100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 21, 1956 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21. 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNE~4DAV. MARflW ~1 1Q~ft

vc11 1 1l1 L Vil N1 li/JV

AMA ON UPSWING:

By TAMMY MORRISON
At the end of its second season,
inishing up this week-end, the
dramatic Arts - Center tan look
ack. on two years of progress.
In these two years, favorable
pinion of the DAC has grown,
nd attendance has grown with
. This season's "Hedda Gabler"
it an all-time high of more than
,000.
Joseph Gistirak, DAC's, director,
ays that students are partially
esponsible for the upswing, since
pproximately two-thirds of the
udiences are now students.
The main burden of actual pro-
uction still lies with the towns-
eople, however, although some
udents have been employed in
ilnor roles.
More Understanding
Gistirak feels that every one of
he plays selected for production
as something special to say about
fe. "Usually," he says, "they're
plea for the world, for more un-
erstanding among people. They're
Iso an affirmation and celebra-
on of the dignity and stature of
an."
Selection of the plays is usually
p to Gistirak. He picks them
om his own knowledge of theater
terature or from the suggestions
the audience or people inter-
ted in the DAC.
"My' choice is governed by vari-
les," he says. "I have to take
to consideration how well we can
o them, when and where they

Gistirak, the advantages and dis-
advantages to both arena and pros-
cenium arrangements balance each
other.
"With the arena stage," Gistirak
explains, "the audience identifies;
there is an immediacy of impact.
On the other hand, the proscen-
ium stage provides detachment
and perspective."
He feels that some plays adapt
well to either arrangement. He has
no special method of adapting his
plays to the arena stage, because
each scene has its particular de-
mands and problems. "I don't like
to work. consistently with either
one," he says. "Ideally, the per-
fect arrangement would be to
change off."
Switching
Gistirak thinks that switching
off between acting and directing
helps both one's acting and direct-
ing ability, but that it's not good
to do both at once.
He considers "Sleep" the best
play they've done this season. He
says of it, "It's a rary kind of
theater experience. It combines
the elements of theutheater most
often talked about - religious
vision, high level humor and free-
flowing dramatic structure. It's
a beautiful example of the way a
playwright adapts the drama to
the needs of a specific thesis."
Ann Arbor audiences are, in
general, more literate than the or-
dinary metropolitan ones, he
thinks. This enables the DAC to
produce a relatively higher caliber
play.
And as to the future of this
striving young theater group?
"Well," says the intent director,
"I hope that it will eventually take
its place in the tradition of the
Moscow Art Theatre or the Come-
die Francaise."

-Daily-Sam Ching

JOSEPH GISTIRAK
... a plea for the world"

have been performed before and,
whe.ther or not our production will
have anything to add to them."
Gistirak hopes to attempt Shake-
speare eventually. He feels that

same problems, on a smaller scale,
that a Shakespeare play would.
Special Technique
"There Is a special acting tech-
nique requiredto deliver verse with
passion and authority," he says.

the present production, "AE
of Prisoners," poses many of

Sleep

f the "The chief problem 4s the way in
which you transmit the author's
poetic feeling integrated with a
sustained dramatic impact. We're
not quite ready for that yet."
The DAC, following the trail left
by the old Arts Theatre, uses the
arena stage for economic reasons
f and because interested towns-
people preferred it. According to

Correspondent
Lauds Press
In Lecture
News coverage in this country
is now at the highest level that it
has ever been anywhere, accord-
ing to Paul A. Shinkman, Wash-
ington correspondent for the Cen-
tral Press Association, who spoke
yesterday at the University.
He spoke on "Washington News-
Mill" before a group of journalism
students.
Shinkman, a University gradu-
ate, listed the four main channels
of Washington news:
"1) Printed reports and mimeo-
graphed news releases put out by
some 800 government and non-
Government agencies;
"2) News conferences, such as
those at the White House, State
Department and embassies and le-
gations of foreign powers;
"3) Attendance at Congression-
al sessions, hearings and commit-
tee meetings; and in the missions
of foreign Powers on Embassy
Row."
He cited some figures pertaining
to last year's deluge of news from
the Capital. Included in this were
75 million pounds of printed Gov-
ernment reports; about 10,000
mimeographed news releases, in-
cluding 714 from the State De-
partment alone; and 315 pamph-
let prints of international treaties.
Organization
Notices
American Society of Civil Engineers:
North Central Conference details to be
discussed, tonight, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 3G,
Union.
Congregational and Disciples Guild:
Meditation-Study group, today, 5:10-
6:00 p.m., Guild House, 524 Thompson.
'* *
Gamma Delta: Lenten vesper Service,
tonight, 7:30 p.m., University Lutheran
Student Chapel, 1511 washtenaw.
* * *
Hille Foundation: Assembly meeting,
tonight, 7:00 p.m., Hillel.
Human Relations Film, "High wall,"
followed by a discussion, tonight, 8:00
p.m. Prof. Helen Peak will speak,
Hillel.
. . +
Il Circolo Italiano: Free coffee at
meeting, today, 3:15 p.m., Union Coffee
Shoppe.
Inter-Guild: Profgessor William Will-
cox, History Dept., will speak on "Chris-
tianity and Intellect-A Conadiction?"
today, 4:15 p.m., Angell Hall, Auditorium
A.
League House Judiciary Council will
not meet today.
* . .
Le Cercle Francais Prof. Spurlin will
show slides of France, tonight, 8:00 p.m.,
League.
+ .
Lutheran Student Association: Len-
ten Service followed by a review of the
Catechism, tonight, 7:15-8:00 p.m., Lu-
theran Student Chapel, Forest and Hill.
* * *
Michigan Union:- Try-outs, March 22,
7:15 p.m., Union.
* * *
Physics Club: Prof. D. A Glaser
will speak on "The Bubble Chamber,"
tonight, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 2038 Randall
Lab.
Sigma Alpha Eta: Initiation for new
key members, tonight, 7:30 p.m., League.

