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March 22, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-22

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THURSDAY, MARCH 2Z, 1956

l'.HE MICHIGAN .DAILY

PAGE'

THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1956 TilE MICliIGA~ flAil A
I

vhufai '/ 9...
WITH PHIL DOUGLIS
Daily Sports Editor
ROUND this time of year, sports editors go crazy.
The last big shout of the winter has faded into the distance .. .
and the opening whistle of the spring has not yet been blown. What
Shave we left? The answer is--nothing.
This week and next comprise what is commonly known as the
"dead period" in Michigan's sport calendar. It happens every spring.
The hockeymen have stashed away another national championship
ti'ophy ending the winter fiasco-and it's still too frigid in these
climes for those husky spring athletes to cavort outside.
What HappensĀ«...
'O WHAT HAPPENS? Inside Yost Field House the crack of bat
against ball resounds-fifty prospects shake the stiffness from
their joints-and genial Ray Fisher, smiles as a young sophomore
grooves a slick low-breaking curve. It happens every spring-but "it
still ain't baseball" for dirty black snow covers Michigan's diamond.
Around these ball players runs the unending stream of trackmen
. never going anyplace-just winding up where they started. Don
Canham's Big Ten Champions are still going at it-just as they did
last November. Only this time they await the crunch of the outdoor
cinders-still frozen too solid on historic Ferry Field to be of any use.
Over in the Intramural Building another Big Ten champion is
drilling-Bill Murphy's tennis team-but it is ball against wood-and
the confinement of a gym . . . because the myriad of Michigan's
courts is still heavy with slush-and the wind still blows frigid out
of the Northwest.
Over the hills and far away are Katzenmeyer's Kids-the golfers
-bAit the click of the mashie shot is missing from the fairway .. .
it's just too cold and sloppy. Yet the click can be heard somewhere
else-in the little known basement of the golf clubhouse-where
Schubeck, McMasters, MacMichael, Loeb and company dig into the
sawdust and blast shots off dirty cement walls . .. while Katzenmeyer
looks--smiles ... and waits.
* * * *
Still Too Early...
T'S STILL TOO EARLY. It's still March. But in a few weeks-
less than two to be exact-all of these athletes will find themselves
" locked in battle in the sunny Southland-and in the rolling hills of
the Carolinas. It will be the Dixie Classic . . . the Camp Lejune
track stadium . . . the classy courts at Vanderbilt. The champions
of the West-and "Champions of the West-To-Be" will obviously find
the competition a bit rough, for their opponents have been drilling
* . under sunny skies for weeks. Yet it will provide a crucial testing
ground-a 1ok-see at teams which could all rate as top contenders
for Big Ten titles.
It won't be too long before Ann Arbor will be back to normal as,
far as sports goes. The week after the populace returns from Spring
Recess-sport returns too-and the fascinating pageant of fast-break-
ing curve balls, overhead slams, long tee shots-and driving finishes
will swing underway . . . Our news columns will once more be full-
and sports editors will regain sanity once again.

Dons,

lowa

Favored

in

NCAA

Tilt

Set for Semifinals Tonight
In Cag Aetio at Evanto

Training Exhibition Game

CARL CAIN
... hope for Iowa

i

,V
N~vationals,
hawks Witt
By The Associated Press
BOSTON-The defending cham-
pion Syracuse Nationals defeated
Boston, 102-97, last night to win
their best-of-three quarter final
playoff series in the National Bas-
ketball Assn., two games to one.
Veteran Dolph Schayes, held to
a total of 33 points in the two
previous meetings; scored 27 last
night.
Syracuse, in its seventh straight
,play-off, opens the eastern semi-
finals at Philadelphia tomorrow.
S* * *
St. Louis 116, Minneapolis 115
MINNEAPOLIS - Bob Pettit
scored 41 points, but it took two
free throws by rookie Al Ferrari
with 54 seconds to play, last night,
to give the St. Louis Hawks a
116-115 victory over the Minneap-
olis Lakers in the deciding game in;
the western division semi-finals of,
the National Basketball Associa-
tion.

By ALAN EISENBERG
Associate Sports Editor
Special to The Daily
EVANSTON, Ill.-There seems
to be almost more interest among
the renowned basketball officials
who have gathered here in ex-
changing stories than in who is
going to win the NCAA hoop tour-
nament.
The reason? San Francisco is
regarded by just about everybody
as a "sure thing" to capture
its secondconsecutive collegiate
championship. The Dons, led by
the great Bill Russell, have run
their winning string to 53 games,
27 coming this season.
Sellout Crowd
A sellout crowd of more than
10,000' fans will settle in North-
western's McGaw Memorial Field
House for the action which begins
at 7:30 (CST) tonight.
In the first game Iowa's Big Ten
champions are favored to defeat
Temple, while San Francisco will
face underdog SMU in the feature
attraction.
These four teams are all that
are left of an original field of 25
which qualified for preliminary
competition. Since losing to Mich-
igan State early in January, the
Hawkeyes have scored 16 straight
triumphs for an overall record of
19-5.
Temple Defense-Minded
They will face a defense-minded
Temple squad which has captured
Chi Phi Wins
In Water Polo
Forfeits were the rule last night;
as only two of the six scheduled
social fraternity water polo tilts
were played.
In the first match Chi Phi edged"
out Lambda Chi Alpha in a tight
defensive game, 1-0. Larry Evans
scored the winners' only goal in
a sudden-death overtime period
after the regular game had ended
in a scoreless deadlock.
TKE Triumphs]

