Student
Government Senate defeated a
move to permit drinking on cam-
pus.
The student senators, in voting
down the plan, pointed out that
the traditions and principles of
the university prohibit the pos-
session and use of intoxicating
beverages.
In introducing the motion, stu-
dent senator Robert Smith noted
that surrounding colleges have no
such restrictions and that illegal
use of liquor is said to occur at
Syracuse in spite of its ban.
One student declared, "The uni-
versity seems to be inconsistant.
"Its principles prohibit certain
actions, while acts in violation of,
these policies seem to appear un-
der its nose."
However, members of the oppo-
sition admitted that the fact that
university officials may not neces-
sarily endorse the student senate's
approval of the motion did influ-
ence their vote in defeating the
motion.
* * *,
The Bethany College Messenger'
has published a series of functional
definitions which may find appeal
with modern schools of behavioral
sciences:
FRESHMAN: I don't know.
SOPHOMORE: I am not ,pre-
pared.
JUNIOR: I do not remember.
SENIOR: I don't believe I can
add anything to what has already
been said.
* * *
Unlike the Michigan student
who was recently hypnotized out
of over-eating, a Kansas State

i

College freshman reports a lack
of success.
A doctor hypnotized him at a
student assembly. The hynotist
told him he would be able to stop
smoking because cigarettes would
begin to taste like burnt rubber.
The freshman was then released
from the trance.
"I still have the habit," he re-
ports, but he says he can't stand
the burnt rubber flavor very
much."
Noted French
Editor, Author
To Talk Toda
The President, Gilbert Chinard,
of the Modern Language Associa-
tion of America, will speak at 4:15
today in the Rackham Amphithea-
ter.
Chinard, a noted French scholar,
will give his lecture, "L'Esprit du
dix-huitiene siecle," in French.
Chinard is the author or editor
of some 35 books in the fields of
French and comparative literature
and also a contributor of numer-
ous articles to learned journals. He
has done biographies of John Ad-
ams and Thomas Jefferson.
Now retired from Princeton,
Professor Chinard has had a
lengthy and distinguished career
in the United States. He also
taught for a number of years at
both the University of California
and Johns Hopkins University. He
has been a member of the Insti-
tute for Advanced Study at Prince-
ton and was a Guggenheim Fellow
in 1952.
All interested persons are in-
vited.
Present Musicale
Alpha chapter of Sigma Alpha
Iota, national professional music
sorority, will present its annual
American musicale at 8:30 p.m. to-
morrow, in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall.
The public is invited.
HAIR STYLING
for the matn who cares
by the nian who knows
hair sty es.

1953 WILLYS hardtop, 2-tone paint, ra-
dio, heater, overdrive, 20,000 miles,
white-walltires and like new, $745.
1950 PLYMOUTH Stationwagon, radio.
heater, in excellent condition, $445.
Jim White Chevrolet, Inc.
Ashley at Liberty, First at Washington
Phone NO 2-5000 or NO 3-6495
)130NI
BUSINESS SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING-Manuscripts,
law briefs, term papers, dissertations
etc. NO 2-5757. )38J
RICHARD MADDY - VIOLINMAKER.
Fine, old certified instruments and
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )31J1
SMITH'S FLOOR COVERINGS
205 N. Main 207 E. Washington
Headquarters in Ann Arbor for:-.
Armstrong linoleum and tile
NO 3-8321 NO 2-9418
Complete floor coverings shops
Mohawk and Bigelow carpets
Guaranteed installation or
"do-it-yourself."
)363

ARMY, NAVY
39c, shorts
Sam's store,

Today and
Wednesday

MEMMEEMMMM U

672-1 k g

'type oxfords-$6.88, sox
69c, military supplies.
122 E. Washington.
)123B

Dial
NO 2=3136

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH PRESENTS
Premiere Production
1955 HOPWOOD AWARD PLAY
"MY VERY. OWN"
Written and directed by Beverly Canning
Graduate Student '56
Wed., Thurs., March 28, 29-8:00 P.M.
STUDENTS 500 ALL SEATS RESERVED
$1.20 - 90c - 60c
Box Office Open 10 A.M. - 5 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

Why the Prime Minister
of Japan
reads The Reader's Digest

tI.

CLIFTON 'WEB GLOIA C
COLOR by DELUXE
C N E MASoPE

.#

i

-I

I

CLEAN
HOUSE
with
)YLE
VESDAY
of

"In this age of stresses, the work of The Reader's Digest, of
which I am an avid reader, is of great significance. The
Digest publishes the same articles simultaneously in all
parts of the civilized world, and, by so doing, it deepens
the mutual feelings of concern and good will among different
peoples. I earnestly wish for its further development in this
difficult world." Ichiro Hatoyama, Prime Minister of Japan
In April Reader's
{ Digest don't miss:
CONDENSATION FROM $3.50 BOOK: "DELIVER US
FROM EVIL." Fleeing the Reds, the Vietnamese
came: old women with collarbones shattered by
rifle butts, children with sticks driven into their
ears. Courageous exploits of a young Navy doc-
tor who won the love and admiration of people who
expected only death at the hands of an American.

A

I

GARG(
OUT WEDS

Ii WHAT ABOUT THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS? Hove the dis-
covery of these now-famous documents (fragments
of the earliest-known version of the Bible) throws
new light on the origins of Christianity.
AN EASTER SERMON. Here, in a condensation from
Peter Marshall's sermon "Because He Rose," is
Easter's stirring message of hope, as interpreted
t'by the beloved chaplain.s

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