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
USED CARS

1952 CHEVROLET 2-door, grey,
clean and low mileage, $445.

1953 WILLYS hardtop, 2-tone paint, ra-
dio, heater, overdrive, 20,000 miles,
white-wal tires and like new, $745.
1950 PLYMOUTH Stationwagon, radio.
heater, in excellent condition, $445.
Jim White Chevrolet, Inc.
Ashley at Liberty, first at Washington

Phone NO 2-5000 or NO 3-6495

I

Phone NO 2-3261

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES

IIIE4'

505 E. Huron1

)130N
SPORT GOODS
GOLF BALLS
$4.85 dozen, reg. $9.00 value (repro-
cessed). Anything and everything for
the golferI Bob Applegate's Golf &
Gift Mart, 200 N. 4th Ave. NO 3-4829.
Open 10.A.M. to 8 P.M. )16S
FOR SALE
TRAILER - 1953 26 foot Whitley. Jack
Sunderman, Chelsea Trailer Court.
GR. 5-4121. )161B
MEN'S SCHWINN BICYCLE, good con-
dition. Reasonable. Phone NO 5-5349.
)160B
ARMY, NAVY type oxfords-$6.88, sox
39c, shorts 69c, military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
)123B
HELP WANTED
SALESLADI ES
Full or part time. Excellent salary plus
commissions. Apply in person only.
Mademoiselle Shop

USED CARS
TRANSPORTATION - $50, '47 Chevie
coupe, call NO 3-2090 after 6. ;128N
1941 FORD Club coupe, good tires, no
rust, runs perfectly, $95.

Open evenings until 9
)120N

LINES
2
3
4

1 DAY 3 DAYS
.66 1.47
.77 1.95
.99 2.46

6 DAYS
2.15
3.23
4.30

real

BUSINESS SERVICES
RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade.
)30J
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Automatic Rolleiflex F3.5 Xenar Lens
with MX Sync. Like-New. $155.
Complete Camera Repair Service
PURCHASE CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University Phone NO 8-6972
)408
SMITH'S FLOOR COVERINGS
205 N. Main 207 B. Washington
Headquarters in Ann Arbor fora
Armstrong inofeum and thie
NO 3-8321 NO 2-9418
Complete floor coverings shops
Mohawk and Bigelow carpets
Guaranteed installation or
"'do-t-yourself."
)36J
RICHARD MADDY -- VIOLINMAKER.
Fine, old certified instruments and
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )31J
WANTED TO BUY
'49 or '50 OLDS 88 convertible in good
condition, NO 5-5458, after six. )4K
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND-Clip board containing dissec-
tion guide, at Health Service. NO 3-
0521, Ext. 576. )147A
BOARDERS
BOARDER WANTED, call any evening,
NO 2-8312. )17S
PERSONAL
BRIDEY MURPHY--did you ever sub-
scribe to Time at student rate of $3
(6c a copy)? Student Periodical, NO 2-
061. )120F
NEED A RIDE into northwest side of
Detroit every Friday after 4 P.M. Call
Diane, NO 3-5032. )44G
TRANSPORTATION
AVIS Rent-A-Car or truck for local or
long distance use. Reasonable daily,
weekly, or hourly rates. Nye Motor
Sales, Inc., 210 W.'iWashington St.
NO 3-4156. )15

4

4

302 S. State

)94H

Films and Faculty-ledldkscussion 8:00 P.M.

Professor of Psychology

"High Wall"

6:45-8:45

"proves he is one of the most
versatile comedians alive!"