26 of 29 contests. Southern Meth-
odist, Southwestern Conference
champs, has posted a 25-2 record
while winning its last 20 games.
If things go according to form,
Iowa will meet, the Dons in the
finals tomorrow night. The Hawk-
eyes are given only an outside
chance of stopping the West Coast
entrants.
Up to Cain
Carl Cain, who has played bril-
liantly at times this season, will
have to come up with a sensational
performance if Iowa is to stop the
best collegiate basketball team in
the country.
'M'p
By CARL RISEMAN
"I want to jump 25 feet this
year."
Tom Hendricks, Michigan's star
broadjumper, believes he can do
it. He has been practicing very
hard this year, running wind
sprints and doing practice broad-
jumps for a couple of hours each
day.
A jump of 25' would be good
enough to take the event in the
Big Ten championships. Last year,
Hendricks finished a strong sec-
ond in the event, and has leaped
24C2".
Has Tied 'M' Record
Besides competing in the broad
jump, Hendricks also runs the 100-
yard dash and the low hurdles.
In the 65 yard low hurdles, Hend-
ricks has tied the varsity record of
:7.5 "about six times" and con-
cedes that it is an "extremely hard
record to break."
Brilliant in High School
He came to Michigan with a
reputation as a great track star.
He fashioned this brilliant career
at Northwestern High School in
Troit Ihi h nschnl com,eti-

TOM HENDRICKS
... sights set

By The Associated Press
The New York Yankees and
Brooklyn Dodgers, last year's
World Series rivals, highlighted
yesterday's spring training exhibi-
tion activity by whipping the
Kansas City A's and Detroit Tig-
ers, respectively.
Lefty Maury McDermott, ac-
quired by the Yanks from Wash-
ington in a winter deal, pitched
five innings of creditable ball to
help his mates gain a 9-5 win over
the Athletics.
Mantle Slugs Homer
Home runs' by Mickey Mantle,
Gil McDougald and Jerry Cole-
man paced New York's 13-hit at-
tack. Lou Kretlow took the loss.
A fine five-inning stint by Tiger
hurler Ned Garver was wasted as
the Dodgers pushed over a run in
the last of the tenth off Duke Maas
to defeat Detroit, 3-2. Randy
Jackson's single with the bases

loaded sent home the winning
run.
In other Grapefruit League ac-
tion, Larry Doby, a transplanted
Cleveland Indian, hit another
home run to lead the Chicago
White Sox to a 6-0 whitewashing
of Boston's Red Sox. Howie Pol-
let, attempting to make a come-
back, in the majors, pitched the
first three innings for Chicago.
Giants Edge Cubs
The Giants took a slugfest from
the Cubs, 11-10. Johnny Anton-
elli, though hit hard while on the
mound, gained the decision over
Warren Hacker. Each team hit
three home runs in the 26-hit bar-
rage.
Other games saw Cleveland wal-
lop Baltimore, 11-4, St. Louis top--
ple Milwaukee, 9-2, and Pittsburgh
defeat Washington, 6-3.

TOM HEN DRICKS
other Michigan track stars: Grant
Scruggs, John Moule, and Eeles
Landstrom.
Thehigh point of the trip, and
what was regarded by Hendricks
as the greatest thrill in his life,
came when the Michigan men
were invited to run in the Olym-
pic stadium at Helsinki, Finland.
Besides his track career, Hend-
ricks has become an experienced
sports broadcaster. He has his
own show, "The Sports Page"
which is broadcast over a local
radio station.
Pap's Golf Range
Open Saturday --
U.S. 23 off Packard Rd.

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I

LOOKING AHEAD:
Veteran Ice Defense To Returni in Fall

By BRUCE BENNETT
Michigan's WIHL and NCAA
kings, noted for their rugged brand
of defensive play this season, will
present a team cut out along these
same lines in the 1956-57 cam-
paign.
The Wolverines' rock-ribbed de-
fense unit of Captain Bob Pitts,
Bob Schiller, Bernie Hanna and
Neil Buchanan, plus the circuit's
stingiest goalie, Lorne Howes, will
all return to the fold next Nov-
ember.
Only Two Players Gone
In fact, the only losses from this
year's entire team will be Bill Mac-
Farland and Jay Goold, both for-
wards.
Bolstering this prize back-ice
contingent of veterans will be two
sophomores, touted highly by
Coach Vic Heyliger-Goalie Ross

Childs and defenseman Barrie
Hayton.
Childs, who hails from Owen
Sound, Ont., has shown steady im-
provement during practice sessions
and will relieve Howes of some of
the netminding burden.
Hayton, a product of Noranda,
Que., saw action against the De-
troit Red Wings and his presence
in the lineup could possibly re-
lease Buchanan for duty on one
of the forward lines.
'Second Line' Back
One of this year's attacking units
will return intact-the so-called
"second line" of Neil McDonald,
Dick Dunnigan and Ed Switzer, a
combination which Heyliger rates
as a big factor in the drive to the
national title.
Two sophomores will be in the
thick of the battle for a place on
the other two units-Don Gourley

i lu A. g1 pSAutJS
and John Hutton. Both play right Tau Kappa Epsilon was victori- tion, Hendricks ran the 100-yard
wing. ous over Tau Delta Phi in the sec- dash and competed in the broad
Veteran forwards returning are ond tilt, 2-0, as Bill Joss and Jerry jump, high jump and pole vault.
Tom Rendall, whose 21 goals this Estes scored for the victors. The crowning point of his fabu-
year topped the team in that de- Winners by fprfeit were Phi Sig- lous high school career came in his
partment - Don McIntosh and ma Delta, Kappa Sigma, Sigma senior year, when he personally ac-
Jerry Karpinka, along with two Phi Epsilon and Pi Lambda Phi counted for 21 points in the city
players who were injured most of over Theta Chi, Theta Delta Chi, championship.
the year-Baden Cosby anq Mor- Beta Theta Pi and Phi Kappa Sig- Last summer, the Maize and
ley Chin. ma respectively. Blue star toured Europe with three
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