n,

L

By DICK HALLORAN
Dr. Naoe Naganuma, prominent
teacher of the, Japanese language
to foreign students, yesterday ad-
dressed University students'of Jap-
anese on present day trends in
that language.
Prof. Naganuma, the guest of
the Department of Oriental Lan-
guages and Literature, is on an
around-the-world trip to observe
how Japanese is taught in various
foreign countries. Besides the
United States, he will visit Cana-
da, several European countries, In-
dia, and Thailand before return-
ing to Japan.
The Japanese educator also ex-
pressed an interest in the teach-
ing of English as a foreign lan-
guage. Prof. Naganuma is direc-
tor of the Tokyo School of the
Japanese Language, largest lan-
guage school for foreigners in
Japan.
In his talk, Prof. Naganuma not-

ed that Japanese as an instrument
of Asian communication will con-
tinue to be important in the yearsj
to come. Due to Japan's leader-
ship i'n industrial development and
a cultural background similar in'
many respects to underdeveloped
nations in Asia, many students
from these countries are coming
to Japan to study in fields such as
agriculture.
Japan oftenmprovides these stu-
dents with more realistic ap-
proaches to their own problems
than do therUnited States and
other Western nations where
mechanization is at too advanced
a stage to be of use to them at
this time, Prof. Naganuma com-
mented. Command of the Japan-
ese language is necessary to carry
on this type of study.
Prof. Na g a n u m a described
changes in Japanese which oc-
curred after the war when use of
the traditional polite forms seemed
to lapse, particularly amongst the
younger generation. At the pres-!
ent time, however, there is a move-
ment back to the more honorific
terms, he said.

MATURE ENGINEER to do architectur-
al porcelain enamel layout, field work,
and handle office work. An excellent
opportunity to grow with a new in-
dustry. Salary commensurate with
ability. Phone 3-2407. )93H
PROFESSIONAL Girl Scout position
open for field director. Beginning May
1. Bachelor's degree, group and camp-
ing experience required. Month's va-
cation with pay, plus other benefits.
Call NO 3-1309, mornings. )90H
WANTED-Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Excellent salary. Morning de-
livery, no collecting. Call NO 2-3241.
)84H
WANTED-Cab drivers. full or part time.
Apply 113 S. Ashley. Ann A -bor Yellow
and Checker -Cab Company. Phone
NO 8-9382. )7013
CANOE TRIPS
Seek solituderand adventure in the
Quetico-Superior wilderness. Canoe,
complete camping equipment and
excellent food supplies only $5.50
per person per day. Grumman alu-
minum canoes. For colored booklet
and 'map, write to:
BILL ROM, Mgr., Canoe Country
Outfitters. Box 717C, Ely, Minnesota

WHY NOT enjoy Life? Especially at so
a copy-and that ain't no misprintl
Student Periodical, 2-361. )118p'
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breased tuxedos converted to
single-breasted, $18, or new sflk shawl
collar,. $25. Write to Michaels Tailor-
ing Co., 1425 Broadway, Detroit, Michi-
gan, for free details or Phone
WOodward 3-5776. )118F
IIJKI~bIU

4'

.X

n \
"RISING rHIGH"
A Musical Comedy
JUNIOR GIRLS' PLAY
Fri., Sat., March 23, 24 -8:00 P.M. - $1.00
Matinee Sat., March 24- 2:30 -75e
Tickets Available at the
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN BOX OFFICE
Wed., Thurs., and Fri. 1:00-5:00 P.M.

1952 PLYMOUTH 4 door sedan, heater,
seat covers, excellent condition. NO
2-9853 evenings only. )138N
1951 GREEN HILLMAN MINX 4-Door,
excellent condition, low mileage, $375.
Call NO 3-1933 -after 6 P.M. )137N

I

I

3
DAYS UNTIL
RED SOX
SLIDE

- -V.

I

OWN

11

p r e s e n t s

go

I

i

U U

k

I

I

V
S'HURRY! v
OnIyaFew
O Tickets
CLeft!
1956 MILITARY BALL
J U
Frid r ay 9-1 League Balroom l
featuring the music of
0o
DUKEL LINGiTON
and his Orchestra
V ~T/'1 !Af't IA nn '[+1Y121 - - Y TS'

date, if you'll order me a
Chuck Wagon Steak at
half a pound of
choice chopped sirloin,
secretly jprepared and
seasoned, bacon wrapped
and broiled.

and co-starring

A;

CINEMASCOPE
color ,y TECHNICOLOR

z

I

FINAL WEEK: Tonight
through Saturday 8:15 P.M.
Matinee Sunday 2:30 P.M.
Coffee Hour at 8 P.M.

DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
327 S. Fourth Ave. (Masonic Temple}
Box office open daily 10-5 Phone NO 2-5915 early for reservations
Admission $1.65 Students 99c

J46

I

1%

41

I

1

U

0
r

A

II

I

in
"THE ROSE TATTOO"

Preview at 9 P.M.
Regular Prices!

is a group of students and faculty members interested in the history and development of
the motion picture as a form of art. Its program for the remainder of the term is as
follows:

MOTION PICTURES
NATURAL COLOR"

I in addition to our
regular show...we're having an advance
preview of one of the most refreshing

March 26
April 23:
May 14:

THE CAT AND THE CANARY (U.S.-German, silent, 1927,
directed by Leni); BALLET MECANIQUE (silent, 1924, Fer-
nand Leger)
THE LAST LAUGH (German, silent, 1924, with Emil Jannings,
directed by F. Murnau); HAMLET (Danish, silent, 1919, with
Asta Nielsen)
THE RULES OF THE GAME (French, 1939, directed by Jean Re-
noir); NIGHT MAIL (English documentary, 1935, Grierson,

II

I

11

II

11

III

III

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan